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  • Asteroid Found with Rings! First-of-Its-Kind Discovery Stuns Astronomers

    03/26/2014 12:05:41 PM PDT · by 12th_Monkey · 51 replies
    Space.com ^ | March 26, 2014 | Nola Taylor Redd
    Scientists have made a stunning discovery in the outer realm of the solar system — an asteroid with its own set of rings that orbits the sun between Saturn and Uranus. The space rock is the first non-planetary object ever found to have its own ring system, researchers say. The pair of space rock rings encircle the asteroid Chariklo. They were most likely formed after a collision scattered debris around the asteroid, according to a new study unveiled today (March 27). The asteroid rings also suggests the presence of a still-undiscovered moon around Chariklo that's keeping them stable, researchers said....
  • Violent Past: Young sun withstood a supernova blast

    10/27/2013 6:03:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Science News ^ | May 23, 2007 | Ron Cowen
    Martin Bizzarro of the University of Copenhagen and his colleagues set out to determine the amount of iron in the early solar system. To do so, they measured nickel-60, a decay product of iron-60, in eight meteorites known to have formed at different times during the first 3 million years of the solar system. The meteorites that formed more than about a million years after the start of the solar system contain significantly more nickel-60 than do those that formed earlier, the team found. In a neighborhood of young stars, only a supernova could have produced iron-60, the parent of...
  • Surprise! Earth Passing Asteroid 1998 QE2 Has a Moon

    05/30/2013 2:51:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    UniverseToday ^ | May 30, 2013 | Nancy Atkinson on
    Late yesterday, NASA turned the 230-foot (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California towards Asteroid 1998 QE2 as it was heading towards its closest approach to Earth, and they got a big surprise: the asteroid is a binary system. 1998 QE2 itself is 1.7 miles (2.7 kilometers) in diameter, and the newly found orbiting moon is about 600 meters in diameter. The radar images were taken were taken on May 29, 2013, when the asteroid was about 3.75 million miles (6 million kilometers) from Earth. “Radar really helps to pin down the orbit of an asteroid as well as...
  • Scientists plan mission to probe Uranus

    01/11/2011 2:53:34 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 98 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 1/7/11 | Paul Sutherland
    Proposed by British scientists as a joint effort of NASA and the European Space Agency, the mission would offer the first close-up view of Uranus in 25 years.British space scientists are leading plans to send a probe to explore giant ice planet Uranus. They have put forward a detailed proposal to the European Space Agency to launch a joint mission with NASA to the distant world, 1.8 billion miles from the sun. It would give scientists their first close-up views of Uranus since NASA’s Voyager 2 flew past and captured fleeting pictures 25 years ago. The £400million mission is designed...
  • Exploding Clays Drive Geminids Sky Show?

    10/19/2010 2:41:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Tuesday, October 12, 2010 | Breaking Orbit 'blogger
    The Geminid meteor shower, which peaks each year in December... are *not* caused by debris left behind from an active comet... Until recently, the favored view of Phaethon was that it's a dead comet -- the rocky core of a "dirty snowball" that lost its ices after too many close encounters with the sun. ... In June 2009 astronomers using the STEREO sun-watching probe suddenly saw the rocky body flare to life as it neared the sun, brightening by a factor of two... So, not so dead after all. But that brings us back to figuring out what exactly Phaethon...
  • Did Earth's Twin Cores Spark Plate Tectonics?

    01/07/2009 9:20:26 AM PST · by BGHater · 40 replies · 1,059+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 06 Jan 2009 | Michael Reilly
    It's a classic image from every youngster's science textbook: a cutaway image of Earth's interior. The brown crust is paper-thin; the warm mantle orange, the seething liquid of the outer core yellow, and at the center the core, a ball of solid, red-hot iron. Now a new theory aims to rewrite it all by proposing the seemingly impossible: Earth has not one but two inner cores. The idea stems from an ancient, cataclysmic collision that scientists believe occurred when a Mars-sized object hit Earth about 4.45 billion years ago. The young Earth was still so hot that it was mostly...
  • Moon Has Iron Core, Lunar-Rock Study Says

    12/06/2008 8:51:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 2,063+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | January 11, 2007 | Brian Handwerk
    Deep down, the moon may be more like Earth than scientists ever thought. A new moon-rock study suggests the satellite has an iron core... The moon's core could be a clue to its ancient origins, which have long puzzled astronomers. "Our moon is too big to be a moon," Taylor said. "It's huge compared to the moons we see around other planets, so it has always been suspected that there was something strange in its origin." ...Rock samples from NASA's Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 moon missions of the early 1970s have now shed more light on the moon's origins,...
  • Gravity Emerges from Quantum Information, Say Physicists

    03/27/2010 11:06:22 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 70 replies · 1,508+ views
    The new role that quantum information plays in gravity sets the scene for a dramatic unification of ideas in physics One of the hottest new ideas in physics is that gravity is an emergent phenomena; that it somehow arises from the complex interaction of simpler things. A few month's ago, Erik Verlinde at the the University of Amsterdam put forward one such idea which has taken the world of physics by storm. Verlinde suggested that gravity is merely a manifestation of entropy in the Universe. His idea is based on the second law of thermodynamics, that entropy always increases over...
  • The Moon may have formed in a nuclear explosion

    01/30/2010 12:03:32 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 30 replies · 787+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | 1/28/10 | Lin Edwards
    (PhysOrg.com) -- A new theory suggests the Moon was formed after a natural nuclear explosion in the Earth's mantle rather than after the impact of a massive object with the Earth, as previously thought. The problem with the impact hypothesis is that simulations calculate the Moon should be composed of 80% impactor and 20% Earth, whereas in fact the isotope ratios of light and heavy elements found in Moon rocks so far examined are virtually identical to those on Earth. The fission hypothesis is an alternative explanation for the formation of the moon, and it predicts similar isotope ratios in...
  • First speed of gravity measurement revealed

    01/07/2003 6:23:34 PM PST · by forsnax5 · 297 replies · 2,123+ views
    NewScientist.com ^ | 01/07/2003 | Ed Fomalont and Sergei Kopeikin
    The speed of gravity has been measured for the first time. The landmark experiment shows that it travels at the speed of light, meaning that Einstein's general theory of relativity has passed another test with flying colours. Ed Fomalont of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Sergei Kopeikin of the University of Missouri in Columbia made the measurement, with the help of the planet Jupiter. "We became the first two people to know the speed of gravity, one of the fundamental constants of nature," the scientists say, in an article in New Scientist print edition. One important...
  • Comets may be spawned when mum breaks up [circling the wagons cont'd]

    07/27/2008 9:57:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 159+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Saturday, July 26, 2008 | David Shiga
    Are comets born in great swarms? The puzzling abundance of comets in short solar orbits has led a pair of astronomers to suggest that they are fragments of larger bodies that crumbled as they entered the inner solar system. Short-period comets take less than 200 years to circle the sun and are thought to originate in the Kuiper belt of icy objects beyond Neptune. Some Kuiper-belt objects (KBOs) are in vulnerable orbits that allow the gravity of the outer planets to tug them inwards, where the sun's heat turns them into comets. However, there seem to be too few KBOs...
  • Right Again, Einstein

    07/05/2008 5:49:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 32 replies · 500+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 3 July 2008 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageIt's relative. Astronomers have been measuring spin precession in an eclipsing pair of pulsars.Credit: Daniel Cantin/McGill University As if his reputation needed cementing, astronomers have confirmed Albert Einstein's status as a supergenius once more. Studying a unique pair of pulsars--small and extremely dense leftovers from supernova explosions--researchers have measured an effect that was predicted by Einstein's 92-year-old general theory of relativity. The result, they report tomorrow in Science, is almost exactly what the famous physicist had foreseen. In Einstein's relativistic universe, matter curves space and slows down time, and the speed of light remains the only constant. But...
  • Rethinking Jupiter

    11/12/2007 9:59:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 94+ views
    Astrobio.net ^ | Monday, November 12, 2007 | Lee Pullen
    Without Jupiter acting as a "cosmic vacuum cleaner" sucking up these dangerous objects, there would be so many catastrophic impacts that life probably wouldn't have evolved on the Earth and we wouldn't be here today... "This vacuum cleaner idea goes back to when the long-period comets coming in from the Oort Cloud were viewed as being the only significant impact risk," says Horner. "In the 1950s there were only one or two near-Earth asteroids known, so they were viewed as oddities." ...Since the 1950s, scientists have discovered more objects in the solar system, and they say many of them could...
  • Did an ancient impact bowl Pluto over?

    10/30/2007 7:29:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 123+ views
    New Scientist ^ | October 5, 2007 | Maggie McKee
    Pluto and its large moon Charon may have been bowled over when they were struck by wayward space rocks in the past, a new study suggests. If so, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft may find evidence of these rolls when it arrives at the distant worlds in 2015. Jay Melosh of the University of Arizona in Tucson, US, first suggested about 30 years ago that the basins gouged out by impacts would redistribute the mass of planetary bodies, causing them to roll over to re-stabilise themselves... Now, Francis Nimmo of the University of California in Santa Cruz, US, who led the...
  • Mystery of Saturn's Two-Faced Moon Solved

    10/09/2007 12:31:36 PM PDT · by martin_fierro · 11 replies · 329+ views
    space.com via Yahoo news ^ | Tue Oct 9, 8:45 AM ET | Jeanna Bryner
    Mystery of Saturn's Two-Faced Moon Solved Jeanna Bryner Staff Writer SPACE.com Tue Oct 9, 8:45 AM ET Saturn's moon Iapetus has virtually no gray. Rather, its features are all stark black and white. The appearance has long puzzled astronomers. New detailed images suggest sunlight is melting ice on one side of Iapetus, leaving the moon's dark surface exposed, while the opposite half retains its reflective ice-mixed shell. Since the moon's discovery by Giovanni Domenico Cassini in 1671, Iapetus' appearance has baffled astronomers. The leading edge of Iapetus, which faces the direction of its orbit, is black as asphalt, while its...
  • Jupiter Increases Risk Of Comet Strike On Earth

    08/24/2007 1:21:38 PM PDT · by blam · 84 replies · 1,235+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 8-24-2007 | David Shiga
    Jupiter increases risk of comet strike on Earth 11:53 24 August 2007 NewScientist.com news service David Shiga Earth experienced an especially heavy bombardment of asteroids and comets early in the solar system's history (Illustration: Julian Baum) Contrary to prevailing wisdom, Jupiter does not protect Earth from comet strikes. In fact, Earth would suffer fewer impacts without the influence of Jupiter's gravity, a new study says. It could have implications for determining which solar systems are most hospitable to life. A 1994 study showed that replacing Jupiter with a much smaller planet like Uranus or Neptune would lead to 1000 times...
  • An Unknown Planet Orbits in the Outer Solar System

    08/05/2007 6:22:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies · 1,200+ views
    A theory is hereby proposed that an unknown mega-massive planet has, for billions of years, been orbiting at 77.2 AU from the sun -- within a 44 AU-wide, virtually empty Great Void that surrounds the Kuiper Belt (One AU = 93 million miles, the mean Earth-Sun distance). The Void is postulated to have been formed by strong gravitational attraction of the unknown planet having removed all CKBOs (Classical Kuiper Belt Objects) that had existed previously in the vicinity of the massive planet's huge orbit... The 77.2 AU distance from the sun of the proposed unknown planet is derived from a...
  • On The Road To Roswell 2007: A Discussion With Dr. Tom Van Flandern

    06/07/2007 9:21:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 350+ views
    American Chronicle ^ | Thursday, June 7, 2007 | interviewed by Thomas Horn
    HORN: What are some examples of genuine predictions made by the exploded planet hypothesis, or EPH? VAN FLANDERN: Here is a list of ten major predictions that have now been validated but for which the results were unknown at the time the predictions were made: that asteroids and comets should be identical types of bodies except for asteroids losing most of their volatiles because of long-term solar heating that these asteroids and comets would have "numerous and commonplace" satellites of their own that the water in meteorites would be salt water rather than pristine water that high-resolution views of irregular...
  • U.S. duo win physics Nobel for backing up Big Bang

    10/03/2006 8:59:06 PM PDT · by FFIGHTER · 19 replies · 731+ views
    Reuters ^ | Tuesday October 3, 2006 | Patrick Lannin and Sarah Edmonds
    By Patrick Lannin and Sarah Edmonds STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Americans John Mather and George Smoot won the 2006 Nobel prize for physics on Tuesday for work on cosmic radiation which helped pinpoint the age of the universe and supported the Big Bang theory of its birth. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which awarded the 10 million Swedish crown ($1.37 million) prize, said the two men were instrumental to the success of the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite program launched by NASA in 1989. Their work took Big Bang theory, which contends the universe began 15 billion years ago as...
  • Big Bang's afterglow fails intergalactic 'shadow' test

    09/01/2006 8:10:03 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 191 replies · 2,883+ views
    University of Alabama in Huntsville ^ | 01 September 2006 | Staff (press release)
    The apparent absence of shadows where shadows were expected to be is raising new questions about the faint glow of microwave radiation once hailed as proof that the universe was created by a "Big Bang." In a finding sure to cause controversy, scientists at UAH found a lack of evidence of shadows from "nearby" clusters of galaxies using new, highly accurate measurements of the cosmic microwave background. A team of UAH scientists led by Dr. Richard Lieu, a professor of physics, used data from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) to scan the cosmic microwave background for shadows caused by...
  • Berkeley Lab Physicist Challenges Speed of Gravity Claim

    06/23/2003 9:25:12 AM PDT · by RightWhale · 307 replies · 1,225+ views
    spacedaily.com ^ | 23 Jun 03 | staff
    Berkeley Lab Physicist Challenges Speed of Gravity Claim Berkeley - Jun 22, 2003 Albert Einstein may have been right that gravity travels at the same speed as light but, contrary to a claim made earlier this year, the theory has not yet been proven. A scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) says the announcement by two scientists, widely reported this past January, about the speed of gravity was wrong. Stuart Samuel, a participating scientist with the Theory Group of Berkeley Lab's Physics Division, in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, has demonstrated that an "ill-advised" assumption made...
  • Gravity waves analysis opens 'completely new sense'

    10/29/2002 10:42:41 AM PST · by RightWhale · 131 replies · 1,248+ views
    spaceref.com ^ | 29 Oct 02 | Washington Univ
    Gravity waves analysis opens 'completely new sense' PRESS RELEASE Washington University in St. Louis St. Louis, MO. -- Sometime within the next two years, researchers will detect the first signals of gravity waves -- those weak blips from the far edges of the universe passing through our bodies every second. Predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity, gravity waves are expected to reveal, ultimately, previously unattainable mysteries of the universe. Wai-Mo Suen, Ph.D., professor of physics at Washington University in St. Louis is collaborating with researchers nationwide to develop waveform templates to comprehend the signals to be analyzed. In...
  • We're going on a planet hunt

    04/05/2006 7:53:38 PM PDT · by KevinDavis · 38 replies · 814+ views
    EurekAlert ^ | 04/05/06 | Claire Bowles
    A FIFTH terrestrial planet may once have orbited between Mars and Jupiter. Although gravitational disturbances would have sent the planet hurtling into the sun or out into space long ago, traces of this long-gone world may still be visible in part of the asteroid belt today. Recent simulations have suggested that the gas giants of our solar system formed with circular orbits but moved into their more elongated paths about 4 billion years ago – 700 million years after the solar system formed. While the gas giants were in circular orbits, rocky planets should have formed in stable orbits out...
  • Barsoom, the Face, Structures on Mars

    05/16/2006 9:00:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies · 4,439+ views
    Our Tiny Little Minds | Past, Present, Future | various
    Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter ... and"The Lost Cities of Barsoom" .... by Richard C. Hoaglandupdated 4/7/06The Enterprise MissionAnother close-up from the same MRO mosaic (rotated 50 degrees, clockwise -- below) demonstrates that not all "quasi-circular features" on Mars are simple "impact craters." This remarkably preserved example exhibits organized, interior geometric detail characteristic of a massive, designed building ... surrounded by six, geometrically aligned, surviving elevated "walls" -- minus a possible roof! The massive former structure is attended by an array of additional, still partially-buried rectilinear features just outside. NOT A PING LIST, merely posted to:
  • Giant Planets 'Formed In Hundreds Of Years'

    11/28/2002 4:41:17 PM PST · by blam · 32 replies · 483+ views
    Ananova ^ | 11-28-2002
    Giant planets 'formed in hundreds of years' Giant planets like Jupiter were formed in just a few hundred years, not several million as was previously thought, according to scientists. The research completely contradicts the widely held assumption that it takes at least one million years for gas giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn to evolve. Two years of work by scientists using a greatly refined mathematical model produced results that they say explain just how quickly such planets form. Astrophysicist Thomas Quinn, from the University of Washington, said the disk of matter which spins round a young star begins to...
  • Fast-Spinning Star on Verge of Breaking Apart

    09/25/2006 7:10:05 PM PDT · by KevinDavis · 20 replies · 445+ views
    space.com ^ | 09/25/06 | Jeanna Bryner
    If your idea of fun is whirling around on a dizzying carnival ride, astronomers have found a stellar adventure that would stop you in your tracks. A sizzling-hot star is spinning around at near break-up velocity, according to a new study.
  • Red Planet's Ancient Equator Located

    04/24/2005 8:18:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies · 2,163+ views
    Scientific American (online) ^ | April 20, 2005 | Sarah Graham
    Jafar Arkani-Hamed of McGill University discovered that five impact basins--dubbed Argyre, Hellas, Isidis, Thaumasia and Utopia--form an arclike pattern on the Martian surface. Three of the basins are well-preserved and remain visible today. The locations of the other two, in contrast, were inferred from measurements of anomalies in the planet's gravitational field... a single source--most likely an asteroid that was initially circling the sun in the same plane as Mars--created all five craters. At one point the asteroid passed close to the Red Planet... and was broken apart by the force of the planet's gravity. The resulting five pieces subsequently...
  • Probe To 'Look Inside' Asteroids

    07/28/2004 8:22:08 AM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 956+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-28-2004 | Paul Rincon
    Probe to 'look inside' asteroids By Paul Rincon BBC News Online science staff in Paris, France Studies of asteroids would aid Earth-protection strategies A new space mission concept unveiled at a Paris conference aims to look inside asteroids to reveal how they are made. Deep Interior would use radar to probe the origin and evolution of two near-Earth objects less than 1km across. The mission, which could launch some time later this decade, would also give clues to how the planets evolved. The perceived threat of asteroids colliding with our planet has renewed interest in space missions to understand these...
  • Planet-Forming Disks Might Put the Brakes on Stars

    07/30/2006 10:04:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 256+ views
    NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory ^ | July 24, 2006 | Whitney Clavin
    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence that dusty disks of planet-forming material tug on and slow down the young, whirling stars they surround. Young stars are full of energy, spinning around like tops in half a day or less. They would spin even faster, but something puts on the brakes. While scientists had theorized that planet-forming disks might be at least part of the answer, demonstrating this had been hard to do until now... Stars begin life as collapsing balls of gas that spin faster and faster as they shrink, like twirling ice skaters pulling in their...
  • Astronomers poised to apply novel way to look for comets beyond Neptune

    11/07/2005 10:41:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 469+ views
    EurekAlert ^ | 7-Jan-2003 | Anne Stark
    Rather than look for the light reflected directly by these objects (as is customary astronomy practice), this project will search for those very rare moments when one of these objects passes between the telescopes and a nearby background star. This brief "eclipse" lasts less than a second, but will allow the scientists to study objects that are much too faint to be seen in reflected sunlight, even with the largest telescopes.
  • Long-Destroyed Fifth Planet May Have Caused Lunar Cataclysm, Researchers Say

    03/25/2002 2:42:10 PM PST · by vannrox · 154 replies · 4,757+ views
    SPACE dot COM ^ | 18 March 2002 ,posted: 03:00 pm ET | By Leonard David, Senior Space Writer
    Asteroid Vesta: The 10th Planet? Discovery Brightens Odds of Finding Another Pluto Nemesis: The Million Dollar Question HOUSTON, TEXAS -- Our solar system may have had a fifth terrestrial planet, one that was swallowed up by the Sun. But before it was destroyed, the now missing-in-action world made a mess of things. Space scientists John Chambers and Jack Lissauer of NASA's Ames Research Center hypothesize that along with Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars -- the terrestrial, rocky planets -- there was a fifth terrestrial world, likely just outside of Mars's orbit and before the inner asteroid belt. Moreover, Planet V...
  • New Theory: Catastrophe Created Mars' Moons

    07/29/2003 8:56:47 AM PDT · by RightWhale · 62 replies · 1,837+ views
    space.com ^ | 29 Jul 03 | Leonard David
    New Theory: Catastrophe Created Mars' Moons By Leonard David Senior Space Writer posted: 07:00 am ET 29 July 2003 PASADENA, California – The two moons of Mars – Phobos and Deimos – could be the byproducts of a breakup of a huge moon that once circled the red planet, according to a new theory. The capture of a large Martian satellite may have taken place during or shortly after the formation of the planet, with Phobos and Deimos now the surviving remnants. Origin of the two moons presents a longstanding puzzle to which one researcher proposed the new solution at...
  • Gravitational anomalies: An invisible hand?

    08/21/2004 1:31:57 AM PDT · by ScuzzyTerminator · 51 replies · 2,561+ views
    Gravitational anomalies An invisible hand?An unexplained effect during solar eclipses casts doubt on General Relativity “ASSUME nothing” is a good motto in science. Even the humble pendulum may spring a surprise on you. In 1954 Maurice Allais, a French economist who would go on to win, in 1988, the Nobel prize in his subject, decided to observe and record the movements of a pendulum over a period of 30 days. Coincidentally, one of his observations took place during a solar eclipse. When the moon passed in front of the sun, the pendulum unexpectedly started moving a bit faster than...
  • Mystery Object Encountered By Russian Phobos Spacecraft

    03/25/2005 9:18:52 PM PST · by vannrox · 88 replies · 5,506+ views
    Final Frontiers ^ | FR Post 3-24-05 | Tom Van Flandern
    Mystery Object Encountered By Russian Phobos Spacecraft by Tom Van Flandern, Astronomer Meta Research Martian moon Phobos and "Phobos Mystery Object", photographed in 1989 by a Russian spacecraft not long before all contact was lost. March 15, 1992 was the cover date on the first issue of a new astronomy research publication, the Meta Research Bulletin (MRB). Its purpose was to draw attention to deserving astronomy findings and ideas ignored solely because they did not fit well into mainstream models of the field. Such mainstream models include the Big Bang, the primeval Destination: Space nebula, the Oort cloud, and the...
  • Deep Impact ... Deepening Contradictions (Richard Hoagland dons his tinfoil hat once again)

    07/13/2005 12:29:57 PM PDT · by Yo-Yo · 12 replies · 1,425+ views
    Enterprise Mission's Captian's Blog ^ | 13 July 2005 | Richard Hoagland
    Deep Impact ... Deepening Contradictions Well, it's been over a full week now -- more than seven days -- since NASA's Deep Impact Spacecraft slammed into Comet Tempel 1-- And apparently kicked up a major firestorm ... on Earth. "Something's" definitely been happening, since the highly-publicized culmination of "Deep Impact" the other night, but NOT in public. Something that's potentially far more revealing than "just another successful NASA mission": A behind-the-scenes-eruption -- currently taking place in Washington and in Pasadena -- over precisely what Deep Impact actually ran into the other night .... How do we know that such "an...
  • RETHINKING RELATIVITY

    11/20/2003 10:35:49 AM PST · by Hermann the Cherusker · 13 replies · 509+ views
    The American Spectator | April 1999 | TOM BETHEL
    RETHINKING RELATIVITY BY TOM BETHEL No one has paid attention yet, but a well-respected physics journal just published an article whose conclusion, if generally accepted, will undermine the foundations of modern physics -- Einstein's Theory of Relativity in particular. Published in Physics Letters A (December 21, 1998), the article claims that the speed with which the force of gravity propagates must be at least twenty billion times faster than the speed of light. This would contradict the Special Theory of Relativity of 1905, which asserts that nothing can go faster than light. This claim about the special status of the...
  • Books, Magazines, Movies, Music

    07/11/2004 9:34:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 189 replies · 14,979+ views
    Amazon ^ | March 2004 | Anatoly T. Fomenko
    History: Fiction or Science? by Anatoly T. Fomenko
  • Neptune Might Have Captured Triton

    05/10/2006 12:31:09 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 19 replies · 1,120+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 5/10/06 | Sara Goudarzi
    Neptune's largest moon, Triton, was originally a member of a duo orbiting the Sun but was kidnapped during a close encounter with Neptune, a new model suggests. Triton is unique among large moons in that it orbits Neptune in a direction opposite to the planet's rotation, which long ago led scientists to speculate that the moon originally orbited the Sun. But until now, no convincing theory for how Triton paired with Neptune existed. Gravity might have pulled Triton away from its companion to make it an orbiting satellite of Neptune, researchers report in a new study published in the May...