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Travel (General/Chat)

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  • The Top Four Candidates for Europe's Oldest Work of Art

    05/19/2012 6:34:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Smithsonian 'blogs ^ | May 16, 2012 | Erin Wayman
    In 1940, a group of teenagers discovered the paintings of bison, bulls and horses adorning the walls of France's Lascaux Cave. Roughly 17,000 years old, the paintings are Europe's most famous cave art, but hardly the oldest. This week archaeologists announced finding in another cave in France art dating to about 37,000 years ago, making it a candidate for Europe's most ancient artwork. Here's a look at the new discovery and the other top contenders for the title of Europe's oldest work of art. Nerja Caves (possibly about 43,000 years ago)... by Neanderthals, the [humans] that lived in this part...
  • Bronze Age 'Facebook' discovered by Cambridge experts

    05/19/2012 6:28:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Cambridge News ^ | May 2012 | Leanne Ehren
    Mark Sapwell believes he has discovered an 'archaic version' of social networking site Facebook. Mark Sapwell, who is a PhD archaeology student at St John's College, believes he has discovered an "archaic version" of the social networking site, where users share thoughts and emotions and give stamps of approval to other contributions -- similar to the Facebook "like". Images of animals and events were drawn on the rock faces in Russian and Northern Sweden to communicate with distant tribes and descendants during the Bronze Age. They form a timeline preserved in stone encompassing thousands of years. Mr Sapwell said: "Like...
  • New Paleolithic remains found near the Liuhuaishan site in Bose Basin, Guangxi

    05/19/2012 6:23:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | May 17, 2012 | Acta Anthropologica Sinica
    The Liuhuaishan site is an important early Paleolithic site found in the Bose Basin. In December 2008, Scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Youjiang Museum for Nationalities, Bose, carried out a short survey around this site and found three new Paleolithic localities with a collection of 37 stone artifacts. This new finds will help better understand the human behavior at open-air sites in south China, researchers reported in the latest issue of Acta Anthropologica Sinica 2012 (2). The stone artifact assemblage included cores, flakes, chunks, choppers and chopping tools, and picks,...
  • Scientists illuminate the ancient history of circumarctic peoples

    05/19/2012 6:17:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | May 17, 2012 | unattributed
    ...The team's results indicate several new genetic markers that define previously unknown branches of the family tree of circumarctic groups. One marker, found in the Inuvialuit but not the other two groups, suggests that this group arose from an Arctic migration event somewhere between 4,000 and 8,000 years ago, separate from the migration that gave rise to many of the speakers of the Na-Dene language group. "If we're correct, [this lineage] was present across the entire Arctic and in Beringia," Schurr said. "This means it traces a separate expansion of Eskimo-Aleut-speaking peoples across this region." ... "Perhaps the most extraordinary...
  • Photos: "Body Jars," Cliff Coffins Are Clues to Unknown Tribe [ Cambodia ]

    05/19/2012 6:06:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | May 15, 2012 | John Miksic
    Skulls and other human bones poke from large ceramic jars at Khnorng Sroal, one of the newly dated mountainside burials in southwestern Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains. The bones were placed in the 20-inch-tall (50-centimeter-tall) body jars only after the bodies had decomposed or had been picked clean by scavenging animals, according to the study, which is published in the latest issue of the journal Radiocarbon. "The Cardamom highlanders may have used some form of exposure of the body to de-flesh the bones, like the 'sky burials' known in other cultures," study leader Beavan said. Placing the sky-high burials couldn't have been...
  • Regarding Gas Prices.Could Prices Continue To Fall With A Possible Crude Glut?,2009 All Over Again?

    05/18/2012 8:21:16 PM PDT · by Reality_News · 45 replies
    Does anyone here have any insight of what is going on with the weekly drops in gas prices? Can we expect gas to finally drop below $3.00 a gallon before summer? Over the last few weeks,gas prices have been dropping a penny or two daily.Fox News mentioned that the demand in China has finally slowed down.What are the gas prices in your town? Lowest in Naples,Florida is $3.49.
  • Gun Manufacturers Rifle Making Suggestion

    05/18/2012 3:35:36 PM PDT · by Yosemitest · 154 replies
    me | May 18 2012 | Yosemitest
    Gun and Rifle manufacturers, I want your attention. I've been looking for a rifle/shotgun to take on a long hike, and there's not many choices. Take a look at Henry's U.S. Survival AR-7. It's a good product for backpacking, but too small on caliber. The fact that when it's packed inside its waterproof stock, it can float if dropped into water, and can be retrieved and will still work, is a great deciding factor. But being a .22LR is a detractor. Now take a look at the Rossi Circuit Judge and their many different variations. I like the 3-inch Magnum...
  • The Spirit Airline Boycotters Are The Real Thugs

    05/18/2012 8:04:20 AM PDT · by not romney · 5 replies
    Tea Party.org ^ | 5/18/12 | John Alan
    All the judge had to hear in the Spirit Airlines vs. Vietnam veteran case was, well just that, dying Vietnam war veteran vs. Spirit Airlines tightfisted CEO Ben Baldanza. In fact these were the precise terms used by Foxnews reporter J. Miller. However the judge in this case ended up being thirty thousand Facebookers threatening a boycott against Spirit Airlines. Jerry Meekins, a Vietnam vet and cancer patient was told by his doctor not to fly. Spirit Airlines is a no-frills airline and charges for 'every extra' in order to offer rock bottom prices. This is were the problem began....
  • The Spirit Airline Boycotters Are The Real Thugs

    05/18/2012 7:56:31 AM PDT · by not romney · 16 replies
    5/18/12 | John Alan
    All the judge had to hear in the Spirit Airlines vs. Vietnam veteran case was, well just that, dying Vietnam war veteran vs. Spirit Airlines tightfisted CEO Ben Baldanza. In fact these were the precise terms used by Foxnews reporter J. Miller. However the judge in this case ended up being thirty thousand Facebookers threatening a boycott against Spirit Airlines. Jerry Meekins, a Vietnam vet and cancer patient was told by his doctor not to fly. Spirit Airlines is a no-frills airline and charges for 'every extra' in order to offer rock bottom prices. This is were the problem began....
  • Italy Introduces Ferrari on Rails

    05/17/2012 11:23:24 PM PDT · by aquila48 · 8 replies
    Spiegel online international ^ | 04/24/2012 | Hans-Jürgen Schlamp
    Italy's burgundy red Ferrari on rails is finally going into service. Starting on April 28, the "Italo" will travel at speeds of up to 300 kilometers per hour between Milan, Rome and Naples. The new high-speed train is more environmentally friendly and also cheaper than its competitors -- on both the rails and roads.
  • Socialism

    05/17/2012 2:07:57 PM PDT · by pabianice · 5 replies
    Speech | 5/17/12 | Nguyen
    "The only difference between socialism and communism is an AK-47 aimed at your head. That was my experience."Quang Nguyen, Creative Director/Founder, Caddis Advertising, LLC Fled Vietnam in 1975 at age 13. From a speech he gave on Saturday, July 24th, 2010, in Prescott Valley , AZ. Nguyen had been asked to speak on his experience of coming to America and what it means. He spoke the following in dedication to all Vietnam Veterans.
  • 4 yak skulls from Tibet seized at Sea-Tac Airport

    05/16/2012 10:13:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    HeraldNet ^ | Thursday, May 10, 2012
    A traveler trying to bring four yak skulls back from Tibet was stopped at Sea-Tac Airport by a dog who smelled something funny. The traveler told Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists he found two of the skulls while hiking and bought two more at a village store. Two of the skulls still had dried flesh attached. They were in a duffel bag that drew the attention of a federal beagle named Woody. After the alert from Woody on April 30, the man declared he had the souvenir skulls, so he won't be prosecuted.
  • The oldest farming village in the Mediterranean islands is discovered in Cyprus

    05/15/2012 7:39:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | May 15, 2012 | CNRS
    Previously it was believed that, due to the island's geographic isolation, the first Neolithic farming societies did not reach Cyprus until a thousand years after the birth of agriculture in the Middle East... However, the discovery of Klimonas, a village that dates from nearly 9000 years before Christ, proves that early cultivators migrated to Cyprus from the Middle Eastern continent shortly after the emergence of agriculture there, bringing with them wheat as well as dogs and cats... The archaeologists have found a few votive offerings inside the building, including flint arrowheads and green stone beads. A great many remnants of...
  • Students find rare Roman temple on practice dig [Poppelsdorf, Germany]

    05/15/2012 9:33:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    The Local ^ | Friday, May 4, 2012 | jcw
    Lecturers at Bonn University had set up a mock archaeological dig at a building site on campus to teach hopeful historians digging techniques. What they did not expect to find were the 2,000-year-old foundations of a building, nestled into the dense, clayish mud. While the initial discovery was made in March, it was only in the past fortnight that the team realised the foundations were from a temple from the Roman era, the floor of which was scattered with broken pottery dating as far back as 800 BC. The building, which could have been part of a wealthy country estate,...
  • Warning signs from ancient Greek tsunami

    05/14/2012 3:27:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 19, 2012 | Nan Broadbent
    In the winter of 479 B.C., a tsunami was the savior of Potidaea, drowning hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village. New geological evidence suggests that the region may still be vulnerable to tsunami events, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues. The Greek historian Herodotus described the strange retreat of the tide and massive waves at Potidaea, making his account the first description of a historical tsunami. Reicherter and colleagues have added to the story by sampling sediments on the Possidi peninsula in northern Greece where Potidaea (and...
  • Neolithic farmers brought deer to Ireland

    05/14/2012 3:13:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Past Horizons Archaeology ^ | April 18, 2012 | School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin
    By comparing DNA from ancient bone specimens to DNA obtained from modern animals, the researchers discovered that the Kerry red deer are the direct descendants of deer present in Ireland 5000 years ago. Further analysis using DNA from European deer proves that Neolithic people from Britain first brought the species to Ireland. Although proving the red deer is not native to Ireland, researchers believe that the Kerry population is unique as it is directly related to the original herd and are worthy of special conservation status. Fossil bone samples from the National Museum of Ireland, some up to 30,000 years...
  • Honda Wins Appeals Decision in Civic Hybrid Lawsuit: How It Happened

    05/13/2012 6:10:34 PM PDT · by jjotto · 19 replies
    automotive.com ^ | May 9, 2012 | Jacob Brown
    After more than four months of legal battles, a Torrance, California, judge overturned the February 1 decision that awarded $9,867 to 2006 Honda Civic Hybrid owner Heather Peters. She won the judgment in California’s small claims court system, convincing the court that Honda made false claims about her car’s ability to achieve 50 mpg when, in reality, she reported her car achieving 29 mpg. Judge Dudley Gray II was nonplussed with the original decision, reversing it today. Because of California law, there can be no further appeals of the case. Regarding the ruling, Honda said in a statement, “We are...
  • 6,000-year-old settlement poses tsunami mystery

    05/13/2012 6:22:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Irish Examiner ^ | Wednesday, May 09, 2012 | Andrew Hamilton
    Archeologists have uncovered evidence of pre-farming people living in the Burren more than 6,000 years ago -- one of the oldest habitations ever unearthed in Ireland. Radiocarbon dating of a shellfish midden on Fanore Beach in north Clare have revealed it to be at least 6,000 years old -- hundreds of years older than the nearby Poulnabrone dolmen. The midden -- a cooking area where nomad hunter-gatherers boiled or roasted shellfish -- contained Stone Age implements, including two axes and a number of smaller stone tools... The midden was discovered by local woman Elaine O'Malley in 2009 and a major...
  • Unknown Ancient Language Found on Clay Tablet

    05/12/2012 11:32:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 54 replies
    Sci-News ^ | Fri, May 11th, 2012 | Enrico de Lazaro
    The archaeologists working at Ziyaret Tepe, the probable site of the ancient Assyrian city of Tushan, believe that this language may have been spoken by deportees originally from the Zagros Mountains, on the border of modern-day Iran and Iraq. In keeping with a policy widely practiced across the Assyrian Empire, these people may have been forcibly moved from their homeland and resettled in what is now south-east Turkey, where they would have been set to work building the new frontier city and farming its hinterland. The evidence for the language they spoke comes from a single clay tablet, which was...
  • Ford Mustang legend Carroll Shelby dies

    05/11/2012 1:18:15 PM PDT · by b4its2late · 61 replies
    Stangnet.com ^ | 5/11/2012 | Stangnet.com
    If you haven’t caught it yet on social media outlets, we’re here to share some sad news in the Ford Mustang world, everyone. As the headline states, we’ve lost Carroll Shelby from this land and he’s no doubt headed to the 1320′ strip in the clouds for the hereafter. Shelby passed away at age 89 yesterday, at Baylor Hospital in Dallas. As of this point, we know he was not doing well health-wise, but the official terminal cause has not been released. The automotive magnate of all things Mustang, and other Detroit muscle, will be sorely missed as one of...
  • Body found at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport

    05/10/2012 3:44:20 AM PDT · by sodpoodle · 9 replies
    Savannah Morning News ^ | May 10, 2012 | savannah morning news
    Savannah-Chatham police detectives were working with the Beaufort County, S.C., Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday night after a woman’s body was found on the second floor of a Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport economy parking lot earlier in the day.
  • Best Reubens In Los Angeles

    05/09/2012 2:44:43 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    cbs ^ | May 9, 2012 6:00 AM
    The popular corned beef sandwich with swiss cheese, sauerkraut and Russian dressing has a few different origin tales. Some say the reuben sandwich originated when the silent movie actress Anna Selos ordered a “combination” sandwich one late night in 1914 at Reuben’s Restaurant in New York. Others say it was the creation of Reuben Kulakofsky, a grocer from Omaha, Nebraska. Regardless, the reuben is one of the most revered sandwiches on any delicatessen menu. Everyone has a favorite and here are five of the top-rated Los Angeles restaurants to order this celebrated sandwich.
  • The Battle of Brunanburh -- The Great Debate

    05/06/2012 8:18:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Wirral Learning Grid ^ | since 2004 | Prof Stephen Harding
    By 937 A.D. 35 years after the initial settlement, Wirral may have been the site of a huge battle between the Anglo Saxons coming from the South and Midlands and a combined army of Viking raiders coming from Dublin and their Scottish allies coming mainly from Strathclyde. No-one is quite sure where this battle took place, although the majority of experts favour Wirral. The main reason is that the contemporary record of the Battle -- the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle describes the battle having taking place (around Brunanburh) -- which happens to be the old name for Bromborough... The Chronicle also...
  • "OKALOOSA ISLAND" Something To See

    05/06/2012 4:10:14 PM PDT · by Yosemitest · 55 replies
    experience and "www.panoramio.com" ^ | Saturday, May 6, 2012 | Yosemitest
    Are you tired of paying the high taxes of California, and watching the idiots in your State and Local Government squander your hard earned money? There are other places to live. And you should check them out. Think about it. Don't continue to be their slaves. MOVE! There are other areas to live, but California people love the beach, and at the Florida Panhandle, the water is warm.
  • Ancient Germany's Metal Traders

    05/06/2012 8:53:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Archaeology, v65, n 3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Andrew Curry
    ....May 11, 2011, Mario Küssner looked on as a bulldozer shaved a layer of soil a few inches deep from a roadside field near the eastern German village of Dermsdorf. Küssner, a staff archaeologist for the state of Thuringia, was brought in before the scheduled construction of a highway on-ramp would begin... the bulldozer uncovered something even more surprising -- a handful of dull green ax heads lying in the soil... careful work revealed a clay jar standing a foot-and-a-half tall packed with 100 bronze ax heads dating to the Bronze Age -- more than 3,000 years ago. The ax...
  • Woman mauled by cheetahs in South African game park ( Tame : LOL )

    05/04/2012 11:29:24 AM PDT · by george76 · 34 replies
    A woman tourist from Britain in a South African game park was mauled by two cheetahs in a horrific attack. Violet D'Mello was petting the "tame" cats in the petting area of Kragga Kamma Game Park with other tourists when they began attacking an eight-year-old girl. The woman watched in horror as they clawed and bit her leg ... Suddenly, the cheetahs left the girl and began eyeing the little girl's seven-year-old brother who was trying to flee. Just as D'Mello tried to intervene, the two animals turned their attention to her.
  • South Africa: Man Photographs Cheetahs Attacking Wife

    05/06/2012 7:55:05 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    The Seattle Times ^ | May 5, 2012 | The Associated Press
    South Africa: Man Photographs Cheetahs Attacking Wife The photos taken by a tourist from Scotland show his wife on the ground, hair flying, blood on her neck, with two cheetahs nearby (Violet D'Mello poses with a cheetah while being photographed by her husband Archibald during a visit to Kragga Kamma game reserve near Port Elizabeth, South Africa.) JOHANNESBURG — The photos taken by a tourist from Scotland show his wife on the ground, hair flying, blood on her neck, with two cheetahs nearby. The Port Elizabeth Herald reported Friday that Violet D'Mello of Aberdeen, Scotland, was attacked by cheetahs on...
  • Neanderthals in Color

    05/06/2012 7:48:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    Archaeology, v65, n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Zach Zorich
    In 1981, when Wil Roebroeks of Leiden University was beginning his archaeological career, he ran across some red stains in the grayish sediments on the floodplain of the Maas River where his team was excavating. The site, called Maastricht-Belvèdère, in The Netherlands, was occupied by Neanderthals at least 200,000 years ago. Roebroeks collected and stored samples of the red stains, and 30 years later he received funding to analyze them. It became apparent that he and his team had discovered the earliest evidence of hominins using the mineral iron oxide, also known as ocher. Until now, the use of...
  • Rethinking the Thundering Hordes

    05/06/2012 7:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Archaeology, v65 n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Andrew Lawler
    Vast stretches of Central Asia feel eerily uninhabited. Fly at 30,000 feet over... Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan -- and there are long moments when no town or road or field is visible from your window. Wandering bands and tribes roamed this immense area for 5,000 years, herding goat, sheep, cattle, and horses across immense steppes, through narrow valleys, and over high snowy passes. They left occasional tombs that survived the ages, and on rare occasions settled down and built towns or even cities. But for the most part, these peoples left behind few physical traces of their origins, beliefs, or ways...
  • Games Ancient People Played [ 3000 BC Mexico ]

    05/06/2012 7:18:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Archaeology, v65 n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Barbara Voorhies
    The site of Tlacuachero in southern Mexico is an island in a mangrove swamp made up almost entirely of clamshells. Material recovered from the site shows that it was a place where people harvested shellfish and fish between 5,050 and 4,230 years ago -- long before the great civilizations of Mesoamerica would build their city-states. Over the years, the island grew as clams were harvested from the swamp and the shells were discarded there. While the shell mound was accumulating, the early people at Tlacuachero built several superimposed clay floors at the island center to create smooth surfaces that were...
  • Man finds turtle with son's initials on it [after 47 years]

    05/06/2012 3:25:51 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 66 replies
    UPI.com ^ | May 5, 2012 | staff reporter
    SOUTH STRABANE, Pa., May 5 (UPI) -- A Pennsylvania man said he recently found a live turtle his son carved his initials into 47 years ago. Holland Cokeley, 85, was walking in the woods behind his South Strabane home with his neighbor's dog when the dog found the turtle, KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh, reported Friday. "I picked it up, and I thought, 'Oh geez, this is Jeff's turtle!'" said Cokeley. "It's been here for 47 years, and it still has the same markings on it!"
  • Ancient network of rivers and lakes found in Arabian Desert

    05/03/2012 3:57:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | May 1, 2012 | Oxford University
    Satellite images have revealed that a network of ancient rivers once coursed their way through the sand of the Arabian Desert, leading scientists to believe that the region experienced wetter periods in the past... Over the course of five years the researchers will study the landscape features and excavate sites of likely archaeological interest, using the network of water courses as a map. They will use the latest dating techniques to pinpoint the ages of fossils of animals, plants and different stone tool technologies and compare the similarities and differences displayed in the region's rock art. The team's main focus...
  • Hebrew seal bearing the name 'Matanyahu' uncovered in Jerusalem

    05/03/2012 3:51:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs ^ | 1 May 2012 | Israel Antiquities Authority
    The remains of a building dating to the end of the First Temple period were discovered below the base of the ancient drainage channel that is currently being exposed in Israel Antiquities Authority excavations beneath Robinson's Arch in the Jerusalem Archaeological Garden, adjacent to the Western Wall of the Temple Mount. This building is the closest structure to the First Temple found to date in archaeological excavations. According to Eli Shukron, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "the name Matanyahu, like the name Netanyahu, means giving to God. These names are mentioned several times in the...
  • Synchrotron scientists and international team reveal tales told by old bones

    05/03/2012 12:47:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | April 30, 2012 | U of Saskatchewan
    Using the presence of trace amounts of lead and strontium as clues, the team is using the CLS to hunt for the presence of these elements in tiny shards of bones from sailors and others interred in a Royal Navy cemetery in the late 1700s to early 1800s. The work is published online in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Bone is a living tissue, formed as we grow and healing after it breaks. It is also constantly being rebuilt and recycled by the body. As new bone is laid down, there is the chance that metals in the body will...
  • Otzi the Iceman: scientists find 5,000-year-old blood sample

    05/03/2012 12:42:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday, May 2, 2012 | Tom Kington
    As cold cases go, it does not get much colder than Ötzi the Iceman, whose body was found frozen solid in the Italian Alps 5,300 years after he died from an arrow wound. Since he was discovered by trekkers in 1991, scientists have mapped his DNA and figured out everything from what ailments he suffered from (Lyme disease and a weak heart) to the last meal he ate (venison and ibex) before he was shot in the back, probably by an enemy tribesman. Now, using advanced nanotechnology, they have located traces of Ötzi's blood, the oldest blood sample ever retrieved....
  • Pack and Go - Traveling with Heat

    05/02/2012 9:47:20 PM PDT · by BookaT · 18 replies
    Here is a nice little tool to plan your summer vacation with. If you don't have solid summer plans this might aid you in planning, to make sure you patronize states that get it. http://apps.carryconcealed.net/packngo/
  • America's worst airports

    05/02/2012 8:19:19 AM PDT · by C19fan · 54 replies
    Travel + Leisure ^ | April 17, 2012 | Everett Potter
    Outdated infrastructure, overcrowding, chronic delays, and demoralized staff: That’s what you’ll find in some of America’s worst airports, according to readers of Travel + Leisure. In our first-ever airport survey, we asked readers to rate America’s 22 major airports in seven categories: flight delays; design; amenities; food and drink; check-in and security; service; and transportation and location. The best-scoring airports have tackled these issues head-on, refurbishing terminals and adding amenities that make the worst airports look evermore outdated by comparison.
  • Jay Leno's Garage profiles american-designed cafe racer

    05/01/2012 5:51:37 PM PDT · by bagadonutz · 6 replies
    Jay Leno's garage ^ | 04/23/2012 | Jay Leno
    Jay Leno profiles Ryca Motors located in southern CA. They provide a kit to create a cafe racer from the venerable Suzuki Savage 650cc single.
  • Jay Leno's Garage profiles american-designed cafe racer

    05/01/2012 5:51:17 PM PDT · by bagadonutz · 4 replies
    Jay Leno's garage ^ | 04/23/2012 | Jay Leno
    Jay Leno profiles Ryca Motors located in southern CA. They provide a kit to create a cafe racer from the venerable Suzuki Savage 650cc single.
  • 'Your' Car Won't Be After 2015

    04/30/2012 5:10:46 PM PDT · by Twotone · 59 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | April 25, 2012 | Eric Peters
    Mandatory "Event Data Recorders" will even know you're speeding in reverse. After a certain point, it's not paranoia. The latest brick in the wall is the predictably named "Moving Ahead For Progress in the 21st Century Act," also known as Senate Bill 1813. (See here for the full text of the bill itself; the relevant section is 31406.) This legislation -- already passed by the Senate and likely to be passed by the House -- will impose a legal requirement that all new cars made beginning with the 2015 models be fitted with so-called Event Data Recorders (EDRs). These are...
  • Might be headed to Concord, NC

    04/30/2012 3:58:34 AM PDT · by eyedigress · 31 replies
    now | eyedigress
    If you NC FReepers have some advice I would sure appreciate it. I need to be in a location within 30mi north of Charlotte and preferably within 10mi of the Interstate. I do not know the area. This could happen in 8 weeks and my beautiful Tennessee home will be put on the lease market. Cheers!
  • MtDNA tests trace all modern horses back to single ancestor 140,000 years ago

    04/29/2012 5:53:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | January 31, 2012 | Bob Yirka
    For many years archeologists and other scientists have debated the origins of the domesticated horse. Nailing down a time frame is important because many historians view the relationship between man and horse as one of the most important in the development of our species. Horses allowed early people to hunt for faster prey, to wander farther than before and to create much bigger farms due to pulling plows. Now, new evidence has come to light suggesting that all modern horses, which are believed to have been domesticated approximately 10,000 years ago, descended from one mare around 140,000 years ago. The...
  • Three-toed horses reveal the secret of the Tibetan Plateau uplift

    04/29/2012 3:17:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Tuesday, April 24, 2012 | Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    The Tibetan Plateau has gradually risen since the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate at about 55 Ma. Regardless of the debates over the rising process and elevation of the plateau, there is no doubt that the Himalayas have appeared as a mountain range since the Miocene, with the appearance of vegetation vertical zones following thereafter. Open grasslands per se have no direct relationship to elevation, because they can have different elevations in different regions of the world, having a distribution near the sea level to the extreme high plateaus. On the other hand, the southern margin of the...
  • Ancient Egyptian Mummy Suffered Rare and Painful Disease

    04/28/2012 7:44:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    Around 2,900 years ago, an ancient Egyptian man, likely in his 20s, passed away after suffering from a rare, cancerlike disease that may also have left him with a type of diabetes. When he died he was mummified, following the procedure of the time. The embalmers removed his brain (through the nose it appears), poured resin-like fluid into his head and pelvis, took out some of his organs and inserted four linen "packets" into his body. At some point the mummy was transferred to the 2,300 year-old sarcophagus of a woman named Kareset, an artifact that is now in the...
  • Smuggled Cargo Found on Ancient Roman Ship

    04/28/2012 7:12:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Following an analysis of the jars and their contents, Tusa and colleagues concluded that the 52- by 16-foot ship was sailing from North Africa when she sank some 1,700 years ago, probably while trying to enter the local river Birgi. In North Africa the vaulting tubes cost a quarter of what builders paid for them in Rome. "It was a somewhat tolerated smuggling activity, used by sailors to round their poor salaries. They bought these small tubes cheaper in Africa, hid them everywhere within the ship, and then re-sold them in Rome," Tusa said. According to Frank Sear, professor of...
  • World’s Deadliest Golf Course Boasts Land Mines and Man-Bear-Pigs (Korean DMZ Combat Golf)

    04/28/2012 9:14:56 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 35 replies
    IO9 ^ | April 28, 2012 | By Lauren Davis
    World’s deadliest golf course boasts land mines and man-bear-pigs Along the DMZ, golf is not a sport for the faint of heart. The golf course at Camp Bonifas, just south of the Korean demilitarized zone, boasts just one hole, but what it lacks in quantity it more than makes up for in hazards. Live land mines line the course, and bizarre animals stumble out from the woods. Formerly Camp Kitty Hawk, United Nations Command post Camp Bonifas was renamed in 1986 to honor Captain Arthur G. Bonifas, who had been axe murdered in 1976 during a conflict with North Korea...
  • Ancient hero stone with inscriptions unearthed

    04/28/2012 8:01:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    The Hindu ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Special Correspondent
    An ancient hero stone with inscriptions has been unearthed at Karattampatti near Thuraiyur, about 35 km from here. The hero stone was discovered from a field at a village during a field study taken up by a research team led by Subash Chandira Bose, advisor for the archaeological wing of the Centre for Cultural Studies, Coimbatore, following a tip-off given by Durairaj, a local resident. Mr.Bose, in a press release, said the bas-relief hero stone measuring 30 centimetres in width and 92 centimetres in height has been carved within a rectangular vertical frame with excellent craftsmanship. It depicts a warrior...
  • Israeli researcher: Mikvehs show that Galilee cave dwellers were likely kohanim

    04/28/2012 7:56:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | Friday, April 27, 2012 | Eli Ashkenazi
    The caves in which the purification baths were found were 'caves of refuge,' where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule. A fifth mikveh has been found in the caves on the Galilee's Cliffs of Arbel, indicating that the people who lived there under Roman rule were most likely kohanim, Jews of the priestly class, said Yinon Shivtiel, one of the researchers who found the ritual bath... The caves in which the purification baths were found were "caves of refuge," where Jews who lived in the area sought shelter under Roman rule, particularly during the Jewish...
  • Bones of early American disappear from underwater cave

    04/28/2012 7:49:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Frank Nowikowski
    One of the first humans to inhabit the Americas has been stolen -- and archaeologists want it back. The skeleton, which is probably at least 10,000 years old, has disappeared from a cenote, or underground water reservoir, in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In response, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) in Mexico City has placed "wanted" posters in supermarkets, bakeries and dive shops in and around the nearby town of Tulum. They are also considering legal action to recover the remains. The missing bones belong to a skeleton dubbed Young Man of Chan Hol II, discovered in 2010. The...
  • Ancient Temple Discovered in Messinia

    04/28/2012 4:54:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | April 24, 2012 | Areti Kotseli
    Archaeological research reveals an ancient temple in the mountains between Ilia and Messinia, opposite the well-known imposing temple of Epicurean Apollo. The area around the newly discovered temple was full of architectural tools that were used to build a small temple, while former head of the 38th Ephorate of Antiquities, archaeologist Dr. Xeni Arapogianni explains that when the small temple was demolished in order to build a new one, topmasts, triglyphs and other parts of the ancient temple were found. The excavation started back in 2010, revealing the temple as well as bronze items and a great number of...