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Keyword: triassic

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  • Ancient “Monster” Insect Found

    10/29/2009 10:40:11 AM PDT · by null and void · 17 replies · 1,332+ views
    Ancient “Monster” Insect Found Fly in amber: This ancient "unicorn" fly that lived 100 million years ago in Burma has a "horn" in the center of its forehead, capped with three small eyes. Courtesy of George Poinar Researchers have announced the discovery of a new, real-world “monster” — what they are calling a “unicorn” fly — that lived about 100 million years ago and is being described as a new family, genus and species of fly never before observed. A single, incredibly well-preserved specimen of the tiny but scary-looking fly was preserved for eternity in Burmese amber. It had...
  • Meteor mega-hit spawned Australian continent: researchers

    06/03/2006 3:23:27 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies · 774+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 6/2/06 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) - A meteor's roaring crash into Antarctica -- larger and earlier than the impact that killed the dinosaurs -- caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history and likely spawned the Australian continent, scientists said. Ohio State University scientists said the 483-kilometer-wide (300-mile-wide) crater is now hidden more than 1.6 kilometers (one mile) beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. "Gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out," the university said in a statement Thursday....
  • Mystery solved: Why large dinosaurs avoided the tropics for millions of years

    06/20/2015 1:31:56 PM PDT · by ETL · 66 replies
    FoxNews.com/science ^ | June 17, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    New research has revealed why it took more than 30 million years for large Triassic dinosaurs to populate the tropics after they first appeared on Earth, ending a mystery that has kept researchers baffled for decades. Using new geological evidence culled from Ghost Ranch, N.M., researchers from the University of Southampton in the U.K. have found that an extremely unpredictable hot and arid climate due to elevated carbon dioxide levels (four to six times of what they are today) kept large herbivorous dinos at bay until after 200 million years ago.
  • The Biggest Extinction on Earth (Mother Nature is not your friend)

    04/04/2007 5:54:02 AM PDT · by Valin · 17 replies · 879+ views
    First Science ^ | 3/30/07 | Naomi Miles
    Around 250 million years ago, a huge volcanic eruption triggered a deadly series of events that wiped out 95% of all species on Earth. Scientists have been piecing together the story of what happened. Our planet has a troubled and turbulent past: five catastrophic natural events have caused mass extinctions of life on Earth. Perhaps the most famous one is the asteroid impact that caused the demise of the dinosaurs. But the most extensive extinction event occurred even before dinosaurs were around. In the Permian era, about 250 million years ago, a destructive volcanic eruption radically altered conditions on Earth...
  • Video: Research team discovers plant fossils previously unknown to Antarctica

    05/23/2015 12:10:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 30, 2015 | National Science Foundation
    Sometime about 220 million years ago, a meandering stream flowed here and plants grew along its banks. Something, as yet unknown, caused sediment to flood the area rapidly, which helped preserve the plants. Gulbranson splits open a grey slab of siltstone in the quarry to reveal amazingly well-preserved Triassic plant fossils, as if the leaves and stems had been freshly pressed into the rock only yesterday. "It's a mixture of plants that don't exist anymore," he says, "but we have some plants in these fossil ecosystems that we might know today, like ginkgo." On the one end are fossils from...
  • Fact or Fiction?: Dark Matter Killed the Dinosaurs

    04/02/2015 10:15:04 PM PDT · by grundle · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 25, 2015 | Lee Billings
    A new out-of-this-world theory links mass extinctions with exotic astrophysics and galactic architecture Every once in a great while, something almost unspeakable happens to Earth. Some terrible force reaches out and tears the tree of life limb from limb. In a geological instant, countless creatures perish and entire lineages simply cease to exist. The most famous of these mass extinctions happened about 66 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out in the planet-wide environmental disruption that followed a mountain-sized space rock walloping Earth. We can still see the scar from the impact today as a nearly 200-kilometer-wide crater in...
  • Ocean hot in days of dinosaurs, study finds

    02/18/2006 7:38:53 AM PST · by worldclass · 43 replies · 935+ views
    Sometimes we make that first dash into the ocean on summer vacation and happily announce, "It's warm as bathwater." But a new study based on ancient sediments collected off South America indicates that the tropical Atlantic Ocean really did hit temperatures as high as 107 degrees Fahrenheit back when dinosaurs ruled. The finding, reported Friday by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, also estimates that carbon dioxide made up as much as six times more of the atmosphere at that time than it does today.
  • Dinosaur footprint found in Alaska national park

    07/06/2005 1:37:52 AM PDT · by phoenix_004 · 11 replies · 464+ views
    Reuters ^ | Jul 5, 2005
    A recently discovered fossilized footprint shows that dinosaurs once roamed in what is now a national park in Alaska, scientists said on Tuesday. The footprint, estimated to be 70 million years old, was discovered on June 27, the first evidence of dinosaurs ever found in Denali National Park and Preserve, the National Park Service said. The find was made by a University of Alaska Fairbanks student attending a field camp in the park. The three-toed track, six inches wide and nine inches long, appears to be from the left foot of a therapod, a class of two-legged predators, said Anthony...
  • Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid?

    04/05/2003 9:39:18 PM PST · by SteveH · 19 replies · 493+ views
    Discovery News ^ | April 3, 2003 | Larry O'Hanlon
    Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid? By Larry O'Hanlon, Discovery News April 3, 2003 — The evidence is still skimpy, but there is a chance that the dino killer asteroid was not alone when it walloped the Earth 65 million years ago. A possible second crater, at least as big or bigger than the famous Chicxulub crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, may have been created by a second hit moments after Chicxulub and off the coast of Maine. "It probably is a crater, but we really don't have age data," said marine geologist Dallas Abbott Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia...
  • Jurassic 'squirrels' push back clock on emergence of mammals

    09/17/2014 5:26:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 10, 2014 | Pete Spotts
    In placing three newly discovered species along the mammal family tree, researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago... Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs. In placing these creatures along the mammal family tree, the researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago, during the Triassic period. If the results hold up to additional scrutiny, they imply a...
  • EARTH was a BAKING LIFELESS DESERT for 5 MILLION years

    10/19/2012 9:11:14 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    The Register ^ | 10/19/2012 | By Brid-Aine Parnell
    Boffins have discovered that "lethally hot" ocean temperatures kept the Earth devoid of life for millions of years after the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago. The global wipeout that ended the Permian era, before dinosaurs, wiped out nearly all of the world's species. Mass extinctions like these in Earth's history are usually followed by a "dead zone", a period of tens of thousands of years before new species crop up. But the early Triassic dead zone lasted millions of years, not thousands. Boffins now reckon that the extra-long five million year dead zone was caused by screaming...
  • Toxic Gases Caused World's Worst Extinction

    02/04/2009 1:26:44 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 38 replies · 2,252+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 2/4/09 | Michael Reilly
    Feb. 4, 2009 -- An ancient killer is hiding in the remote forests of Siberia. Walled off from western eyes during the Soviet era and forgotten among the endless expanse of wilderness, scientists are starting to uncover the remnants of a supervolcano that rained Hell on Earth 250 million years ago and killed 90 percent of all life. Researchers have known about the volcano -- the Siberian Traps, for years. And they've speculated that the volcanic rocks, which cover an area about the size of Alaska, played a role in runaway global warming that led to the end -- Permian...
  • Giant Prehistoric Toilet Unearthed

    11/30/2013 8:45:23 AM PST · by SatinDoll · 33 replies
    BBC News Science and Environment ^ | Nov. 28, 2013 | James Morgan
    Each poo is a time capsule to the dawn of the dinosaurs. A gigantic "communal latrine" created at the dawn of the dinosaurs has been unearthed in Argentina. Thousands of fossilised poos left by rhino-like megaherbivores were found clustered together, scientists say. The 240-million-year-old site is the "world's oldest public toilet" and the first evidence that ancient reptiles shared collective dumping grounds. The dung contains clues to prehistoric diet, disease and vegetation says a study in Scientific Reports. Continue reading the main story [snip]
  • Oddest couple ever found: Amphibian and mammal forerunner share 250 million year old burrow

    06/23/2013 7:20:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Phys.org ^ | June 21, 2013 | unattributed
    Scientists from South Africa, Australia and France have discovered a world first association while scanning a 250 million year old fossilized burrow from the Karoo Basin of South Africa. The burrow revealed two unrelated vertebrate animals nestled together and fossilized after being trapped by a flash flood event. Facing harsh climatic conditions subsequent to the Permo-Triassic (P-T) mass extinction, the amphibian Broomistega and the mammal forerunner Thrinaxodon cohabited in a burrow. Scanning shows that the amphibian, which was suffering from broken ribs, crawled into a sleeping mammal's shelter for protection. This research suggests that short periods of dormancy, called aestivation,...
  • Seven Fossil-hunting Expeditions in Tanzania, Zambia Yield Surprising Results

    05/05/2013 12:44:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Tuesday, April 30, 2013 | unattributed
    Prof Christian Sidor and his colleagues headed by Dr Linda Tsuji, also from the University of Washington, created two ‘snapshots’ of four legged-animals about 5 million years before and again about 10 million years after the Earth’s largest mass extinction (about 252 million years ago). Prior to the extinction event, for example, the pig-sized Dicynodon was a dominant plant-eating species across southern Pangea. Pangea is the name given to the landmass when all the world’s continents were joined together. Southern Pangea was made up of what is today Africa, South America, Antarctica, Australia and India. After the mass extinction at...
  • New Species of Thalattosaur Discovered

    04/03/2013 6:34:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Science News ^ | April 3, 2013 | Sergio Prostak
    Chinese paleontologists led by Dr Tao He from the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History in Hangzhou have identified a new species of thalattosaur from a fossil found in the Xiaowa Formation of Guanling, China. Thalattosaurs (meaning ‘ocean lizards’) were a group of prehistoric marine reptiles that lived during the mid and late Triassic period in North America and Eurasia. They resembled large, up to 13 feet (4 m) in length, aquatic lizards, with long, flexible bodies and short limbs. Dr He’s team has described a new species of thalattosaur, named Concavispina biseridens, in the latest issue of the Journal of...
  • Prehistoric tiny bugs found trapped in amber

    08/28/2012 8:29:13 AM PDT · by null and void · 26 replies
    WTOP ^ | 8/28/12 | SETH BORENSTEIN
    This undated handout photo provided by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and the University of Göttingen shows photomicrographs of the two new species of ancient gall mites in 230-million-year-old amber droplets from northeastern Italy. The gall mites were named: Triasacarus fedelei, left, and Ampezzoa triassica. (AP Photo/A. Schmidt, University of Göttingen, Proceedings of the National Academy) • WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found three well preserved ancient insects frozen in amber — and time — in what is Earth's oldest bug trap. The discoveries of amber-encased insects in Italy may sound like something out of "Jurassic Park"...
  • It Took Earth Ten Million Years to Recover from Greatest Mass Extinction

    05/28/2012 7:25:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | May 27, 2012 | University of Bristol
    It took some 10 million years for Earth to recover from the greatest mass extinction of all time, latest research has revealed. Life was nearly wiped out 250 million years ago, with only 10 per cent of plants and animals surviving. It is currently much debated how life recovered from this cataclysm, whether quickly or slowly. Recent evidence for a rapid bounce-back is evaluated in a new review article by Dr Zhong-Qiang Chen, from the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan, and Professor Michael Benton from the University of Bristol. They find that recovery from the crisis lasted some 10...
  • Earth's massive extinction: The story gets worse

    01/07/2012 6:23:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies
    PhyOrg ^ | January 5, 2012 | University of Calgary
    Scientists have uncovered a lot about the Earth's greatest extinction event that took place 250 million years ago when rapid climate change wiped out nearly all marine species and a majority of those on land. Now, they have discovered a new culprit likely involved in the annihilation: an influx of mercury into the eco-system. "No one had ever looked to see if mercury was a potential culprit. This was a time of the greatest volcanic activity in Earth's history and we know today that the largest source of mercury comes from volcanic eruptions," says Dr. Steve Grasby, co-author of a...
  • New Suspect in 'Great Dying': Massive Prehistoric Coal Explosion

    12/22/2011 11:59:36 AM PST · by decimon · 45 replies
    Live Science ^ | December 22, 2011 | Jennifer Welsh
    A great explosive burning of coal set fire and made molten by lava bubbling from the Earth's mantle , looking akin to Kuwait's giant oil fires but lasting anywhere from centuries to millennia, could have been the cause of the world's most-devastating mass extinction, new research suggests. The event, called the Great Dying, occurred 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian period. "The Great Dying was the biggest of all the mass extinctions," said study researcher Darcy Ogden of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. "Estimates suggest up to 96 percent of all marine species...