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Keyword: valleyofthekings

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  • Paid sick days and physicians at work: Ancient Egyptians had state-supported health care

    02/22/2015 9:14:50 AM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-16-2015 | by Anne Austin, The Conversation
    We might think of state supported health care as an innovation of the 20th century, but it's a much older tradition than that. In fact, texts from a village dating back to Egypt's New Kingdom period, about 3,100-3,600 years ago, suggest that in ancient Egypt there was a state-supported health care network designed to ensure that workers making the king's tomb were productive. Paintings on the walls of King Merneptah’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings. Workers living in Deir el-Medina would have worked on tombs like this. Credit: Asmaa Waguih/Reuters Health care boosted productivity on the royal tombs...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Egypt unveils pharaonic 'brain drain' bed

    03/25/2009 6:38:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 681+ views
    Philipines Inquirer ^ | March 19, 2009 | Agence France-Presse
    Egyptian antiquities authorities on Thursday revealed an ancient pharaonic embalming bed unearthed from a mysterious tomb near Luxor used to prepare bodies for mummification more than 3,000 years ago. The wooden bed was painstakingly restored after being discovered in pieces in the KV-63 tomb in southern Egypt's famous Valley of the Kings, next to Tutankhamun's tomb, the Supreme Council of Antiquities said in a statement. The bed, featuring carved heads of a lion and a lioness at its foot, slopes downwards five centimeters (two inches) from head to toe to help drain bodies being prepared for mummification... Antiquities supremo Zahi...
  • Mummy dearest: riddle wrapped in a mystery [Nefertiti, Maya, Ankhesenpamon?] [ KV-63 ]

    06/07/2006 9:31:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 1,113+ views
    Washington Times / AFP ^ | June 7, 2006 | Alain Navarro
    Could the small tomb, designated KV63, hold a royal mummy, perhaps that of Tutankhamen's widow or even his mother? ...Otto Schaden, the man who found them, leads the American team. He believes they may have located the mummy of Tutankhamen's widow, Ankhesenamen, after traces of her name were found on the seal of one urn. The secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, Zahi Hawass, thinks the final coffins may contain the remains of the pharaoh's mother, whose identity is unknown, and not the wife of Tutankhamen, the boy king who died at age 18.
  • Mystery tomb could hold Tutankhamen's widow

    06/02/2006 4:46:30 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 55 replies · 2,132+ views
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | 6/2/06 | The Daily Telegraph
    LONDON: It has been 84 years since Egypt's famed Valley of the Kings revealed its last great riches – the fabulous gold of Tutankhamen's tomb. Now archaeologists believe they have stumbled across one final secret: The mummified remains of the boy king's widow buried 3000 years ago. In a mysterious shaft less than 15m from Tutankhamen's burial ground, US archaeologists found seven coffins. They believe one they have not yet been able to open may contain the remains of Queen Ankhesenpaaten. The tomb – found by accident by Memphis University team leader Dr Otto Schaden – contained seven coffins stacked...
  • Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

    01/16/2012 11:38:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 1+ views
    PHYSorg ^ | January 16, 2012 | AFP
    Swiss archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a female singer dating back almost 3,000 years in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said on Sunday. The rare find was made accidentally by a team from Switzerland's Basel University headed by Elena Pauline-Grothe and Susanne Bickel in Karnak, near Luxor in Upper Egypt, the minister told the media in Cairo. The woman, Nehmes Bastet, was a singer for the supreme deity Amon Ra during the Twenty-Second Dynasty (945-712 BC), according to an inscription on a wooden plaque found in the tomb. She was the daughter of the High...
  • Discovery of a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings, KV 64

    01/20/2012 5:28:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 1+ views
    University of Basel Kings' Valley Project ^ | January 16, 2012 | Dr. Susanne Bickel
    During the season of 2011, three edges of an unknown manmade feature appeared at 1.80m to the north of KV 40, on the 25th of January, the first day of the Egyptian revolution. Due to the situation, it was immediately covered with an iron door. As this structure is so close to KV 40 and as it was impossible to know whether it was just a short unfinished shaft or a real tomb, we gave it the temporary number 40b. This number is now replaced by the final designation KV 64. The KV numbers should definitely be used exclusively for...
  • Theban Mapping Project (Valley of the Kings etc)

    01/13/2005 8:03:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies · 2,248+ views
    Theban Mapping Project ^ | 1980s to present | Kent Weeks et al
    The original page used client side image maps, and that was pretty, but a little search and replace turned it into a usable (I hope) table of links. Enjoy. FR Lexicon·Posting Guidelines·Excerpt, or Link only?·Ultimate Sidebar Management·HeadlinesDonate Here By Secure Server·Eating our own -- Time to make a new start in Free RepublicPDF to HTML translation·Translation page·Wayback Machine·My Links·FreeMail MeGods, Graves, Glyphs topic·and group·Books, Magazines, Movies, Music
  • Another new tomb in the Valley of the Kings: 'KV64'

    08/04/2006 6:20:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 399+ views
    Valley of the Kings Foundation ^ | 31 July 2006 | Nicholas Reeves
    Over the summer I have given much thought to the current state of play in the Valley, to the threat of further uncontrolled excavation and to a peculiar dilemma I find myself in: for the prospect of yet more tombs is based upon rather more than mere academic hypothesis. Just as ARTP's radar survey of the central Valley first highlighted KV63 in 2000, so our project discovered clear evidence also for the existence and location of what appears to be a second new burial, 'KV64' - the tomb to which KV63 quite likely relates... Because of the intensity of interest...
  • Isisnofret [search for an unknown tomb in the Valley of the Kings]

    03/05/2009 6:40:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 281+ views
    News from the Valley of the Kings ('blog) ^ | Monday, January 26, 2009 | Kate Phizackerley
    Weeks relates that in 1902 Howard Carter found an ostracon in debris somewhere near the entrance to KV5 which mentions several tombs:From tr(t)yt [Kate: willow tree] to the general in chief 30 cubits; (and to) the tomb of the Greatest of Seers, Meryatum, 25 cubits. From Tr(t)yt (and? to?) tomb of the oils to my Greatest of Seers, 40 cubits. Downstream on the northern path where the old tomb is, 30 cubits to the general-in-chief.And on the other side:(From?) tomb of Isisnofret to the tomb of my Greatest of Seers, Meryatum, 200 cubits. From the end of the Water of...
  • Pharaoh Seti I's Tomb Bigger Than Thought

    04/17/2008 2:24:57 PM PDT · by blam · 12 replies · 239+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 4-17-2008 | Andrew Bossone
    Pharaoh Seti I's Tomb Bigger Than ThoughtAndrew Bossone in Cairo, Egypt for National Geographic NewsApril 17, 2008 Egyptian archaeologists have discovered that the tomb of the powerful pharaoh Seti I—the largest tomb in the Valley of the Kings—is bigger than originally believed. During a recent excavation, the team found that the crypt is actually 446 feet (136 meters) in length. Giovanni Battista Belzoni, who discovered the tomb in 1817, had noted the tomb at 328 feet (100 meters). "[This is] the largest tomb and this is longest tunnel that's ever found in any place in the Valley of the Kings,"...
  • ARTP Radar Survey of the Valley of the Kings

    06/16/2013 4:39:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Nicholas Reeves dot com ^ | 2 February 2012 | Hirokatsu Watanabe, Masanori Ito and Nicholas Reeves
    The Amarna Royal Tombs Project's GPR (ground-penetrating radar) survey of the Valley of the Kings, undertaken in August 2000 by Hirokatsu Watanabe, was an experimental exercise carried out with the intention that it would be tested in due course by supplementary survey and actual excavation. Since ARTP was denied the opportunity of seeing through that vital second stage, the initial results, though promising, remained unproven. We could responsibly do little beyond keep the data on file, with a view to their eventual publication as an intriguing though sadly speculative annexe to ARTP's final report. In 2005, however, this impasse was...
  • The King Herself [ the pharaoh Hatshepsut ]

    04/05/2009 7:42:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 975+ views
    National Geographic ^ | April 2009 | Chip "Brindle" Brown
    In 1903 the renowned archaeologist Howard Carter had found Hatshepsut's sarcophagus in the 20th tomb discovered in the Valley of the Kings -- KV20. The sarcophagus, one of three Hatshepsut had prepared, was empty. Scholars did not know where her mummy was or whether it had even survived the campaign to eradicate the record of her rule during the reign of her co-regent and ultimate successor, Thutmose III, when almost all the images of her as king were systematically chiseled off temples, monuments, and obelisks... Zahi Hawass, head of the Egyptian Mummy Project and secretary general of the Supreme Council...
  • "Screaming Mummy" Is Murderous Son of Ramses III?

    11/23/2008 7:21:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 870+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Friday, November 21, 2008 | Andrew Bossone
    found in 1886 and now located in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo... [c]alled both "Unknown Man E" and the "Screaming Mummy" because of his open jaw and agonized expression, the mummy has baffled researchers since it was first uncovered. Several archaeologists have proposed theories about the mummy's cause of death, saying he might have been buried alive or poisoned, or that he was a murdered Hittite prince during the reign of Tutankhamen. Archaeologists now agree, however, that mummies are commonly found with their jaws open as a result of their heads falling back after death... The theory about poison, on...
  • Quest for the tomb of Amenhotep I

    12/24/2005 4:45:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 518+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | 22 - 28 December 2005 | Zahi Hawass
    In the area Niwinski found about 250 graffiti, some representing fish, dogs and human figures that could be dated to the pre-dynastic period. Five graffiti were found from the 21st Dynasty belonging to a scribe named, Botig Amun. Earthquakes in the area had shifted the rocks and revealed eight passages behind the temple. These passages had been made by thieves searching for tombs and treasure, and we know from the Abbott papyri that thieves entered the area and reached the bedrock. They also investigated the area horizontally. Inside one of the tunnels more graffiti was discovered. Niwinski found that some...
  • Today in history: Howard Carter discovers tomb of Tutankhamen (11/04/1922)

    11/04/2006 5:09:50 AM PST · by yankeedame · 16 replies · 574+ views
    The British Egyptologist Howard Carter (employed by Lord Carnarvon) discovered Tutankhamun's tomb (since designated KV62) in The Valley of The Kings on November 4, 1922 near the entrance to the tomb of Ramses VI, thereby setting off a renewed interest in all things Egyptian in the modern world. Carter contacted his patron, and on November 26 that year both men became the first people to enter Tutankhamun's tomb in over 3000 years. After many weeks of careful excavation, on February 16, 1923 Carter opened the inner chamber and first saw the sarcophagus of Tutankhamun. Lord Carnarvon financed Carter's search...
  • Pharaoh's curse or coincidence?[King Tut]

    11/28/2006 12:29:32 PM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 28 replies · 1,433+ views
    Chicago Sun-Times ^ | 28 Nov 2006 | JIM RITTER
    Researchers studying Tut hit by huge storm, CT malfunction Scientists who recently conducted a high-tech examination of King Tut's mummy insist they don't believe in the "Curse of the Pharaohs." Still, some awfully strange things happened when the team X-rayed the boy king's body with a medical CT scanning machine. On the way to the Egyptian site, one researcher's vehicle nearly hit a child. Then a huge storm hit. The CT machine, usually reliable, wouldn't work at first. And when researchers finally began the CT scan, one scientist came down with such a violent coughing attack he had to leave....
  • King Tut’s Sister Stolen in Massive Museum Heist

    11/15/2013 9:58:11 AM PST · by smokingfrog · 40 replies
    ABC News ^ | 11-15-13 | Lana Zak
    PRETORIA, South Africa – King Tut’s sister is missing and Egypt has issued an international alert for her return. UNESCO and Interpol are working with Egyptian authorities to recover the priceless artifact, a limestone figurine of the young pharaoh’s sister from the 14th century BC. The young girl holds a piece of fruit and her hair flows loosely on one side–a symbol of her youth–but her head is held high, a decidedly regal look on her face. “This constitutes irreversible damage to the history and identity of the Egyptian people,” said Irina Bokova, the Director-General of UNESCO. The statuette, “A...
  • Tomb May Shed Light On 10th Plague

    11/23/2004 6:11:43 PM PST · by blam · 86 replies · 4,257+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | 11-23-2004 | Charles M. Sennott
    Tomb may shed light on 10th plague By Charles M. Sennott, Globe Staff | November 23, 2004 LUXOR, Egypt — Out of the blinding light of a fall morning here in the Valley of the Kings, American archeologist Kent Weeks led the way down a narrow, stone passageway and into the entrance of a tomb. Weeks peered his flashlight into the enveloping darkness of ‘‘the hidden tomb,’’ as he calls it, and pressed on through the damp, winding passages toward what may be his archeological team’s most significant find after years of methodical digging, scraping, and brushing. At the end...
  • Face of King Tut unshrouded to public

    11/04/2007 7:10:10 AM PST · by Aristotelian · 44 replies · 1,368+ views
    AP ^ | November 4, 2007 | ANNA JOHNSON
    LUXOR, Egypt - The face of King Tut was unshrouded in public for the first time on Sunday — 85 years after the 3,000-year-old boy pharaoh's golden enshrined tomb and mummy were discovered in Luxor's famed Valley of the Kings. Archeologists removed the mummy from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb, momentarily pulling aside a white linen covering to reveal a shriveled leathery black face and body. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and...
  • Mummy of Egyptian queen Hatshepsut may have been found (in a humble tomb in the Valley of the Kings)

    06/25/2007 8:05:18 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies · 1,521+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 6/25/07 | Jonathan Wright
    CAIRO (Reuters) - Egyptologists think they have identified with certainty the mummy of Hatshepsut, the most famous queen to rule ancient Egypt, found in a humble tomb in the Valley of the Kings, an archaeologist said on Monday. Egypt's chief archaeologist, Zahi Hawass, will hold a news conference in Cairo on Wednesday. The Discovery Channel said he would announce what it called the most important find in the Valley of the Kings since the discovery of King Tutankhamun. The archaeologist, who asked not to be named, said the candidate for identification as the mummy of Hatshepsut was one of two...
  • Tutankhamun Fetuses To Get Paternity Test

    08/07/2008 10:42:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 109+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Wednesday, August 6, 2008 | staff and Reuters
    Egyptian scientists are doing DNA tests on stillborn children found in Tutankhamun's tomb in the hope of confirming if they are the pharoah's offspring and confirming his family tree. British archaeologist Howard Carter found the mummified fetuses when he discovered the tomb in 1922. Archaeologists assume they are the children of the teenage pharaoh, but this has not been confirmed. The identity of their mother is also still unknown. Many scholars believe their mother to be Ankhesenamun, the boy king's only known wife. Ankhesenamun is the daughter of the queen Nefertiti, who was renowned for her beauty. "For the first...
  • BOOK FEATURE: The man who really found Tutankhamen (British Corporal Spy)

    03/31/2005 1:45:59 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 18 replies · 1,961+ views
    Middle East Times/World peace Times ^ | March 31, 2005 | Desmond Zwar
    CAIRO, Egypt -- For the past 36 years journalist and author Desmond Zwar has shared a great secret: that it was not archaeologist Howard Carter who was responsible for the discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb, but a humble British corporal whose very presence on the site had to be kept confidential; who in the last days of the dig took a photograph that changed history. Richard Adamson was a 23-year-old spy. He had infiltrated the Wafdist Party -- dedicated to overthrowing British rule in Egypt -- and as a result 28 Egyptians were arrested in Cairo, four of them sentenced to...
  • King Tut's Mummified Erect Penis May Point to Ancient Religious Struggle

    01/06/2014 6:58:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 97 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 02, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The pharaoh was buried in Egypt's Valley of the Kings without a heart (or a replacement artifact known as a heart scarab); his penis was mummified erect; and his mummy and coffins were covered in a thick layer of black liquid that appear to have resulted in the boy-king catching fire... The mummified erect penis and other burial anomalies were not accidents during embalming, Ikram suggests, but rather deliberate attempts to make the king appear as Osiris, the god of the underworld, in as literal a way as possible. The erect penis evokes Osiris' regenerative powers; the black liquid made...
  • Manchester University Helps With Pharaoh Analysis (Hatshepsut)

    07/16/2007 7:19:32 PM PDT · by blam · 36 replies · 910+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 7-16-2007 | University Of Manchester
    Contact: Aeron Haworth aeron.haworth@manchester.ac.uk 44-771-788-1563 University of Manchester Manchester University helps with pharaoh DNA analysisPreliminary results support positive identification of Egyptian queen Preliminary results from DNA tests carried out on a mummy believed to be Queen Hatshepsut is expected to support the claim by Egyptian authorities that the remains are indeed those of Egypt’s most powerful female ruler. Egyptologists in Cairo announced last month that a tooth found in a wooden box associated with Hatshepsut exactly fitted the jaw socket and broken root of the unidentified mummy. Now, Dr Angelique Corthals, a biomedical Egyptologist at The University of Manchester, says...
  • Study: King Tut Wasn't Bludgeoned to Death

    12/02/2006 9:01:58 AM PST · by aculeus · 31 replies · 840+ views
    Live Science.com ^ | November 27, 2006 | By E.J. Mundell, Health Day Reporter
    Dead men don't tell tales, but dead pharaohs might. CT scans of King Tutankhamun's mummy may put the world's oldest "cold case" to rest, refuting the notion that the ruler's enemies bludgeoned him to death. Instead, a festering leg wound may have led to the boy-king's early demise at 19, more than 3,300 years ago, researchers say. The scans, the first ever performed on an identified royal Egyptian mummy, "finally lay to rest this rather loosely based conjecture about a murder plot. I don't think that anyone who reads the findings as they are written can believe that any longer,"...
  • Largest Saqqara Tomb Discovered [ 26th Dynasty ]

    01/05/2010 5:49:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1,143+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Monday, January 4, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An Egyptian team led by Dr. Zahi Hawass, chief of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, has unearthed the largest tomb yet discovered in the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, also known as the "City of the Dead." Filled with skeletons, coffins and eagle mummies, the tomb was found just near the entrance point of the archaeological site. Simply cut into limestone, the burial, which dates to the 26th Dynasty (664 -525 B.C.), extends from a large rock-hewn hall into a number of corridors and small rooms. Inside, the archaeologists found several coffins, skeletons and pots. At the tomb's northern end, the...
  • Mysterious Buried Artifacts Discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

    05/07/2014 7:06:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    LiveScience ^ | May 01, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    Four deposits of artifacts possibly buried as a ritual act of sorts before the construction of a tomb have been discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. The so-called foundation deposits, arranged in a boxlike shape, contain a mix of artifacts, including the head of a cow, a vase painted in blue and flint blades that have wooden handles that are still preserved after more than three millennia... The discovery was made in its "western valley," an area sometimes called the "valley of the monkeys" after a scene depicting 12 baboons was discovered in one of its tombs... [Afifi] Ghonim,...
  • Hatshepsut mummy found

    03/26/2006 8:43:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies · 4,775+ views
    Egyptian State News Service ^ | Friday, March 24, 2006 | unattributed
    The true mummy of ancient Egyptian queen Hatshepsut was discovered in the third floor of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Secretary General of Supreme Council for Antiquities Zahi Hawwas revealed on Thursday. The mummy was missing among thousands of artifacts lying in the museum, he said during his lecture at the New York-based Metropolitan Museum of Arts. He said for decades archaeologists believed that a mummy found in Luxor was that of the Egyptian queen. It was a streak of luck, he said, to find this mummy. The Metropolitan is hosting a Hatshepsut exhibition that displays 270 artifacts on the...
  • Surprise Finds At Egypt Temple "Change Everything"

    12/19/2007 3:43:27 AM PST · by blam · 43 replies · 3,172+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 12-17-2007 | Steven Stanek
    Surprise Finds at Egypt Temple "Change Everything" Steven Stanek in Luxor, Egypt for National Geographic NewsDecember 17, 2007 A series of surprising discoveries has been made at the foot of Egypt's famous Temple of Amun at Karnak, archaeologists say. The new finds include ancient ceremonial baths, a pharaoh's private entry ramp, and the remains of a massive wall built some 3,000 years ago to reinforce what was then the bank of the Nile River. A host of other artifacts, including hundreds of bronze coins, has also been found. Together the discoveries are causing experts to reconsider the history of the...
  • Mummy-fried! Tutankhamun's body spontaneously combusted INSIDE his coffin

    11/03/2013 9:31:59 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 62 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 11-3-13 | Claudia Joseeph & Sam Webb
    The mummified body of Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun burst into flames inside his sarcophagus after a botched attempt to embalm him, according to scientists in a new documentary. After his death in 1323 BC, Tutankhamun was rapidly embalmed and buried, but fire investigators believe a chemical reaction caused by embalming oils used on his mummy sparked the blaze. A fragment of flesh from the boy pharaoh, whose tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter and the Earl of Carnarvon, was tested by researchers who confirmed his body was burnt while sealed in his coffin. Tut has long fired the public imagination....
  • Egyptian Mummies Yield Earliest Evidence of Malaria

    10/28/2008 8:03:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 231+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Two Egyptian mummies who died more than 3,500 years ago have provided clear evidence for the earliest known cases of malaria, according to a study presented this week in Naples at an international conference on ancient DNA. Pathologist Andreas Nerlich and colleagues at the Academic Teaching Hospital München-Bogenhausen in Munich, Germany, studied 91 bone tissue samples from ancient Egyptian mummies and skeletons dating from 3500 to 500 B.C. Using special techniques from molecular biology, such as DNA amplification and gene sequencing, the researchers identified ancient DNA for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in tissues from two mummies... Caused by four...
  • Human Remains In Ancient Jar A Mystery

    01/26/2007 2:38:22 PM PST · by blam · 34 replies · 1,040+ views
    Discovery.com ^ | 1-26-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Human Remains in Ancient Jar a Mystery Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Jan. 23, 2007 — For over 100 years, four blue-glazed jars bearing the nametag of Rameses II (1302-1213 B.C.) were believed to contain the Egyptian pharaoh's bodily organs. But analysis of organic residues scraped from the jars has determined one actually contained an aromatic salve, while a second jar held the organs of an entirely different person who lived around 760 years later. Now the question is, who was this individual? "We do believe that the unknown person was of importance for at least two reasons," said Jacques Connan,...
  • 'Hairdo archaeologist' solves ancient fashion mystery

    05/27/2013 4:03:43 PM PDT · by thecodont · 19 replies
    BBC via Drudge Report / www.drudgereport.com ^ | 26 May 2013 Last updated at 18:51 ET | Produced by the BBC's Peter Murtaugh
    [Janet] Stephens is a hairstyle archaeologist who specialises in recreating how women in ancient Rome and Greece wore their hair. She spoke to the BBC about a museum visit that marked the start of a long journey of discovery on which she solved a historical mystery and had her work published in an academic journal.
  • Unearthing Egypt's Greatest Temple

    11/01/2007 9:33:14 AM PDT · by BGHater · 39 replies · 57+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | October 2007 | Andew Lawler
    Discovering the grandeur of the monument built 3,400 years ago "Heya hup!" Deep in a muddy pit, a dozen workers wrestle with Egypt's fearsome lion goddess, struggling to raise her into the sunlight for the first time in more than 3,000 years. She is Sekhmet—"the one who is powerful"—the embodiment of the fiery eye of the sun god Ra, but now she is caked in dirt and bound by thick rope. As the workers heave her out of the pit and onto a wooden track, the sand shifts and the six-foot-tall granite statue threatens to topple. A half-dozen men in...
  • Stanford archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at... Deir el-Medina

    11/23/2014 3:17:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Stanford Report ^ | November 17, 2014 | Barbara Wilcox
    In many bodies Austin saw evidence of stress from the hard climb – today it's a thousand stone steps – from Deir el-Medina to the Valley of the Kings and back again. As Austin found, incidence of arthritis in the knees and ankles of the men at Deir el-Medina was significantly higher than for working populations from other Egyptian cemeteries. The bones also revealed clues that corroborate other scholars' findings that severely disabled Egyptians were well cared for. "I found the remains of a man who died at the age of 19 or 20 and was born without a useful...
  • About 50 Mummies Discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

    04/29/2014 4:15:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    NBC news ^ | April 28th 2014 | Reuters
    CAIRO — Remains of about 50 mummies, including newborn babies, thought to belong to the 18th Dynasty were found in a huge tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said Monday. Wooden coffins and death masks were found beside the bodies, probably dating from the New Kingdom, state news agency MENA quoted Ibrahim as saying. The New Kingdom takes in Egypt's 18th, 19th and 20th pharaonic dynasties, dating between about 1567 and 1085 B.C. According to initial studies of the find, princes and princesses were among the bodies found in the tomb, which had...
  • Pharaonic tomb find stuns Egypt [Possibly Nefertiti ... find by American archaeologists]

    02/10/2006 3:57:33 PM PST · by aculeus · 63 replies · 1,951+ views
    BBC News on line ^ | February 10, 2006 | Unsigned
    Archaeologists have discovered an intact, ancient Egyptian tomb in the Valley of the Kings, the first since King Tutankhamun's was found in 1922. A University of Memphis-led team found the previously unknown tomb complete with sarcophagi and five mummies. The archaeologists have not yet been able to identify them. But Egypt's chief archaeologist Zahi Hawass says they "might be royals or nobles" moved from "original graves to protect them from grave robbers". "We don't really know what kind of people are inside but I do believe they look royal. Maybe they are kings or queens or nobles," he told Reuters...
  • US dig uncovers King Tut's neighbours

    02/08/2006 10:48:04 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies · 1,625+ views
    The Age ^ | February 9, 2006 - 2:26AM
    AN American archaeological mission discovered a tomb in Luxor's Valley of the Kings next to the burial place of King Tut, Egyptian antiquities authorities have announced. An excavation team from the University of Memphis made the find five metres from Tutankhamun's tomb, while the mission was doing routine excavation work, said Zahi Hawass, secretary-general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities. Some three metres beneath the ground, the tomb contained five human mummies with coloured funerary masks enclosed in sarcophagi and several large storage jars. The mummies date to the 18th dynasty (circa 1539-1292 BC).