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Keyword: tuscany

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  • Etruscan Code Uncracked

    07/09/2016 1:51:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An inscribed stone slab unearthed at an Etruscan site in Tuscany is proving to contain one of the most difficult texts to decipher. It was believed that the sixth-century B.C. stela would shed light on the still-mysterious Etruscan language, but so far it remains a puzzle. “To be honest, I’m not yet sure what type of text was incised on the stela,” says Rex Wallace, professor of classics at the University of Massachusetts. Inscribed with vertical dots and at least 70 legible letters, the four-foot-tall and two-foot-wide slab had been buried for more than 2,500 years in the foundations of...
  • Text in lost language may reveal god or goddess worshipped by Etruscans at ancient temple:

    03/29/2016 5:41:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    SMU Research Home ^ | 3/28/2016 | SMU
    Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. The lengthy text is inscribed on a large 6th century BCE sandstone slab that was uncovered from an Etruscan temple. A new religious artifact is rare. Most Etruscan discoveries typically have been grave and funeral objects. “This is probably going to be a sacred text, and will be remarkable for telling us about the early belief system of a lost culture that is fundamental to western traditions,” said archaeologist...
  • Tomb excavations uncover treasures of an Etruscan princess [Egyptian gold scarab]

    03/11/2016 12:42:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    ANSA ^ | March 8, 2016 | unatributed
    Excavations of a tomb in northern Lazio dating to around the 8th century BC have uncovered treasures including an amber necklace, a golden Egyptian scarab amulet and rare pottery that archaeologists say likely belonged to an Etruscan princess. The excavation of the Tomb of the Golden Scarab follows its discovery earlier this year in the archaeological site of Vulci, a former Etruscan city. Anthropological research helped back the theory that the tomb belonged to a princess within the ranks of the nascent Etruscan aristocracy. A few bones wrapped in precious cloth are all that remains of her. The excavation of...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found What Was Once The Biggest City In Italy

    11/07/2004 5:27:22 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 2,055+ views
    The Economist ^ | 11-4-2004
    Scientific treasure hunters Nov 4th 2004 | CLUSIUM, OR POSSIBLY NOT From The Economist print edition Archaeologists may have found what was once the biggest city in Italy REAL archaeology bears about as much resemblance to an Indiana Jones movie as real spying bears to James Bond. Excavation—at least if it is to be meaningfully different from grave robbing—is a matter of painstaking trowel work, not gung-ho gold-grabbing. But there is still a glimmer of the grave robber in many archaeologists, and the search for a juicy royal tomb can stimulate more than just rational, scientific instincts. Few tombs would...
  • The Sword in the Stone at the Monte Siepi Chapel

    12/08/2015 11:55:37 AM PST · by Talisker · 47 replies
    Historic Mysteries ^ | JULY 26, 2011 | Shelly Barclay
    Judging by a real artifact, the sword in the stone legend may be partially based on true events. No one pulled a sword from a stone and went on to become a king, as far as we know. In fact, the sword that exists in reality rather than legend is still stuck in its stone. However, there is no denying that such a sword exists. The stone and sword in question are located at Monte Siepi Chapel in the San Galgano Abbey in Tuscany. The abbey is in Italy and the history of it has naught to do with England....
  • Roman Villa Reopens on Wild Tuscan Island

    07/02/2015 11:34:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, July 2, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The remains of one of the most prestigious maritime villas from Roman times are set to reopen July 2 in a small, almost uninhabited island off the Tuscan coast after been locked for 15 years. Commonly known as "Villa Domitia," the imperial complex stood magnificently 2,000 years ago on the island of Giannutri, a rocky crescent about 3 miles long with thick areas of Mediterranean vegetation... The majestic complex marks Giannutri's most glorious time. Today the southernmost island of the Tuscan archipelago is almost empty -- populated by a huge colony of seagulls and, in summer, by a group of...
  • Villa Owned by Ben-Hur's Rival Identified

    02/19/2015 1:12:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Friday, February 13, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Archaeologists investigating the Tuscan island of Elba have identified the remains of the villa belonging to the real-life individual that inspired one of the principal characters in the epic tale of Ben-Hur. Overlooking Portoferraio's bay, the once magnificent 1st-century B.C. villa has long been believed to have been owned by Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus, portrayed as Ben-Hur in the Hollywood blockbuster starring Charlton Heston. Now in ruins, the property was known as Villa Le Grotte (the Caves) because of the shape of its vaulted facades facing the sea. While Ben-Hur was a fictional villain dreamed up in Lew Wallace's 1880...
  • Otzi’s Neandertal ancestry

    05/18/2013 3:27:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Science News ^ | May 18, 2013; Vol.183 #10; Web edition: April 15, 2013 | Bruce Bower
    A 5,300-year-old man found sticking out of an Alpine glacier in 1991 possessed more genes in common with Neandertals than Europeans today do. The man’s Neandertal heritage is a preliminary sign that Stone Age interbreeding occurred more frequently than many scientists assume. Two researchers determined that the previously analyzed genome of Ötzi the Tyrolean Iceman (SN: 3/24/12, p. 5) included roughly 4 to 4.5 percent Neandertal genes. Modern Europeans’ genetic library includes an average of 2.5 percent Neandertal genes. Human groups that migrated into Europe after 5,000 years ago mated with continental natives and diluted traces of Neandertal genetic ancestry...
  • Modern Y-Chromosome Variation Surpasses Archaic Humans (article)

    05/07/2013 7:58:39 AM PDT · by fishtank · 25 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 5-6-2013 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Modern Y-Chromosome Variation Surpasses Archaic Humans by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * The human Y-chromosome has been a sore point among secular scientists in recent years because of its many anti-evolutionary surprises. Adding to the Darwinian grief, is yet one more shocking Y-chromosome study that more clearly illustrates the boundaries of human genetic diversity. Much controversy has brewed during the past few years over the genomic sequences of what have been termed "archaic" humans. This so-called "ancient DNA" was extracted from bone fragments of "Neandertal" and "Denisovan" specimens and then sequenced, providing draft blue prints of these respective genomes.1, 2 While...
  • Ancient Etruscans Were Immigrants From Anatolia (Turkey)

    06/17/2007 4:55:52 PM PDT · by blam · 44 replies · 1,903+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 6-17-2007 | Mary Rice
    Contact: Mary Rice mary@mrcommunication.org European Society of Human Genetics Ancient Etruscans were immigrants from Anatolia, or what is now TurkeyGeneticists find the final piece in the puzzle Nice, France: The long-running controversy about the origins of the Etruscan people appears to be very close to being settled once and for all, a geneticist will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today. Professor Alberto Piazza, from the University of Turin, Italy, will say that there is overwhelming evidence that the Etruscans, whose brilliant civilisation flourished 3000 years ago in what is now Tuscany, were settlers from...
  • Neanderthals are part of the human family

    06/03/2010 7:32:55 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 100 replies · 849+ views
    It was 15 months ago that Science carried a story about the completion of a rough draft of the Neandertal genome. Palaeogeneticist Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig was reported as saying "he can't wait to finish crunching the sequence through their computers". It has been quite a long time coming, as it is more than a decade since Paabo first demonstrated it was possible to analyse Neandertal DNA sequences. Earlier reports suggested that Neandertals were sufficiently distinct from humans for them to be classified as a separate species of Homo. The draft genome...
  • London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals...

    01/16/2005 12:47:07 PM PST · by IGBT · 372 replies · 26,595+ views
    Planet Save.com ^ | 1/14/05 | Planet Save.com
    London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals, according to a new study by British scientists. Researchers at the John Radcliffe Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford were quoted by The Times as saying the so-called "ginger gene" which gives people red hair, fair skin and freckles could be up to 100 000 years old. They claim that their discovery points to the gene having originated in Neanderthal man who lived in Europe for 200 000 years before Homo sapien settlers, the ancestors of modern man, arrived from Africa about 40 000 years ago. Rosalind Harding, the...
  • DNA Traces Roots Back To Stone Age

    03/25/2002 5:34:27 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 369+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 3-24-2002 | Paul Lashmar
    26 March 2002 01:46 GMT DNA traces roots back to Stone Age By Paul Lashmar 24 March 2002 Are you a Viking, Saxon, Pict, Celt, or descendant of an ancient African tribe? New DNA testing methods will enable us to trace our family tree right back to the Stone Age. Until recently, researching your ancestry meant hours of painstaking digging through fusty old files in public record offices or asking older relatives about their family memories. When the 1901 census was released online, demand was so great that the system crashed. The new scientific technique for tracing relatives allows individuals...
  • People from Tuscany are most similar to Neanderthals

    02/15/2015 1:54:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Abroad in the Yard ^ | February 9, 2012 | AITY
    In a series of histograms (graphs showing the distribution of genome and population data), Hawks shows that Asian and European genomes have significantly more Neanderthal DNA than African genomes. The averages for Asian and European samples are around 3% higher than the average for African samples. Whatever gave Africans some degree of similarity to Neanderthals, non-Africans seem to have received around 3% more of it. Europeans average a bit more Neanderthal DNA than Asians, showing that Europeans probably mixed with Neanderthals as they moved into Europe, adding a secondary mix of Neanderthal DNA into their genome beyond the primary mix...
  • Huge Etruscan Road Brought To Light

    06/17/2004 3:38:42 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 4,329+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 6-16-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Huge Etruscan Road Brought to Light By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News The Excavated Road June 16, 2004 — A plain in Tuscany destined to become a dump has turned out to be an archaeologist's dream, revealing the biggest Etruscan road ever found. Digging in Capannori, near Lucca, archaeologist Michelangelo Zecchini has uncovered startling evidence of an Etruscan "highway" which presumably linked Etruscan Pisa, on the Tyrrhenian coast, to the Adriatic port of Spina. Passing through Bologna, the ancient "two-sea highway" runs just a few meters away from today's modern highway which links Florence to the Tyrrhenian coast. "It all started...
  • There's a Real Sword in the Stone, & It Belonged to the RCC’s First Official Saint

    10/22/2014 9:09:45 AM PDT · by millegan · 23 replies
    ChurchPOP ^ | 2014 | ChurchPOP
    You saw the Disney movie as a kid. You may have read the book. But did you know some of it was based on real history? While the story of King Arthur, Merlin, and all the rest may not be true, there really is a centuries-old sword stuck in a stone. In the small Italian town of Chiusdino, there’s a small chapel near Saint Galgano Abbey known as Montesiepi chapel. And inside you’ll find a big slab of stone in the floor with the handle of a sword sticking out of it.
  • Fabled Etruscan Kingdom Emerging?

    04/22/2004 6:18:57 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 760+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 4-22-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Fabled Etruscan Kingdom Emerging? By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News April 21, 2004 — The fabled kingdom of the Etruscan king Lars Porsena is coming to light in the Tuscan hills near Florence, according to an Italian University professor. Known as Chamars, where the lucumo (king) Porsena reigned in the 6th century B.C., this was the leading city-state of the Etruscan civilization that dominated much of Italy before the emergence of Rome. It was from there that Porsena is said to have launched his most successful attack upon Rome in order to restore the exiled Tarquinius Superbus to the throne. Porsena...
  • Tuscan 'Excalibur' Mystery To Be Unearthed

    03/02/2004 7:24:15 PM PST · by blam · 88 replies · 1,553+ views
    Discovery ^ | 3-1-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Tuscan 'Excalibur' Mystery to be Unearthed By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News The Sword in The Stone March 1, 2004 — Archaeological digging might soon unveil the mystery surrounding a sword buried in a Gothic abbey in Tuscany, Italian researchers announced. Known as the "sword in the stone," the Tuscan "Excalibur" is said to have been plunged into a rock in 1180 by Galgano Guidotti, a medieval knight who renounced war and worldly goods to become a hermit. Built in Galgano's memory, the evocative Gothic abbey at Montesiepi, near the city of Siena, still preserves the sword in a little chapel....
  • Tuscany's Excalibur Is The Real Thing, Say Scientists

    09/24/2001 7:46:55 PM PDT · by blam · 53 replies · 2,702+ views
    The Observer ^ | 9-16-2001 | Rory Carroll
    Tuscany's Excalibur is the real thing, say scientists Rory Carroll in Rome Sunday September 16, 2001 The Observer The sword of St Galgano, said to have been plunged into a rock by a medieval Tuscan knight, has been authenticated, bolstering Italy's version of the Excalibur legend. Galgano Guidotti, a noble from Chiusdano, near Siena, allegedly split the stone with his sword in 1180 after renouncing war to become a hermit. For centuries the sword was assumed to be a fake. but research revealed last week has dated its metal to the twelfth century. Only the hilt, wooden grip and ...
  • Italian court recognizes gay marriage for first time

    04/10/2014 12:22:57 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 3 replies
    An Italian court on Wednesday recognized a gay couple as married for the first time in Italy, which does not have any form of official acknowledgement of same-sex unions. The court in Grosseto in Tuscany ordered the city council to list the couple, who had their wedding in New York in 2012, as married in a ruling that was immediately hailed by gay rights campaigners as historic. “This is an unprecedented case in our country,” Sergio Lo Giudice, a senator for the Democratic Party and a former head of the watchdog Arcigay, told reporters. …