Keyword: valleyofthekings

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  • Experts Doubt Claims of 'Hidden Chambers' in King Tut's Tomb

    03/30/2016 11:51:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 29, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    Radar experts are casting doubt on claims that King Tutankhamun's tomb contains hidden, undiscovered chambers — and they're calling for more data to be released. At a March 17 newsconference, officials at Egypt's antiquities ministry released radar data that they said showed the presence of hidden cavities inside the tomb of King Tut. The scans, carried out by Japanese radar technologist Hirokatsu Watanabe, "suggest the presence of two empty spaces or cavities beyond the decorated North and West walls of the burial chamber," they said in a statement. The scans also suggest the "presence of metallic and organic substances," and...
  • Scientists Say Egypt is in Denial Over Hidden Rooms in King Tut's Tomb

    05/15/2016 5:22:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | May 12, 2016 | Erik Shilling
    Scientists said earlier this year that they had found some secret rooms in Tutankhamen's tomb. What could they contain? A popular theory was the tomb of Queen Nefertiti. But other scientists later said that there was good reason to doubt the claims, which were based on scans. Now, the situation has gotten a little bit uglier. A team of radar technicians performed a second, more detailed set of scans on the tomb earlier this year, and sent their results off to Egypt's ministry of antiquities. But the government now has refused to release their findings, and scientists are beginning to...
  • King Tutankhamun's tomb: Evidence grows for hidden chamber

    11/28/2015 11:10:54 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    Archaeologist Nicholas Reeves believes Tutankhamun's remains may have been rushed into an outer chamber of what was originally Queen Nefertiti's tomb. The remains of Tutankhamun, who may have been her son, were found in 1922. He died 3,000 years ago aged 19. ... Dr Reeves developed his theory after the Spanish artistic and preservation specialists, Factum Arte, were commissioned to produce detailed scans of Tutankhamun's tomb. The scans were then used to produce a facsimile of the 3,300-year-old tomb near the site of the original Valley of the Kings in Luxor. While assessing the scans last February, Dr Reeves spotted...
  • Paid sick days and physicians at work: Ancient Egyptians had state-supported health care

    02/22/2015 9:14:50 AM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-16-2015 | by Anne Austin, The Conversation
    We might think of state supported health care as an innovation of the 20th century, but it's a much older tradition than that. In fact, texts from a village dating back to Egypt's New Kingdom period, about 3,100-3,600 years ago, suggest that in ancient Egypt there was a state-supported health care network designed to ensure that workers making the king's tomb were productive. Paintings on the walls of King Merneptah’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings. Workers living in Deir el-Medina would have worked on tombs like this. Credit: Asmaa Waguih/Reuters Health care boosted productivity on the royal tombs...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Egypt unveils pharaonic 'brain drain' bed

    03/25/2009 6:38:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 681+ views
    Philipines Inquirer ^ | March 19, 2009 | Agence France-Presse
    Egyptian antiquities authorities on Thursday revealed an ancient pharaonic embalming bed unearthed from a mysterious tomb near Luxor used to prepare bodies for mummification more than 3,000 years ago. The wooden bed was painstakingly restored after being discovered in pieces in the KV-63 tomb in southern Egypt's famous Valley of the Kings, next to Tutankhamun's tomb, the Supreme Council of Antiquities said in a statement. The bed, featuring carved heads of a lion and a lioness at its foot, slopes downwards five centimeters (two inches) from head to toe to help drain bodies being prepared for mummification... Antiquities supremo Zahi...
  • Mummy dearest: riddle wrapped in a mystery [Nefertiti, Maya, Ankhesenpamon?] [ KV-63 ]

    06/07/2006 9:31:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 1,113+ views
    Washington Times / AFP ^ | June 7, 2006 | Alain Navarro
    Could the small tomb, designated KV63, hold a royal mummy, perhaps that of Tutankhamen's widow or even his mother? ...Otto Schaden, the man who found them, leads the American team. He believes they may have located the mummy of Tutankhamen's widow, Ankhesenamen, after traces of her name were found on the seal of one urn. The secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, Zahi Hawass, thinks the final coffins may contain the remains of the pharaoh's mother, whose identity is unknown, and not the wife of Tutankhamen, the boy king who died at age 18.
  • Mystery tomb could hold Tutankhamen's widow

    06/02/2006 4:46:30 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 55 replies · 2,132+ views
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | 6/2/06 | The Daily Telegraph
    LONDON: It has been 84 years since Egypt's famed Valley of the Kings revealed its last great riches – the fabulous gold of Tutankhamen's tomb. Now archaeologists believe they have stumbled across one final secret: The mummified remains of the boy king's widow buried 3000 years ago. In a mysterious shaft less than 15m from Tutankhamen's burial ground, US archaeologists found seven coffins. They believe one they have not yet been able to open may contain the remains of Queen Ankhesenpaaten. The tomb – found by accident by Memphis University team leader Dr Otto Schaden – contained seven coffins stacked...
  • Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

    01/16/2012 11:38:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 1+ views
    PHYSorg ^ | January 16, 2012 | AFP
    Swiss archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a female singer dating back almost 3,000 years in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said on Sunday. The rare find was made accidentally by a team from Switzerland's Basel University headed by Elena Pauline-Grothe and Susanne Bickel in Karnak, near Luxor in Upper Egypt, the minister told the media in Cairo. The woman, Nehmes Bastet, was a singer for the supreme deity Amon Ra during the Twenty-Second Dynasty (945-712 BC), according to an inscription on a wooden plaque found in the tomb. She was the daughter of the High...
  • Discovery of a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings, KV 64

    01/20/2012 5:28:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 1+ views
    University of Basel Kings' Valley Project ^ | January 16, 2012 | Dr. Susanne Bickel
    During the season of 2011, three edges of an unknown manmade feature appeared at 1.80m to the north of KV 40, on the 25th of January, the first day of the Egyptian revolution. Due to the situation, it was immediately covered with an iron door. As this structure is so close to KV 40 and as it was impossible to know whether it was just a short unfinished shaft or a real tomb, we gave it the temporary number 40b. This number is now replaced by the final designation KV 64. The KV numbers should definitely be used exclusively for...
  • Theban Mapping Project (Valley of the Kings etc)

    01/13/2005 8:03:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies · 2,248+ views
    Theban Mapping Project ^ | 1980s to present | Kent Weeks et al
    The original page used client side image maps, and that was pretty, but a little search and replace turned it into a usable (I hope) table of links. Enjoy. FR Lexicon·Posting Guidelines·Excerpt, or Link only?·Ultimate Sidebar Management·HeadlinesDonate Here By Secure Server·Eating our own -- Time to make a new start in Free RepublicPDF to HTML translation·Translation page·Wayback Machine·My Links·FreeMail MeGods, Graves, Glyphs topic·and group·Books, Magazines, Movies, Music
  • Another new tomb in the Valley of the Kings: 'KV64'

    08/04/2006 6:20:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 399+ views
    Valley of the Kings Foundation ^ | 31 July 2006 | Nicholas Reeves
    Over the summer I have given much thought to the current state of play in the Valley, to the threat of further uncontrolled excavation and to a peculiar dilemma I find myself in: for the prospect of yet more tombs is based upon rather more than mere academic hypothesis. Just as ARTP's radar survey of the central Valley first highlighted KV63 in 2000, so our project discovered clear evidence also for the existence and location of what appears to be a second new burial, 'KV64' - the tomb to which KV63 quite likely relates... Because of the intensity of interest...
  • Isisnofret [search for an unknown tomb in the Valley of the Kings]

    03/05/2009 6:40:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 281+ views
    News from the Valley of the Kings ('blog) ^ | Monday, January 26, 2009 | Kate Phizackerley
    Weeks relates that in 1902 Howard Carter found an ostracon in debris somewhere near the entrance to KV5 which mentions several tombs:From tr(t)yt [Kate: willow tree] to the general in chief 30 cubits; (and to) the tomb of the Greatest of Seers, Meryatum, 25 cubits. From Tr(t)yt (and? to?) tomb of the oils to my Greatest of Seers, 40 cubits. Downstream on the northern path where the old tomb is, 30 cubits to the general-in-chief.And on the other side:(From?) tomb of Isisnofret to the tomb of my Greatest of Seers, Meryatum, 200 cubits. From the end of the Water of...
  • Pharaoh Seti I's Tomb Bigger Than Thought

    04/17/2008 2:24:57 PM PDT · by blam · 12 replies · 239+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 4-17-2008 | Andrew Bossone
    Pharaoh Seti I's Tomb Bigger Than ThoughtAndrew Bossone in Cairo, Egypt for National Geographic NewsApril 17, 2008 Egyptian archaeologists have discovered that the tomb of the powerful pharaoh Seti I—the largest tomb in the Valley of the Kings—is bigger than originally believed. During a recent excavation, the team found that the crypt is actually 446 feet (136 meters) in length. Giovanni Battista Belzoni, who discovered the tomb in 1817, had noted the tomb at 328 feet (100 meters). "[This is] the largest tomb and this is longest tunnel that's ever found in any place in the Valley of the Kings,"...
  • ARTP Radar Survey of the Valley of the Kings

    06/16/2013 4:39:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Nicholas Reeves dot com ^ | 2 February 2012 | Hirokatsu Watanabe, Masanori Ito and Nicholas Reeves
    The Amarna Royal Tombs Project's GPR (ground-penetrating radar) survey of the Valley of the Kings, undertaken in August 2000 by Hirokatsu Watanabe, was an experimental exercise carried out with the intention that it would be tested in due course by supplementary survey and actual excavation. Since ARTP was denied the opportunity of seeing through that vital second stage, the initial results, though promising, remained unproven. We could responsibly do little beyond keep the data on file, with a view to their eventual publication as an intriguing though sadly speculative annexe to ARTP's final report. In 2005, however, this impasse was...
  • The King Herself [ the pharaoh Hatshepsut ]

    04/05/2009 7:42:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 975+ views
    National Geographic ^ | April 2009 | Chip "Brindle" Brown
    In 1903 the renowned archaeologist Howard Carter had found Hatshepsut's sarcophagus in the 20th tomb discovered in the Valley of the Kings -- KV20. The sarcophagus, one of three Hatshepsut had prepared, was empty. Scholars did not know where her mummy was or whether it had even survived the campaign to eradicate the record of her rule during the reign of her co-regent and ultimate successor, Thutmose III, when almost all the images of her as king were systematically chiseled off temples, monuments, and obelisks... Zahi Hawass, head of the Egyptian Mummy Project and secretary general of the Supreme Council...
  • "Screaming Mummy" Is Murderous Son of Ramses III?

    11/23/2008 7:21:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 870+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Friday, November 21, 2008 | Andrew Bossone
    found in 1886 and now located in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo... [c]alled both "Unknown Man E" and the "Screaming Mummy" because of his open jaw and agonized expression, the mummy has baffled researchers since it was first uncovered. Several archaeologists have proposed theories about the mummy's cause of death, saying he might have been buried alive or poisoned, or that he was a murdered Hittite prince during the reign of Tutankhamen. Archaeologists now agree, however, that mummies are commonly found with their jaws open as a result of their heads falling back after death... The theory about poison, on...
  • Quest for the tomb of Amenhotep I

    12/24/2005 4:45:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 518+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | 22 - 28 December 2005 | Zahi Hawass
    In the area Niwinski found about 250 graffiti, some representing fish, dogs and human figures that could be dated to the pre-dynastic period. Five graffiti were found from the 21st Dynasty belonging to a scribe named, Botig Amun. Earthquakes in the area had shifted the rocks and revealed eight passages behind the temple. These passages had been made by thieves searching for tombs and treasure, and we know from the Abbott papyri that thieves entered the area and reached the bedrock. They also investigated the area horizontally. Inside one of the tunnels more graffiti was discovered. Niwinski found that some...
  • Today in history: Howard Carter discovers tomb of Tutankhamen (11/04/1922)

    11/04/2006 5:09:50 AM PST · by yankeedame · 16 replies · 574+ views
    The British Egyptologist Howard Carter (employed by Lord Carnarvon) discovered Tutankhamun's tomb (since designated KV62) in The Valley of The Kings on November 4, 1922 near the entrance to the tomb of Ramses VI, thereby setting off a renewed interest in all things Egyptian in the modern world. Carter contacted his patron, and on November 26 that year both men became the first people to enter Tutankhamun's tomb in over 3000 years. After many weeks of careful excavation, on February 16, 1923 Carter opened the inner chamber and first saw the sarcophagus of Tutankhamun. Lord Carnarvon financed Carter's search...
  • Pharaoh's curse or coincidence?[King Tut]

    11/28/2006 12:29:32 PM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 28 replies · 1,433+ views
    Chicago Sun-Times ^ | 28 Nov 2006 | JIM RITTER
    Researchers studying Tut hit by huge storm, CT malfunction Scientists who recently conducted a high-tech examination of King Tut's mummy insist they don't believe in the "Curse of the Pharaohs." Still, some awfully strange things happened when the team X-rayed the boy king's body with a medical CT scanning machine. On the way to the Egyptian site, one researcher's vehicle nearly hit a child. Then a huge storm hit. The CT machine, usually reliable, wouldn't work at first. And when researchers finally began the CT scan, one scientist came down with such a violent coughing attack he had to leave....