Travel (General/Chat)

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  • Indonesian Cave Art Among Science's Top 10 Breakthroughs of 2014

    12/22/2014 4:35:01 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, December 18, 2014 | press release of the AAAS
    ...among the top 10 breakthroughs was the realization, made public in October, 2014, by scientists that cave paintings discovered in 7 cave sites in the Maros karsts on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia were actually between 35,000 and 40,000 years old. The breakthrough was significant in that it was the first time that prehistoric human cave painting art found in Indonesia, or East Asia, for that matter, was found to date during time periods usually associated with the "first cave painter" works long known to exist in Europe. In the potential landmark study, the researchers used uranium-series dating of...
  • Digging up the 'Spanish Vikings'

    12/22/2014 4:27:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Aberdeen News ^ | 18 December 2014 | Euan Wemyss
    Dr Garcia Losquino, who is from the region, was compelled to visit Galicia in Northern Spain unexpectedly when a number of Viking anchors were washed ashore in a storm in March 2014... "On the beach where the anchors were found there was a big mound which locals thought might have been a motte-and-bailey construction, which was used by the later Vikings in France. But with the help of a geographer using tomography we now think this was a longphort -- a Viking construction only found in Ireland during the early Viking age, and very similar to English Viking camps, where...
  • Keep the Pyramids, give us the Colosseum

    12/21/2014 7:38:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    'blog ^ | September 11, 2014 | Simcha Jacobovici
    The Egyptian archaeological community is in a tizzy. They are accusing foreign Egyptologists of being Israeli agents hell bent on altering their history. It seems Israel's ultimate goal is to reclaim the Pyramids. This charge was recently laid by Amir Gamal of the "Non-Stop Robberies" movement. It was published in Egypt's Elaph newspaper... Some of this is funny, and some of this is not. When I filmed archaeology in Egypt in 2004 for a documentary film on the biblical Exodus, the Egyptians were watching us like hawks. In Egypt, the bible is current history. Even though the Qur'an says that...
  • Truckers road rage waltz

    12/21/2014 10:48:47 AM PST · by Patriot777 · 12 replies
    Liveleak.com ^ | December 20, 2014 | unknown
    It was strangely majestic for a moment.
  • First auction of military Humvees to civilians lures bidders

    12/21/2014 3:44:36 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 9 replies
    upi.com ^ | Dec. 20, 2014 | Richard Tomkins
    The chance to own a U.S. military Humvee helped drive a record number of visitors and bidders to an online auction of Department of Defense equipment. GovPlanet, an online auction company contracted to sell U.S. military surplus, said more than 110,000 were attracted to its auction Wednesday of 25 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles and other equipment, such as cargo trucks and crawler tractors. The Humvees – in cargo and troop-carry configurations – were unarmored and the first surplus Humvees made available to the general public by the Department of Defense.
  • E-Z Pass helps states clock motorists’ speeds; accounts suspended for repeat offenders

    12/20/2014 9:43:53 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    Several states are using their agreement with E-Z Pass to monitor and punish speeders, adding to the increasing number of electronic speed-monitoring devices facing motorists.
  • Gone in a flash? The moment car explodes into pieces (truncated title)

    12/20/2014 2:00:14 PM PST · by SWAMPSNIPER · 13 replies
    MAILONLINE ^ | 11/20/2014 | SADIE WHITELOCKS
    A hair-raising video has emerged that a car full of masked robbers exploding moments after they raided a church in Russia - and witnesses insist they were hit by lightning. The dash cam footage uploaded by YouTube user World News TV, shows a vehicle speeding along with a police siren sounding in the background. All of a sudden the car bursts into flames and explodes, sending debris all over the road.
  • Former Egyptian antiquities minister faces questions over theft from pyramid

    12/20/2014 1:04:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday 12 November 2014 | Patrick Kingsley
    In April 2013, the three Germans -- two amateur archaeologists and a film-making accomplice -- crept inside the inner sanctum of the Great Pyramid at Giza, the last the seven wonders of the ancient world to remain relatively intact. The trio, conspiracy theorists Dominique Gorlitz, Stefan Erdmann and Peter Hoefer, wanted to show that the pyramid was not the final resting place of the pharaoh Khufu, as has long been accepted, but was in fact a relic of an even older empire. In an attempt to prove this, they scraped off part of the pyramid's cartouche -- the insignia that...
  • Stonehenge dig finds 6,000-year-old encampment

    12/20/2014 11:21:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC ^ | December19, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists working on a site near Stonehenge say they have found an untouched 6,000-year-old encampment which "could rewrite British history". David Jacques, from the University of Buckingham, made the discovery at Blick Mead in October, and said the carbon dating results had just been confirmed. But he also raised concerns about possible damage to the site over plans to build a road tunnel past Stonehenge. The Department of Transport said it would "consult before any building". The Blick Mead site is about 1.5 miles (2.4km) from Stonehenge and archaeologists said "scientifically tested charcoal" dug up from the site had "revealed...
  • Five Reasons To Visit Los Angeles In 2015

    12/20/2014 9:53:40 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 63 replies
    cbsla.com ^ | December 20, 2014 4:00 AM
    Los Angeles, in addition to being the movie capital of the world, is also listed as one of the must-see U.S. cities on many tourist lists. Famous for its celebrity sightings, red carpet events and Hollywood nightlife, LA is also filled with culture, historic locations, cutting-edge fashion and stunning scenery. Should you find yourself with some upcoming vacation time and you are trying to figure out where to go, here are five reasons to visit Los Angeles in 2015.
  • Polish family treasure an archaeological sensation in Sweden

    12/19/2014 11:36:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland ^ | May 12, 2014 | Daniel Zysk
    A small gold plate belonging to Polish family Sielscy from the Swedish Malmoe turned out to be an archaeological sensation. According to the researchers, it is probably a souvenir from the funeral of the Danish King Harald Bluetooth on the island of Wolin, dated to c. 986 AD. The discovery was made by 11 years old Maja Sielska, who diligently did her school homework about the Middle Ages. While looking through pictures of coins from this period in the textbook and on the Internet, the girl saw a plate with mysterious inscriptions similar to the one she had received from...
  • Unique 7th century silver bowl found in South Holland

    12/19/2014 11:29:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | July 2, 2014 | Source: Leiden University
    On an excavation site in Oegstgeest (South Holland), Leiden University archaeologists discovered a silver bowl dating to the first half of the seventh century. The bowl is decorated with gold-plated representations of animals and plants and inlaid with semi-precious stones. The discovery suggests the existence of an Oegstgeest elite with a wide international network. Researchers believe that the bowl, which is 21 centimetres wide and 11 centimetres high, was buried as part of a ritual sacrifice. Such gilded discoveries are extremely rare. This one is exceptional because such bowls were usually made of bronze and were not, as a rule,...
  • Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet

    12/19/2014 11:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Tuesday, 16 December 2014 | Ms Monica Tromp
    Known to its Polynesian inhabitants as Rapa Nui, Easter Island is thought to have been colonised around the 13th Century and is famed for its mysterious large stone statues or moai. Otago Anatomy PhD student Monica Tromp and Idaho State University’s Dr John Dudgeon have just published new research clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been a staple plant food for Rapa Nui’s population over several centuries. However, no other line of archaeological or ethnohistoric evidence supports palm having a dietary role on Easter Island; in fact evidence points to the palm becoming extinct soon...
  • Stone tools discovery prompts re-think of African theory

    12/19/2014 11:14:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | September 26, 2014 | unattributed
    The belief that a type of technology known as Levallois – where the flakes and blades of stones were used to make useful products such as hunting weapons was invented in Africa and then spread to other continents as the human population expanded can now be discounted say the researchers. At an archaeological site in Armenia called Nor Geghi 1, the researchers discovered that these types of tools already existed there between 325,000 and 335,000 years ago, suggesting that local populations developed them out of a more basic type of technology, known as biface, which was also found at the...
  • Back to future with Roman architectural concrete

    12/19/2014 2:10:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Lynn Yarris
    No visit to Rome is complete without a visit to the Pantheon, Trajan's Markets, the Colosseum, or the other spectacular examples of ancient Roman concrete monuments that have stood the test of time and the elements for nearly two thousand years... Working at ALS beamline 12.3.2, a superconducting bending magnet X-ray micro-diffraction beamline, the research team studied a reproduction of Roman volcanic ash-lime mortar that had been previously subjected to fracture testing experiments at Cornell University. In the concrete walls of Trajan's Markets, constructed around 110 CE, this mortar binds cobble-sized fragments of tuff and brick. Through observing the mineralogical...
  • Unique entry complex discovered at Herodian Hilltop Palace

    12/19/2014 2:03:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Hebrew University of Jerusalem ^ | December 18, 2014 | dovs
    Archaeologists from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute of Archaeology have discovered a monumental entryway to the Herodian Hilltop Palace at the Herodium National Park. The unique complex was uncovered during excavations by The Herodium Expedition in Memory of Ehud Netzer over the past year, as part of a project to develop the site for tourism. The main feature of the entryway is an impressive corridor with a complex system of arches spanning its width on three separate levels. These arches buttressed the corridor's massive side-walls, allowing the King and his entourage direct passage into the Palace Courtyard. Thanks to...
  • Remains of 8,000-year-old olive oil found in Lower Galilee

    12/19/2014 1:59:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | December 17, 2014 | Daniel K. Eisenbud
    The earliest evidence of the use of olive oil in the country, and possibly the entire Middle East, was unearthed at an excavation site in the Lower Galilee, the Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday. The discovery was made after Dr. Ianir Milevski and Nimrod Getzov directed an archeological salvage excavation at Ein Tzipori between 2011 and 2013. The excavation led to research that indicated that olive oil was already being used in the country 8,000 years ago, during the 6th millennium BCE... These tests revealed that the pottery, dating to the Early Chalcolithic period, contained olive oil, the researchers concluded... Of...
  • Massive 2,800-year-old farmhouse found in central Israel

    12/19/2014 1:52:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | December 15, 2014 | Lazar Berman
    Structure in modern Rosh Ha'ayin was used during Assyrian, Persian and Hellenistic periods. Israeli archaeologists uncovered an ancient farmhouse in the area of modern day Rosh Ha'ayin, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Monday. The structure is believed to be 2,800 years old, and consists of 23 rooms. "The farm, which is extraordinarily well-preserved, extends across an area of 30 meters by 40 meters and was built in the eighth century BCE, the time of the Assyrian conquest," IAA excavation director Amit Shadman said. "Farm houses during this period served as small settlements of sorts whose inhabitants participated in processing agricultural produce....
  • Travellers urged to explore Caribbean nation before it becomes 'Americanised'

    12/19/2014 9:31:52 AM PST · by C19fan · 19 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 19, 2014 | John Hutchinson
    Online searches for trips to Cuba are up a staggering 95 per cent following US President Barack Obama's plans to re-develop relations between the two countries. Tourists are being warned that if they want to see 'the real Cuba' they should book their trips now, before the Caribbean country becomes 'Americanised.' President Obama announced a 'new chapter' in US relations with Cuba, with plans announced by the White House include easing access for US citizens, lessening financial restrictions, and lifting the 54-year-old trade embargo.
  • Women arrested for 'using attractive girls to lure men into alleyways… where female bodybuilder

    12/19/2014 6:41:39 AM PST · by C19fan · 57 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 19, 2014 | Daniel Miller
    A ruthless Mexican girl gang is accused of using their prettiest member to lure men to secluded spots where a female body builder would put him in a headlock so the others could beat him up and rob him. Mexican police arrested the gang of six women who they suspect targeted dozens of men, many of whom were thought to have been too ashamed to report the matter to police. The gang, operating in the popular tourist city Cancun in the southeast Mexican state of Quintana Roo, used attractive Maria Sierra, 20, who targeted single men or at the most...
  • Man finds woman with ex-girlfriend's name to join him on free trip around the world

    12/17/2014 4:54:30 PM PST · by Gamecock · 37 replies
    ABC & Chicago ^ | December 17, 2014
    Remember Jordan Axani? He was the man left with an extra ticket for an around-the-world adventure when his girlfriend broke up with him. Undeterred from taking the trip, he set out to find another woman named Elizabeth Gallagher to use his ex's ticket. Fast forward a month...Axani has found his new Elizabeth Gallagher. After the story came out, 28-year-old Axani received thousands of emails, including 18 from women named Elizabeth Gallagher who held Canadian passports. Ultimately, Axani chose 23-year-old Elizabeth "Quinn" Gallagher, a student and former member of the Canadian Coast Guard. The two will meet in New York this...
  • Korean Air to be fined or given flight BAN over 'nut rage' tantrum

    12/17/2014 1:29:45 PM PST · by Gamecock · 12 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 16 December 2014 | Annabel Grossman
    Korean Air will be punished with a flight ban or fines after the daughter of its chief executive delayed a flight with a tantrum over being served macadamia nuts she had not asked for. Cho Hyun-Ah, a former senior executive with the carrier, forced the chief cabin crew member off a New York-Seoul flight after she took exception to the snack - and the fact it was served in a bag rather a bowl. The 'nut rage' incident caused a national uproar in South Korea - and triggered sales of macadamia nuts to soar.
  • ‘Poverty chic FTW': Lefty journo worried that US tourists will destroy Cuban paradise

    12/17/2014 9:35:28 AM PST · by C19fan · 21 replies
    Twitchy ^ | December 17, 2104 | Staff
    “Independent journalist” Jeremy Scahill is a blogger at The Intercept, which was co-founded by Glenn Greenwald. He is also a colossal moron: I'm very glad I was able to visit Cuba several times before US tourists try to turn it into Cancun
  • Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada

    12/17/2014 7:39:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | December 15, 2014 | Dawn Peters
    A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D. Researchers reporting in the journal Geoarchaeology discovered that the interior of the container, which was found at an archaeological site on southern Baffin Island, contains fragments of bronze as well as small spherules of glass that form when rock is heated to high temperatures. The object is a crucible for melting bronze, likely in order to cast it into small tools or ornaments. Indigenous peoples of northern...
  • Fiat’s Chrysler Group changes its name to FCA US

    12/16/2014 8:42:02 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 31 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Dec 16, 2014 10:59 AM EST
    Chrysler Group LLC has changed its name to FCA US LLC. The change will be largely unnoticed by consumers, affecting mostly corporate and financial communications. Chrysler-branded cars will continue to bear the Chrysler badge, as those branded Fiat will bear the Fiat badge. …
  • Fabiola Santiago: As tolls rise, Florida shorts Miami

    12/16/2014 7:44:24 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 2 replies
    Florida News ^ | December 14, 2014 | Fabiola Santiago
    While Miami-Dade residents were strike recently with new, rare fee hikes on vital east-west arteries, Gov. Rick Scott was rewarding his farming regressive supporters with $9 million to build and urge their toll-free roads. So while down south we compensate a way, a folks adult north who minister reduction to state revenues get a giveaway ride. Poor timing? Irony? A giggle to go with a slap to a pockets of Miami-Dade’s toll-payers? The governor’s proclamation from Tallahassee was all those things — and came by approach of press releases finished with difference of regard from a prolonged register of who’s...
  • France bans rideshare apps like Uber

    12/15/2014 5:14:50 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 23 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 15.12.2014 | Jasper Niels Zimmermann [nz/sb (AFP, dpa)]
    French taxi drivers have succeeded in persuading the French government to ban rideshare apps like Uber and Lyft. A harsh new law takes effect in January. The move is good for taxi drivers, but will cost consumers money. […] Pierre-Henry Brandet, a spokesperson for the French Ministry of the Interior […] said that as of January 1, the operators of mobile apps like UberPOP that connect non-professional drivers and riders would face punishment of up to two years in prison and a fine of €300,000 if convicted. Those provisions were specified under a new law that had been passed earlier...
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley
  • Quileute Tribe celebrates discovery of historic rock carving

    12/13/2014 6:51:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Seattle Times ^ | December 11, 2014 | Joseph O'Sullivan
    A fisherman stumbled upon a rock carving that appears to show a legendary battle in Quileute mythology... An old petroglyph found by a fisherman in the Calawah River was celebrated with a ceremony by a group of Quileute tribal members before it was moved to the tribal headquarters in La Push. State archaeologists authenticated the carving and think it may date to around or before the mid-1700s... The rock they stumbled upon appears to be a carving that depicts a legendary battle in Quileute mythology, according to tribal and state officials... The rock -- which could weigh up to 1,000...
  • Israel: 7,500-year-old lost Neolithic village discovered off coast of Haifa

    12/13/2014 6:43:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    IBTimes ^ | December 10, 2014 | Sanskrity Sinha
    A prehistoric water well hinting at the existence of a thriving Neolithic settlement has been excavated under water at Israel's East Mediterranean coast. The 7,500-year-old water well, currently under five metres of water, was submerged following prehistoric rise in sea level. Maritime archaeologist Ehud Galili of the Israel Antiquities Authority led the excavation at Kfar Samir site in collaboration with experts at Flinders University in South Australia and University of Haifa in Israel. Archaeologists said that the well which was a source of fresh water for the village dwellers was abandoned as the sea level rose. "Water wells are valuable...
  • Israeli cave offers clues about when humans mastered fire

    12/13/2014 6:40:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Science ^ | 12 December 2014 | Nala Rogers
    In layers older than roughly 350,000 years, almost none of the flints are burned. But in every layer after that, many flints show signs of exposure to fire: red or black coloration, cracking, and small round depressions where fragments known as pot lids flaked off from the stone. Wildfires are rare in caves, so the fires that burned the Tabun flints were probably controlled by ancestral humans, according to the authors. The scientists argue that the jump in the frequency of burnt flints represents the time when ancestral humans learned to control fire, either by kindling it or by keeping...
  • The Origin of the Number Zero

    12/13/2014 6:32:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | December 2014 | Amir Aczel
    Of all the numerals, "0" -- alone in green on the roulette wheel -- is most significant. Unique in representing absolute nothingness, its role as a placeholder gives our number system its power. It enables the numerals to cycle, acquiring different meanings in different locations (compare 3,000,000 and 30). With the exception of the Mayan system, whose zero glyph never left the Americas, ours is the only one known to have a numeral for zero. Babylonians had a mark for nothingness, say some accounts, but treated it primarily as punctuation. Romans and Egyptians had no such numeral either... Found on...
  • Water's role in the rise and fall of the Roman Empire

    12/13/2014 6:19:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 11, 2014 | European Geosciences Union
    Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows. But the stable food supply brought about by these measures promoted population growth and urbanisation, pushing the Empire closer to the limits of its food resources... Brian Dermody, an environmental scientist from Utrecht University, teamed up with hydrologists from the Netherlands and classicists at Stanford University in the US. The researchers wanted to know how the way Romans managed water for agriculture and traded crops contributed to the longevity of their civilisation. They were also curious...
  • Affluence Explains Rise of Moralizing Religions, Suggests Study

    The ascetic and moralizing movements that spawned the world's major religious traditions -- Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Christianity -- all arose around the same time in three different regions... The emergence of world religions, they say, was triggered by the rising standards of living in the great civilizations of Eurasia... It seems almost self-evident today that religion is on the side of spiritual and moral concerns, but that was not always so, Baumard explains. In hunter-gatherer societies and early chiefdoms, for instance, religious tradition focused on rituals, sacrificial offerings, and taboos designed to ward off misfortune and evil. That...
  • Scientists reveal parchment's hidden stories

    12/13/2014 5:59:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | Monday, December 8th, 2014 | Thomas Deane, Trinity College Dublin
    The new technique of analyzing DNA found in ancient parchments can shine a focused light on the development of agriculture across the centuries. Millions of documents stored in archives could provide scientists with the key to tracing agricultural development across the centuries... Amazingly, thanks to increasingly progressive genetic sequencing techniques, the all-important historical tales these documents tell are no longer confined to their texts; now, vital information also comes from the DNA of the parchment on which they are written. Researchers used these state-of-the-art scientific techniques to extract ancient DNA and protein from tiny samples of parchment from documents from...
  • Planned Arizona copper mine would put a hole in Apache archaeology

    12/13/2014 5:43:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Science ^ | 10 December 2014 | Zach Zorich
    A site on Apache Mountain, where Apache warriors plunged to their deaths to avoid the U.S. cavalry, may soon overlook a copper mine. Archaeologists and Native American tribes are protesting language in a Senate bill that would approve a controversial land exchange between the federal government and a copper mining company -- a swap that may put Native American archaeological sites at risk. The bill is needed to fund the U.S. military and is considered likely to pass the Senate as early as today. The company Resolution Copper Mining hopes to exploit rich copper deposits beneath 980 hectares of Arizona's...
  • South Dakota pulls driving campaign over innuendo

    12/12/2014 8:29:21 PM PST · by Slings and Arrows · 55 replies
    PIERRE, S.D. — South Dakota officials have canceled a public safety campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of jerking the steering wheel on icy roads, saying it's too risque. The Department of Public Safety has pulled the "Don't Jerk and Drive" ads, which played on the double-meaning of the word "jerk."
  • Does Mark Wahlberg want a 'white privilege' pardon?

    12/12/2014 2:33:25 PM PST · by Citizen Zed · 51 replies
    bbc opinion ^ | 12-11-2014
    According to court records, in 1988 a 16-year-old Mr Wahlberg brutally attacked a Vietnamese man named Thanh Lam with a stick while spewing racial epithets and knocking him unconscious. Seeing police, Mr Wahlberg fled and found Hoa Trinh, another Vietnamese man. He put his hand around Mr Trinh's shoulder and asked the man to help him hide. After the police cars had passed, Mr Wahlberg punched Mr Trinh in the eye, permanently blinding him. According to the police report, during his arrest the future actor used several anti-Asian slurs. He served 45 days of a three-month sentence, all while maintaining...
  • Like low gas prices? So does the station owner

    12/12/2014 2:26:30 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Dec 12, 2014 3:12 PM EST | Jonathan Fahey
    So you think you are finally getting one over on the gas stations as you pay well under $3 a gallon for the first time in four years? Guess again. Gas stations love low prices too—and not just because customers are nicer when they are paying less. “We’re in the same shoes as the consumer, the cost of fuel is less for us,” says Kevin Beyer, who owns Performance Fuels, a filling station and convenience store in Smithtown, NY. That means profits for Beyer and the nation’s 127,000 filling stations are rising. Before they sell gas to you, station owners...
  • New York Citi Bike program accused of shoddy maintenance and poor cleanliness

    12/12/2014 10:13:45 AM PST · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2014 | Sadie Whitelocks
    New York Citi Bike riders are at risk according to a new audit exposing spotty maintenance checks, poor cleanliness and defective docking stations. Comptroller Scott Stringer released his report Thursday looking at if New York City Bike Share, which manages the scheme, is in compliance with its Department of Transport contract. According to maintenance data, only 28per cent of the 6,000 two-wheelers in Manhattan and Brooklyn were inspected in November 2013, 34per cent in December 2013 and 38per cent in January 2014.
  • Forget Brooklyn! New York City borough of Queens named best place to visit in US in 2015

    12/12/2014 10:05:56 AM PST · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2014 | Simon Cable
    The New York borough of Queens has been given top spot in a list of the best places to visit in the US next year. The sprawling suburb, traditionally off the tourist map, has beaten a host of America's most famous destinations in an annual 'Best in the US' ranking compiled by Lonely Planet. The list praised Queens' microbreweries, beaches, global food offerings and ‘world-class’ art scene.
  • A world of trouble for SeaWorld

    12/12/2014 6:30:08 AM PST · by C19fan · 10 replies
    Washington Post ^ | December 12, 2014 | Terrence McCoy
    Under normal circumstances, an institution as big and famous as SeaWorld would be impervious to any number of public assaults on its standing. Like Wal-Mart or Comcast or Disneyland, one would assume it could bear any bad press and keep chugging. But after the release of the documentary “Blackfish” in the summer of 2013, it became clear to onlookers that these were not normal circumstances and not the usual bad press. That became dramatically clear Thursday, when the company’s CEO, Jim Atchison, resigned in a departure many link to the fallout.
  • Dominic di Natale, Fox News Reporter, dead at 43.

    12/11/2014 8:45:49 PM PST · by lee martell · 36 replies
    Dec. 11 2014 | lee martell
    There is very little information available right now, but Fox News reporter, Dominic was found dead in his apartment. The Coroner said his death was due to suicide. Police were alerted by a friend to check on Natale, due to his state of mind attributed most likely to an undisclosed health problem. Dominic, fluent in many languages, had worked at Fox since 2007.
  • ‘This is why we check our shoes’: The horrifying pictures of spiders in footwear.....

    12/11/2014 8:45:18 PM PST · by Morgana · 78 replies
    MAIL ONLINE ^ | 11 December 2014 | Heather Mcnab for Daily Mail Australia
    FULL TITLE: ‘This is why we check our shoes’: The horrifying pictures of spiders in footwear, children’s trampolines and car seats that are turning U.S. travellers off Australia Emerging from shoes, lying undetected in toilets, waiting patiently in cars and on walls, native wildlife has earned Australia the tag of a country brimming with deadly creatures. In many cases, this reputation is well-earned, with countless cases of bites, stings, and close encounters with the nation's creepiest of crawlies. Images of the poisonous and many-legged creatures have started to pack a frightful punch overseas, with many US citizens expressing their fear...
  • 'Star Wars' Theme Park Attractions to Be Based on New Films

    12/11/2014 7:52:10 AM PST · by C19fan · 4 replies
    Variety ^ | December 10, 2014 | Staff
    Two years after buying Lucasfilm for $4 billion, Disney is starting to reveal just how Star Wars will be integrated into the company’s theme parks. Main attractions will be based on new sequels and spinoffs — the first of which, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, bows next year — not the older films in George Lucas’ sci-fi franchise, according to Walt Disney Co. chief Bob Iger. “There will be a much larger Star Wars presence in our parks globally,” Iger said during a Q&A at Variety’s Dealmakers Breakfast on Wednesday, sponsored by Delta Air Lines and Bank of America. “But...
  • The Worst Caribbean Ports of Call for Cruises

    12/11/2014 7:47:47 AM PST · by C19fan · 65 replies
    Yahoo ^ | December 11, 2014 | Melinda Crow
    It’s dreary outside and you find yourself dreaming of an escape to the Caribbean. You long for turquoise water and sugar-sand beaches, with plenty of activities to take your mind off work. Cruises offer the perfect smorgasbord of beaches, shopping, scenery, and fun things that you can’t do at home, all served up with a fruity, umbrella-topped beverage. But not every port lives up to the image in your dreams. To help you choose your next cruise itinerary — or rather, figure out which places to avoid — Yahoo Travel did some digging around and found the Caribbean ports with...
  • How a Greenpeace stunt in Peru drives home the global climate divide

    12/11/2014 6:40:06 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 36 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 12-10-2014 | Nick Miroff
    When the stunt-planners at Greenpeace sent teams of activists to trespass this week at Peru's Nazca archeological site, they must have thought their bumper-sticker messaging would look good on a Facebook page next to the 2,000-year-old geodesic drawings. After all, the group is known for stringing banners from bridges and skyscrapers to draw attention to its environmental campaigns, and with U.N. climate talks taking place in Lima this week, the activists clearly wanted to make an impact. And so they have. The impact of their footprints on the fragile desert site, in fact, will last "hundreds or thousands of years,"...
  • British man becomes first person to visit all 201 countries... WITHOUT using a plane

    12/10/2014 5:25:35 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 12/10/2014 | Matt Blake
    Graham Hughes, 33, used buses, taxis, trains and his own two feet to travel 160,000 miles in exactly 1,426 days - all on a shoestring of just $100 a weekYesterday he trudged into Juba, the capital of South Sudan, to end the epic journey that began in his hometown of Liverpool on New Year's Day 2009Spent four days 'in a leaky boat' to reach Cape Verde, was jailed for a week in Congo, and was 'saved from Muslim fundamentalists by a Filipino ladyboy'His lowest point was when his sister, Nicole, died of cancer two years agoHe says: 'I think...
  • BBC theme park deal could bring Doctor Who and Top Gear rides to new £2billion Paramount attraction

    12/10/2014 8:28:47 AM PST · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 10, 2014 | Claire Carter
    Top Gear, In the Night Garden and Doctor Who could all feature in a new £2billion theme park alongside characters from Star Trek and Mission: Impossible. The BBC has signed a deal to allow some of its programmes to feature in the new multi-billion pound resort in Kent. Plans are still being drafted for how the theme park will work, but BBC shows and characters could feature in specific lands, games and rides at the London Paramount Entertainment Resort.
  • Danish Bronze Age glass beads traced to Egypt

    12/09/2014 5:22:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | December 8, 2014 | Jeanette Varberg, Flemming Kaul, Bernard Gratuze, tr by Michael de Laine
    ...The analyses revealed that the glass originate from the same glass workshops in Egypt that supplied the glass that the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun took with him to his grave in 1323 BC... Globalisation in the Bronze Age Twenty-three glass beads from Denmark were analysed using plasma-spectrometry. Without destroying the fragile beads, this technique makes it possible to compare the chemical composition of trace elements in the beads with reference material from Amarna in Egypt and Nippur in Mesopotamia, about 50 km south east of Baghdad in Iraq. The comparison showed that the chemical composition of the two sets of trace...