Keyword: turkanaboy

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  • Finds test human origins theory

    08/08/2007 10:58:39 AM PDT · by Domandred · 103 replies · 1,594+ views
    BBC News ^ | James Urquhart
    Two hominid fossils discovered in Kenya are challenging a long-held view of human evolution. The broken upper jaw-bone and intact skull from humanlike creatures, or hominids, are described in Nature. Previously, the hominid Homo habilis was thought to have evolved into the more advanced Homo erectus, which evolved into us. Now, habilis and erectus are now thought to be sister species that overlapped in time. The new fossil evidence reveals an overlap of about 500,000 years during which Homo habilis and Homo erectus must have co-existed in the Turkana basin area, the region of East Africa where the fossils were...
  • Redating Leakey’s Ethiopian human finds: more problems for compromise

    02/20/2005 11:44:15 AM PST · by DannyTN · 4 replies · 377+ views
    AnswersinGenesis.com ^ | 02/18/05 | Carl Wieland, AiG–Australia
    In mid-2003 we published an article on the finding of specimens named Homo sapiens idŕltu near Herto, Ethiopia—see Ethiopian ‘earliest humans’ find—pointing out how these finds were a serious blow to long-age compromise on Genesis history. As the main species name given to these fossils indicates, they were clearly human, in both our opinion and that of the bulk of the secular science community. The fact that they shared some so-called ‘primitive’ characteristics with e.g. Homo erectus and/or Neandertal (and/or ‘archaic sapiens’) specimens only confirmed our view that all of these so-called ‘earlier’ types are part of the same biological...
  • Humans Shaped Stone Axes 1.8 Million Years Ago: Advanced Tool-Making Methods Pushed Back in Time

    09/10/2011 8:30:28 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 51 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 09/01/2011
    A new study suggests that Homo erectus, a precursor to modern humans, was using advanced toolmaking methods in East Africa 1.8 million years ago, at least 300,000 years earlier than previously thought. The study, recently published in Nature, raises new questions about where these tall and slender early humans originated and how they developed sophisticated tool-making technology. Homo erectus appeared about 2 million years ago, and ranged across Asia and Africa before hitting a possible evolutionary dead-end, about 70,000 years ago. Some researchers think Homo erectus evolved in East Africa, where many of the oldest fossils have been found, but...
  • Ancient Human Fossils Show Women Much Smaller

    08/09/2007 1:18:21 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 918+ views
    Reuters ^ | 8-9-2007
    Ancient human fossils show women much smaller Thu Aug 9, 2007 10:18AM EDT NAIROBI (Reuters) - Homo erectus, long viewed as a crucial evolutionary link between modern humans and their tree-dwelling ancestors, may have been more ape-like than previously thought, scientists unveiling new-found fossils said on Thursday. Revealing an ancient skull and a jawbone from two early branches of the human family tree -- Homo erectus and Homo habilis -- a team of Kenyan scientists said they were surprised to find that early female hominids were much smaller than males. The skull was the first discovery of a female Homo...
  • Kenya: Evangelicals Wage Anti-Evolution War

    01/12/2007 9:46:52 PM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 20 replies · 486+ views
    The East African Standard ^ | January 12, 2007 | Eric Wamanji
    A bronze sculpture at the entrance of the Museum. It details the development of man. Kenya's world-class collection of hominid bones - primates belonging to a family of which the modern human being is the only species still in existence - is at the centre of a silent but intense war being waged by a section of the evangelical churches. The priceless National Museums of Kenya (NMK) fossils pointing to man's evolution risk being relegated to the abyss as a section of the Church renews its war on science insisting that the evolution theory contradicts the biblical story of creation....
  • Humans shaped stone axes 1.8 million years ago, study says

    09/02/2011 2:05:06 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 08-31-2011 | Provided by Columbia University
    A new study suggests that Homo erectus, a precursor to modern humans, was using advanced toolmaking methods in East Africa 1.8 million years ago, at least 300,000 years earlier than previously thought. The study, published this week in Nature, raises new questions about where these tall and slender early humans originated and how they developed sophisticated tool-making technology. Homo erectus appeared about 2 million years ago, and ranged across Asia and Africa before hitting a possible evolutionary dead-end, about 70,000 years ago. Some researchers think Homo erectus evolved in East Africa, where many of the oldest fossils have been found,...
  • Scientists Push Back the Clock on Early Human Finds

    12/03/2013 7:08:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | December 01, 2013 | unattributed
    New dating indicates... a well-known group of early Homo (early human) fossils discovered in previous investigations at Koobi Fora in the Turkana Basin of East Africa have an age range that is older than previously estimated. Led by archaeologist Josephine C.A. Joordens of the Netherlands' Leiden University, the researchers combined magnetostratigraphy and strontium (Sr) isotope stratigraphy techniques to develop a new age constraint range for 15 selected hominin fossils found in deposits on the Karari Ridge of the Koobi Fora region in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). Magnetostratigraphy measures the polarity of Earth's changing magnetic field at the time a...
  • Ancient boy's skeleton sparks evolution debate (In Kenya)

    02/06/2007 5:54:32 PM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 607 replies · 6,894+ views
    CNN ^ | February 6, 2007 | Staff
    Deep in the dusty, unlit corridors of Kenya's national museum, locked away in a plain-looking cabinet, is one of mankind's oldest relics: Turkana Boy, as he is known, the most complete skeleton of a prehistoric human ever found. But his first public display later this year is at the heart of a growing storm -- one pitting scientists against Kenya's powerful and popular evangelical Christian movement. The debate over evolution vs. creationism -- once largely confined to the United States -- has arrived in a country known as the cradle of mankind. "I did not evolve from Turkana Boy or...