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Travel (General/Chat)

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  • Colorado Stoner Resort Plans Go Straight to Pot

    07/04/2015 2:11:15 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 26 replies
    THE AURORA SENTINEL ^ | July 3, 2015
    CannaCamp couldn't cultivate kush resort after national derision becomes a real downerA planned pot-friendly ranch resort in southwest Colorado has been snuffed before it opened. The 170-acre CannaCamp resort touted weed-friendly activities such as hiking and fishing. But a deal with the landowner fell through, and the marijuana-tourism company promoting CannaCamp announced Thursday that the resort won’t open after all. The MaryJane Group, which runs marijuana-friendly inns in Denver and Silverthorne, announced that it hopes to find a new home for CannaCamp by 2016. Guests who already booked stays starting at $395 per person per night are being offered stays...
  • Robber killed by former CNN journalist in attempted robbery reportedly identified

    07/03/2015 3:40:36 PM PDT · by rikkir · 27 replies
    Fox News ^ | 7/3/2015 | No author listed
    The man shot and killed by a former CNN journalist at an Albuquerque motel was reportedly identified by police Thursday night. Albuquerque Police Department spokesman Tanner Tixier said Tomorio Walton, 27, was involved in the shooting, the Albuquerque Journal reports. Walton was on parole in Memphis, Tennessee before fleeing police. Officials are unsure how long Walton was in the city for. Former CNN anchor Lynne Russell said her husband Chuck de Caro, and Walton exchanged gunfire after the man entered their room at a Motel 6 on Albuquerque’s western edge and demanded jewelry.
  • The Great Wall Of China Is Falling Apart. The Reason? Wind, Rain, And People Stealing Its Bricks!

    07/03/2015 12:01:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Indiatimes ^ | June 30, 2015 | AFP
    Construction first begun in the third century BC, but nearly 6,300 kilometres were built in the Ming Dynasty of 1368-1644, including the much-visited sectors north of the capital Beijing. Of that, 1,962 kilometres has withered away over the centuries, the Beijing Times reported. Some of the construction weathered away, while plants growing in the walls have accelerated the decay, said the report Sunday, citing a survey last year by the Great Wall of China Society. "Even though some of the walls are built of bricks and stones, they cannot withstand the perennial exposure to wind and rain," the paper quoted...
  • ISIS Destruction of Ancient Sites Hits Mostly Muslim Targets

    07/03/2015 6:04:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 02, 2015 | Kristin Romey
    ISIS has reportedly placed improvised explosive devices (IEDs) around the ancient ruins of Palmyra, in Syria, after recently capturing the adjacent city of Tadmore. The jihadi group has released images of the destruction of two shrines near the site... Michael Danti, co-director of the Syrian Heritage Initiative at the American Schools of Oriental Research, which is monitoring cultural damage in Syria and Iraq, reports that the pattern of IED placement appears to be optimized for "filmed destruction." Multiple independent sources confirmed to Danti that following the IED placement, ISIS members traveled around Tadmor using megaphones to announce their action to...
  • Free Checked Bags Come to an End on JetBlue

    07/03/2015 6:03:03 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 16 replies
    Airways News ^ | July 1, 2015 | Roberto Leiro
    No More Free Checked Bags on JetBlue. As of June 30, the airline introduced new fare options when booking tickets online, which include charges to checked bags, unless passengers pay for its premium fares. Passengers purchasing Blue fare—JetBlue’s base fare—will now be charged $20 for the first checked bag when purchased during web check-in or at a kiosk, or $25 at the check-in counter, and a $35 fee for a second checked bag.
  • Captain of TransAsia Flight 235 shut off working engine after other failed: Report

    07/02/2015 11:56:30 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    cnn ^ | 02:39 AM PHT Fri, July 3, 2015 | Tim Hume, CNN
    "Wow, pulled back the wrong side throttle." These are the words of the captain of TransAsia Airways Flight GE235, eight seconds before the plane clipped a bridge and plunged into a Taiwanese river mere minutes after takeoff, killing 43 people on board. The latest report by Taiwan's Aviation Safety Council into the February crash confirms that the captain of the ATR 72-600 turboprop aircraft mistakenly switched off the plane's working engine after the other lost power. The plane is designed to be able to be flown on one engine. The report also showed that the captain had failed simulator training...
  • Roman Villa Reopens on Wild Tuscan Island

    07/02/2015 11:34:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, July 2, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The remains of one of the most prestigious maritime villas from Roman times are set to reopen July 2 in a small, almost uninhabited island off the Tuscan coast after been locked for 15 years. Commonly known as "Villa Domitia," the imperial complex stood magnificently 2,000 years ago on the island of Giannutri, a rocky crescent about 3 miles long with thick areas of Mediterranean vegetation... The majestic complex marks Giannutri's most glorious time. Today the southernmost island of the Tuscan archipelago is almost empty -- populated by a huge colony of seagulls and, in summer, by a group of...
  • Gold coin may be key to solve Sweden's 'Pompeii'

    07/02/2015 9:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The Local ^ | August 18, 2014 | Solveig Rundquist/Oliver Gee
    A small team of archaeologists at Kalmar County museum, in collaboration with Lund University, has been digging at the site for the past three years. The team is studying the Migration Period in Scandinavian history, from about 400 to 550 AD... While the team has found several hundred of the coin already, Monday's discovery was a big one, said archaeologist and project manager Helena Victor. "This is the first one found in an archaeological context," she told The Local. "Normally we find them while we're plowing the field. But we found this one inside a house where we found people...
  • What GOD created for us!

    07/02/2015 7:07:27 AM PDT · by Cats Pajamas · 5 replies
    Epoch Times ^ | May 30, 2015 | Jonathan Zhou
    But for our hypothetical hermit, there is no escape: a Swedish man recently sailed across Antarctica, capturing his 16-day odyssey in hours of HD drone footage so viscerally stunning, you can expect copycats to continuously make similar treks to the swathes of ice caps down under for the next century.
  • The Fall and Rise and Fall of Pompeii

    07/01/2015 5:37:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | July 2015 | Joshua Hammer
    ...The two towns remained largely undisturbed, lost to history, through the rise of Byzantium, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In 1738, Maria Amalia Christine, a nobleman's daughter from Saxony, wed Charles of Bourbon, the King of Naples, and became entranced by classical sculptures displayed in the garden of the royal palace in Naples. A French prince digging in the vicinity of his villa on Mount Vesuvius had discovered the antiquities nearly 30 years earlier, but had never conducted a systematic excavation. So Charles dispatched teams of laborers and engineers equipped with tools and blasting powder to the site of...
  • Bulgarian Archaeologist Discovers Previously Unknown Ancient Thracian Fortress...[on] Ropotamo River

    07/01/2015 4:58:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | June 30, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    An ancient fortress unknown to Bulgarian and international archaeology has been discovered in the thick and almost subtropical forests along the Ropotamo River in Southeast Bulgaria, the National Museum of History in Sofia has announced. The discovery has been made by Dr. Ivan Hristov, Deputy Director of the National Museum of History, who has also been excavating several other archaeological sites along Bulgaria's Southern Black Sea coast, including the Talaskara Fortress on Cape Chervenka (Chrisosotira). The previously unknown fortress, which appears to have been inhabited by Ancient Thracians, has been found in "the jungle of the Ropotamo" River, in the...
  • New study shows South Africans using milk-based paint 49,000 years ago

    07/01/2015 4:51:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 30, 2015 | Jim Scott, University of Colorado at Boulder
    While the use of ochre by early humans dates to at least 250,000 years ago in Europe and Africa, this is the first time a paint containing ochre and milk has ever been found in association with early humans in South Africa, said Paola Villa, a curator at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History and lead study author. The milk likely was obtained by killing lactating members of the bovid family such as buffalo, eland, kudu and impala, she said... The powdered paint mixture was found on the edge of a small stone flake in a layer of...
  • Ancient footprint discovery leaves lasting impression at Vindolanda

    07/01/2015 4:25:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Vindolanda Trust ^ | Tuesday, June 30, 2015 | Sonya Galloway
    Nowhere gets you closer to the Romans on Hadrian's Wall than the fort and settlement of Vindolanda, the extraordinary hoard of personal artefacts gives you a unique insight into the lives of people living here 2000 years ago. The latest addition to the collection of artefacts from the current excavation has certainly made an impression on everyone. Someone 2000 years ago quite literally put their foot in it and as a result a volunteer digging at the site has unearthed a tile with a clear imprint of a human foot that accidentally, or perhaps mischievously stood on the freshly made...
  • 5,500-Year-Old Fingerprint Found on Ceramic Vessel

    07/01/2015 4:17:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Discovery News ^ | June 26, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Danish archaeologists doing a survey ahead of the construction of the Femern Belt link scheme, an immersed tunnel that will connect the German island of Fehmarn with the Danish island of Lolland, have found a 5,500-year old-ceramic vessel bearing the fingerprint of the artisan who made it. The vessel is known with the name "funnel beaker," a kind of ceramics which features a flat bottom with a funnel shaped neck. Such earthenware is characteristic of the Funnel Beaker Culture (4000 – 2800 B.C.), which represents the first farmers in Scandinavia and the north European plain. It was found in pieces...
  • Jerusalem family finds 2,000-year old mikveh underneath living room

    07/01/2015 4:11:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | Tammuz 14, 5775 (July 1, 2015) | Nir Hasson
    A Jerusalem family ripping up its living room floor found a staircase lost for 2,000 years, leading to a large ritual bath carved out of bedrock. It took the family some years to call in the authorities and show them the discovery beneath their house, in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ein Kerem. Throughout the interim, the family blocked off the entrance to the mikveh with wooden doors, and simply continued to live over it. When they did call in the Israel Antiquities Authority, beneath the doors, the archaeologists found the carved stone staircase leaving to a big mikveh, 3.5 meters...
  • Aston Martin reveals $2.3m hi-tech 'Vulcan' hypercar

    07/01/2015 3:37:57 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 41 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 30th June 2015 | Mark Prigg
    'It is one of the most hi-tech cars ever created - and you'll need to go on a course to learn how to drive it, even if you can afford the $2.3m pricetag. Aston Martin Vulcan showed off its track only 'hypercar' at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. It features a hi-tech dashboard and smart steering wheel from which almost everything can be controlled.'
  • Fallen Egypt archaeologist wants international Grand Museum [ Zahi Hawass is back! ]

    06/30/2015 12:24:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-30-2015 | By Brian Rohan
    In this June 18, 2015 photo, Zahi Hawass, Egypt's former head of antiquities, stands next to his new book, "The legend of Tutankhamun," as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office in Cairo. For more than a decade, he was the self-styled Indiana Jones of Egypt, presiding over its antiquities and striding through temples and tombs as the star of TV documentaries that made him an international celebrity. But four years after the 2011 uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak and nearly ended his own career, Hawass can be found in a cramped office, lamenting...
  • Many Options, No Single Solution to Nation's Traffic Snarls

    06/30/2015 10:47:03 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 38 replies
    ABC News ^ | June 27, 2015 | Joan Lowy
    The problem is clear: Traffic congestion will become significantly worse and more widespread without big changes in how people and products get around. Build more roads. Build more public transit. Rely on new technology. The possible solutions are many, but none is easy or cheap. A few ways to ease the nation's gridlock: ——— PUBLIC TRANSIT RENAISSANCE Ridership on public buses, trains and subways has reached its highest level nationally since the 1950s, and transit boosters cite this as evidence that expanded service and routes is a good investment. The nation's driving capital, Los Angeles, is making a multibillion-dollar investment...
  • United Airlines Flight Forced To Turn Around After Passenger Refuses To Stop Smoking

    06/29/2015 5:47:03 PM PDT · by SMGFan · 53 replies
    Consumerist ^ | June 29, 2015
    Though it might seem like “no smoking” signs on airplanes aren’t even needed anymore — who could possibly think lighting up a cigarette in an enclosed cabin filled with other people is okay? — there are apparently those out there who still need reminding that smoking isn’t allowed. To wit: a United Airlines flight headed to Boston from Denver was forced to turn around after a passenger reportedly lit up and refused to stop smoking. Officials said the flight returned to Denver International Airport around midnight on Friday due to a disturbance on board, an airport spokesperson told Channel 2...
  • Did Kim Jong-un have the architect behind North Korea's new airport executed because he did not [tr]

    06/29/2015 12:25:03 PM PDT · by C19fan · 13 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 29, 2015 | Staff
    It has been claimed the chief architect of Pyongyang Airport was executed by North Korea's totalitarian leader Kim Jong-un because he disliked his designs. Ma Won-chun, who was North Korea's director of the Designing Department of the National Defence Commission, vanished last year and was allegedly executed in November. This coincided with a report the same month explaining how the fearsome ruler was dissatisfied with the construction of Terminal 2 at the country's capital city.
  • Hill fort said to be where King Arthur's Guinevere was born has lasted 3,000 years... under siege

    06/29/2015 7:09:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Saturday, June 27, 2015 | Robin Stummer
    A powerful group of senior archaeologists are sharpening their trowels to fight "ethically unacceptable" plans they say will destroy one of the nation's greatest Iron Age treasures. Old Oswestry Hill Fort, an imposing ancient feature that dominates the skyline on the fringe of the Shropshire market town, is on the frontline of an increasingly bitter struggle pitting historians and residents against the local authority and central government. At stake is the ancient rural surroundings of the hill fort, an elaborate, 3,000-year-old earthwork dubbed "the Stonehenge of the Iron Age". It is said to have been the birthplace of Queen Ganhumara...
  • RSS gives defunct ASI wing a job: Search for Dwarka, Rama Setu

    06/28/2015 3:09:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    DNA India ^ | Sunday, June 28, 2015 | Rohinee Singh
    The defunct underwater wing of the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) is set for a revival with the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and the government keen to establish the scientific veracity of Dwarka, the mythological submerged capital of Lord Krishna's kingdom, and the Rama Setu, a set of limestone shoals believed to date back to the Ramayana... "The National Institute of Oceanography has the expertise. They will be training our fleet of young divers," said Dr RS Fonia, ASI joint director general. The ministry of culture, the nodal ministry for ASI, is also looking at options to bring on board...
  • Archaeologists find Bronze Age food at prehistoric settlement "comparable to the Mary Rose"

    06/28/2015 11:17:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Culture24 ^ | June 25, 2015 | Ben Miller
    An "extraordinary testimony" to the lives of prosperous people in Bronze Age Britain could lie under the soil of a 1,100-square metre site destroyed in a fire 3,000 years ago, say archaeologists who are about to start digging within a brick pit near Peterborough. Must Farm -- part of the Flag Fen Basin, and the site where nine pristine log boats were famously unearthed in 2011 -- was protected by a ring of wooden posts before a dramatic fire at the end of the Bronze Age caused the dwelling to collapse into the river. Its submergence preserved its contents, creating...
  • Mysterious 2,000-year-old marble dolphin surfaces near Gaza

    06/28/2015 11:11:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | June 25, 2015 | Ilan Ben Zion
    You would think that 12 miles inland from the Mediterranean Sea is the last place to find a dolphin clutching a fish between its jaws. Hewn from marble, the 2,000-or-so-year-old statuette surfaced during archaeological excavations near Kibbutz Magen, bordering the Gaza Strip, in March of this year. The discovery of the dolphin statue amid the ruins of a late Byzantine and early Islamic site in the northern Negev was only announced this week by Israel's Antiquities Authority. Alexander Fraiberg, head archaeologist with the IAA team, said he believes the sculpture dates to the Roman era, but was incorporated into a...
  • Dundee experts recreate face of Saxon man at Lincoln Castle

    06/28/2015 11:04:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    University of Dundee ^ | Wednesday, June 3, 2015 | Roddy Isles
    The work has been carried out by specialists in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) at the University of Dundee, one of the world's leading centres for facial reconstruction. Caroline Erolin, Lecturer in Forensic and Medical Art at CAHID, said, "His grave lay slightly under an important sarcophagus burial, which had resulted in excellent preservation of his skull making it the best candidate among the skeletons for facial reconstruction." ... "The burial of this man was one of eight burials which were interred inside a small stone church or chapel which predates Lincoln Castle and was previously unknown,"...
  • Disney World bans selfie stick

    06/26/2015 12:02:38 PM PDT · by C19fan · 21 replies
    AP ^ | June 26, 2015 | Staff
    Don't bring your selfie stick to Disney World. Officials announced Friday that a ban takes effect Tuesday at all four Disney theme parks in Orlando as well as at Disney's water parks and Disney Quest, a gaming attraction at Downtown Disney.
  • What, Nobody Wants To Sit Next To This Unattended Bag Of Snakes On The F Train?

    06/26/2015 11:13:40 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Gothamist ^ | 6/26 | John Del Signore
    We hear no end of complaining about how overcrowded the subways are and how hard it is to find a seat, and yet here we have enough room on the F train for at least five people (maybe even six) and nobody wants to sit down? So there's a bag with a big fat snake or two sitting there, big deal. We've sat next to worse. This photo and video (below) were sent to us by commuter Hiram Becker, who remarks, "I was riding the F train on Sunday afternoon from the 7th and 9th street stop in Park Slope...
  • Seattle man's speed trap warning sign lands him $138 ticket

    06/26/2015 5:23:23 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 48 replies
    komonews ^ | Jun 22, 2015 | Lindsay Cohen
    SEATTLE -- Panhandlers carry them. Protestors call them essential. But one Seattle man's sign -- warning of a speed trap -- has been dubbed illegal and could end up costing him $138. "I thought it was nonsense," said Daniel Gehlke, who made the handwritten sign "Cops Ahead! Stop at sign and light!" with a marker and a Rubbermaid top. "I am a believer that the Constitution, the Bill of Rights are there specifically so they can't be modified or restricted. This clearly is not a stop sign." Gehlke was holding the sign near 14th Avenue S. and S. Washington Street...
  • CDF Reportedly Judges Medjugorje Apparitions False, but Permits Pilgrimage

    06/26/2015 12:05:47 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 2 replies
    According to Italian media reports, the Vatican congregation concluded June 24 that the alleged Marian apparitions are inauthentic, but recognized the site as a place of prayer.If reports in Italian media outlets are to be believed, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith met June 24 to discuss the alleged Marian apparitions in Medjugorje, reaching the conclusion that they are inauthentic, but recognizing the site as a place of prayer. On Thursday, Vatican watcher Gianluca Barile wrote that, “for the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, in fact, the ‘apparitions’ do not have any supernatural character; therefore,...
  • Public Belt Railroad derailment caused by switch

    06/25/2015 1:55:54 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 2 replies
    An improperly secured switch was to blame for the derailment in New Orleans East last month of two railroad cars carrying some 60,000 gallons of crude oil, according to the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad. ... An investigation found the switch handle at Jourdan Road had been “out of the foot latch and in neutral position,” Beck said. “The cause of the derailment was that the switch was not secured properly,” she said, “although it cannot be definitively determined what caused the switch to not be secured properly.” The switch was found to be in proper working order with no...
  • GOP measure would permit longer tandem trucks

    06/25/2015 1:27:53 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 25, 2015 3:34 PM EDT | Andrew Taylor
    Over the objections of safety advocates, the Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday approved a trucking industry bid to allow longer tandem trucks on the nation’s highways. The change, sought by the American Trucking Associations and large haulers such as FedEx Corp., would increase the permitted length of trailers hauled in tandem from 28 feet to 33 feet. […] Pushing the measure were large trucking operations that stand to profit from lower costs. In opposition were unions such as the Teamsters, many states and local governments, and safety advocates. Many smaller trucking companies were against it as well. …
  • Discovery of metal vessels "will change the story about Chachapoyas"

    06/24/2015 8:52:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Peru This Week ^ | June 23, 2015 | Hillary Ojeda
    Metals had never been found in Chachapoyas before the finding of these two vessels. They might not be as sacred as the Holy Grail, but two metal vessels recently discovered in Chachapoyas are turning heads in regards to understanding the region’s ancient history. “The Finding of these vessels will change the story about Chachapoyas” the Decentralized Department of Culture of the Amazonas head, Jose Santos Trauco Ramos, told El Comercio. The discovery of two silver vessels in the Soloco Purunllacta in Chachapoyas of the Amazonas department are unlike anything the archaeological team has found in its history. Investigations until this...
  • Well-preserved ancient Roman ship found in waters off Sardinia coast

    06/24/2015 8:48:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | June 23, 2015 | Nick Squires
    A remarkably well-preserved ancient Roman ship has been discovered on the seabed off the coast of Sardinia. The 2,000-year-old wreck was found at a depth of 150ft by a specialised diving unit of the Italian police, working in collaboration with archaeologists, in the strait that separates Sardinia from Corsica. The ship was carrying a load of terracotta tiles, which are also in a good state of preservation. The roof tiles, believed to have been produced in or around Rome, were packed into the hold of the vessel, which is 60ft long and 23ft wide. They were probably going to be...
  • I Love South Carolina (Ben Stein)

    06/24/2015 2:05:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    American Prowler ^ | 6.24.15 | Ben Stein
    A brilliant example of what America can be.A ffew humble thoughts on race, violence, and South Carolina. The crimes of Dylann Roof were spectacularly horrible. To murder in cold blood nine men and women who were praising the Lord is unfathomably evil. There is simply no excuse for it. The moral power and restraint of the Charleston black community is historically magnificent. Nothing less than that. The love and forgiveness of the victims’ families is breathtaking, one of the great moments in human history. And while I don’t think that the rebel battle flag flying over the statehouse in Columbia...
  • Samsung Safety Truck

    06/24/2015 1:08:27 PM PDT · by Pelham · 2 replies
    Youtube ^ | 6/17/2015 | Samsung
    video
  • 'Safety Truck' features rear screens with view from the front

    06/24/2015 7:17:21 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 13 replies
    upi ^ | June 23, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    BUENOS AIRES, - Electronics firm Samsung is aiming to reduce road fatalities with a "clear" truck featuring a rear-mounted screen to show cars the hazards in front of the semi. Samsung Argentina shared a video on YouTube showing the Safety Truck in action on the country's notoriously hazardous roads with only one lane of traffic going each way. "In Argentina almost one person dies in a traffic accident every hour," the text in the video reads, "80 percent happen on roads, mainly from people attempting to overtake." The Safety Truck attempts to head off such a situation by allowing motorists...
  • Request for Freeper Help - Major GPS Screw-up

    06/23/2015 9:46:40 PM PDT · by goodn'mad · 33 replies
    Vanity ^ | June 24, 2015 | goodn'mad
    Requesting help from Fellow Freepers. Major screw-up. Flew in from S. Korea and tried to update my TOMTOM GPS in order to help me find my way around the Sumter, SC area. To make a long story short....I think I corrupted and/or deleted files actually embedded on the GPS. Now can't get it to do anything. Does anyone have a link to software that can restore the GPS to factory settings? I'd be happy with that. Or, maybe a POC of someone who specializes in restoring GPS devices? Thought they would be plentiful but I guess not. The GPS is...
  • San Diego Zoo's 150-Year-Old Galapagos Tortoise Dies

    06/23/2015 10:55:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 43 replies
    NBC San Diego ^ | 6/22 | Samantha Tatro
    The San Diego Zoo's Galapagos tortoise Speed, estimated to be more than 150 years old, has died. Speed had been under veterinary care for geriatric conditions including arthritis and was euthanized by zoo staff on Friday. Veterinarians had worked to treat Speed with medications, hydrotherapy, acupuncture and physical therapy treatments during his later years. The tortoise came to the zoo in the 1930s as a part of an effort to help preserve tortoise species from the Volcan Cerro Azul Island of the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. Speed was known in his younger years as an alpha male who would butt...
  • Like being there: Walking through an ancient Roman town

    06/23/2015 12:17:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, June 21, 2015 | editors
    ...for the archaeologist of 20 years ago, might have been the stuff of science fiction. Who would have known then that scientists would resurrect in startling detail an entire ancient Roman town after only fractional excavation? And who would have known that thousands of people from nearly every corner of the world would be able to 'walk' through that town without ever physically setting foot within?  This, however, is exactly what has happened for an obscure archaeological site located in Portugal -- a relatively small ancient Roman town whose few visible remains have attracted comparatively few visitors -- at least...
  • Jellyfish-lamb Hybrid Ends Up as Meat at French Slaughterhouse

    06/23/2015 12:10:50 PM PDT · by palmer · 13 replies
    laboratoryequipment.com ^ | Tue, 06/23/2015 - 12:29pm | Seth Augenstein, Digital Reporter
    A lamb that was genetically modified with jellyfish genes for advanced research was sold to a slaughterhouse for meat in France, according to European news accounts. An investigation to find out how the genetically-altered animal ended up as meat is underway, according to Le Parisien, the French newspaper that broke the story. "Rubis, the lamb, was found on a plate. Who ate her? No one knows. All that's known is the meat left a French slaughterhouse in November 2014" according to Le Parisien. The story states Rubis came from a program started in 2009 called "Green Mutton" within the scientific...
  • Footprints found on a remote B.C. island could be 13,000 years old -- the oldest in North America

    06/23/2015 12:01:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Canadian Press ^ | Tuesday, June 23, 2015 | Dirk Meissner
    Evidence of what could be the oldest footprints in North America has been discovered below the shoreline of a remote British Columbia island. Fossilized human footprints believed to be of a man, woman and child and estimated to be more than 13,000 years old were discovered at Calvert Island, which is located on B.C.'s central coast and is accessible only by boat or float plane. Remnants of an ancient campfire were found nearby. Archeologist Duncan McLaren said radiocarbon dating indicates the charcoal materials are 13,200 years old, and he is preparing to duplicate those tests to confirm the results... Fossilized...
  • The Wings of Man Unfolds its Wings: Eastern Airlines Returned Thursday with Flights To Cuba

    06/23/2015 11:56:41 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 11 replies
    Airways News ^ | May 28, 2015 | Chris Sloan
    With no announcement or fanfare, Eastern Airlines and HavanaAir quietly moved their inaugural revenue flights, MIA-HAV-HAV flight to today. Flight 3145, departed from Miami at 2:26pm EST according to FlightAware. Return flight 3146 arrived back in Miami from Havana’s Jose Marti International Airport at 5:05pm.
  • Scarlet Macaw Skeletons Point to Early Emergence of Pueblo Hierarchy

    06/23/2015 11:56:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    New work on the skeletal remains of scarlet macaws found in an ancient Pueblo settlement indicates that social and political hierarchies may have emerged in the American Southwest earlier than previously thought. Researchers determined that the macaws, whose brilliant red and blue feathers are highly prized in Pueblo culture, were persistently traded hundreds of miles north from Mesoamerica starting in the early 10th century, at least 150 years before the origin of hierarchy is usually attributed. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that the acquisition and control of macaws, along with other valued...
  • Gold Sun Disc from time of Stonehenge revealed to the public

    06/23/2015 11:48:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 19, 2015 | Wiltshire Museum
    Rare Bronze Age gold artifact found in burial mound in Wiltshire, U.K. For the first time, an early Bronze Age sun-disc from Monkton Farleigh in Wiltshire, U.K., is being exhibited for public view at the Wiltshire Museum, in time for this year's summer solstice. It is one of only 6 sun-disc finds and is one of the earliest metal objects found in Britain. Made in about 2,400 BC, soon after the sarsen stones were erected at Stonehenge, it is thought to represent the sun. The sun-disc was initially found in 1947 in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over...
  • Early European modern human had a close Neanderthal ancestor

    06/23/2015 11:44:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, Jun 22, 2015 | Max Planck Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    DNA analysis of a 40,000-year-old human jawbone from Romania suggests that an early modern group of humans interbred with Neanderthals soon after their first arrival in Europe. Researchers have concluded that an early modern human who lived in present-day Romania about 40,000 years ago had a Neanderthal ancestor who lived just 4 to 6 generations back in the individual's family tree. Co-led by Svante Pääbo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator David Reich at Harvard Medical School, along with researchers at the Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and...
  • (Stowaway) Cat Appears In Full Flight Out Of The Wing

    06/22/2015 2:53:54 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 49 replies
    About Cats-Paradise ^ | June 22, 2015 | Cats-Paradise
    Every pilot has to check a series of things to see if everything is safe to take-off. Checking for cats in wings is not in the manual but now can be added! Next time i bet this will be on his checklist. He was giving a fly lesson when the cat came out of the wing. Check out the video.
  • Students' invention offers germ-free door handle

    06/22/2015 9:04:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-22-2015 | Bob Yirka
    Two high school students, Sum Ming Wong and Kin Pong Li, both living in Hong Kong have designed and built a door handle that kills germs, thus preventing the spread of disease through hand contact. They demonstrated their handle at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair held last month in Pittsburgh—taking second place in the materials science category. One of the ways that ailments such as cold and flu are passed is via contact, and one of the main avenues is via door handles—a sick person coughs into their hand then uses the handle to enter a bathroom, office,...
  • A Second Triumphal Arch of Titus Discovered

    06/19/2015 5:28:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | June 11, 2015 | Estelle Reed
    Archaeologists in Rome have discovered the foundations of a second triumphal arch of Roman Emperor Titus, which was thought to be lost to history, the Telegraph reports. The arch once stood at the entrance to ancient Rome's chariot-racing stadium, the Circus Maximus. A member of the Flavian dynasty, Titus was emperor of Rome from 79 to 81 A.D. Even though he responded quickly with aid when Vesuvius erupted barely two months into his reign in 79 and is credited with completing the Colosseum in 80, it is the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem and his victory against the Jews...
  • US: VW and Audi try to impose diesel engines

    06/19/2015 1:35:52 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.inautonews.com ^ | June 18, 2015 | By Aurel Niculescu
    Germany’s VW AG has a mixed situation in the US – on one hand its luxury stablemate Audi is thriving and posting record sales each month, while on the other hand the mass-market brand is suffering. The company is a powerhouse in Europe, where it’s the largest automaker and thanks to China has also achieved the status of the second biggest carmaker in the world. Among the issues lie the fact that in the US the mass-market car brand VW has been sliding while the rest of the market is going up and the fact that Audi is indeed posting...
  • Award-winning Maryport Roman Temples Project begins its final dig at Hadrian's Wall

    06/19/2015 12:21:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Culture24 ^ | June 18, 2015 | Edward Lowton
    The final opportunity to visit the award-winning annual dig at the Maryport Roman Temples Project and learn about the excavation directly from lectures by the archaeologists involved has begun in Cumbria. The eight-week dig aims to explore Roman Maryport’s complex religious landscape and to learn more about the famous altars found at the site, on display in nearby Senhouse Roman Museum... The majority of the altars, dedicated annually by the commanders of the Roman fort, were found in an 1870 excavation by Humphrey Senhouse. Since then, the five year project, commissioned by the Senhouse Museum Trust and supported by Newcastle...