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Keyword: vesuvius

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  • Herculaneum Panoramas

    05/10/2013 6:20:20 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 16 replies
    Herculaneum Panoramas ^ | 2001 - 2012 | Herculaneum Conservation Project
    Virtual tour of Herculaneum, documenting the site, and the work of the Herculaneum Conservation Project. Click on the node-markers to view an interactive 360-degree panorama (in a new window). The plan above shows the locations of panoramas made mainly in 2001 (a few are from 1999), where the aim was to provide an overview of the site (as it was then), along with tours of a few selected houses. The menu of houses and other areas at left accesses additional, more recent coverage (including revisits to some houses and other structures) made from 2003 onward.
  • Diets of the middle and lower class in Pompeii revealed

    01/05/2014 7:13:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 1-2-2014 | Dawn Fuller
    University of Cincinnati archaeologists are turning up discoveries in the famed Roman city of Pompeii that are wiping out the historic perceptions of how the Romans dined, with the rich enjoying delicacies such as flamingos and the poor scrounging for soup or gruel. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, will present these discoveries on Jan. 4, at the joint annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and American Philological Association (APA) in Chicago. UC teams of archaeologists have spent more than a decade at two city blocks within a non-elite district in the Roman...
  • Getty Villa Examines Life and Legacy of Roman Emperor Tiberius

    10/19/2013 4:42:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, Octoer 10, 2013 | Press Release of the J. Paul Getty Museum
    Buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, an over-life-size bronze portrait of Tiberius (ruled A.D. 14–37) was discovered in 1741, during the first years of excavation at Herculaneum. On loan from the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples, this statue is the subject of the exhibitionTiberius: Portrait of an Emperor, on view at the Getty Villa October 16, 2013 through March 3, 2014. Brought to the Getty Villa for conservation and analysis last October, the sculpture provides an opportunity to re-examine the career and character of Rome’s second emperor. The exhibition has been co-organized by the J. Paul Getty...
  • Think Pompeii Got Hit Hard? Worse Eruptions Lurk

    03/07/2006 11:10:23 AM PST · by blam · 54 replies · 1,556+ views
    Think Pompeii got hit hard? Worse eruptions lurk By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent Mon Mar 6, 5:03 PM ET WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- The preserved footprints and abandoned homes of villagers who fled a giant eruption of Mount Vesuvius 3,800 years ago show the volcano could destroy modern-day Naples with little warning, Italian and U.S. researchers reported on Monday. The eruption buried entire villages as far as 15 miles (25 kilometres) from the volcano, cooking people as they tried to escape and dumping several feet (metres) of ash and mud. New excavations show far more extensive damage than that...
  • Move Over, Pompeii

    08/10/2004 10:03:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 695+ views
    Archaeology, Volume 55 Number 2 ^ | March/April 2002 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    One of the world's best-preserved Bronze Age villages has been found at Nola, a few miles from Vesuvius, during routine tests before construction of a shopping center. A catastrophic eruption of the volcano, known to have taken place between 1800 and 1750 B.C., left this "Prehistoric Pompeii" in a state of remarkable preservation... Although much of the structure of the prehistoric huts was destroyed by the eruption, falling ash and volcanic mud hardened to create a kind of mold of the village in reverse, much like the casts of the victims of Vesuvius' more famous eruption. In addition to...
  • Mount Vesuvius [ erupted and buried Pompeii et al, August 24-25, A.D. 79 ]

    08/27/2011 7:54:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Wheeling Jesuit University ^ | January 18, 2011 | ETE Team
    Pliny the Elder's ship approached the shore near Pompeii. Ashes were already falling, hotter and thicker as the ships drew near, followed by bits of pumice and blackened stones, charred and cracked by the flames . . . Meanwhile on Mount Vesuvius broad sheets of fire and leaping flames blazed at several points, their bright glare emphasized by the darkness of night. (pp. 429, 431) But they could not land because the shore was blocked by volcanic debris, so they sailed south and landed at Stabiae. Hoping to quiet the frightened people, the uncle asked to be carried to the...
  • The World’s First Commercial Jingle?

    04/12/2011 7:33:16 AM PDT · by sussex · 13 replies
    The Aged P.com ^ | 12/04/11 | the Aged P
    John Lewis, when asked why the MJQ played God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen, said there were certain tunes (like GRYMG and When Johnny Comes Marching Home) that just make you feel good. So true. Well, here’s another – yes, I know its only Aqua with the great Luciano Pavarotti – but just watch and feel the buzz. I defy anyone to remain passive whenever this tune is played – it’s probably one of the most familiar tunes in the western world – and even if your knowledge of Italian is zilch everyone can pump out part of that chorus line…
  • Villa Buried By Pompeii Eruption Is Unearthed

    11/21/2005 6:30:58 PM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 1,427+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 11-22-2005 | Hilary Clarke
    Villa buried by Pompeii eruption is unearthed By Hilary Clarke in Rome (Filed: 22/11/2005) An archaeological dig on the Amalfi coast has revealed the first luxury villa to be built in the idyllic fishing village of Positano, a popular haunt of today's rich and famous. A frescoe on a wall of the villa found in Positano Two storeys of a first century millionaire's abode have been found under a church which was hidden for 2,000 years by the same volcanic eruption that devastated Pompeii in 79AD. During renovation work on the church's crypt last summer, roof beams were found poking...
  • The Destruction of Pompeii—God’s Revenge?

    06/24/2010 9:58:14 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 44 replies
    Biblical Archeological Review ^ | Jul/Aug 2010 | Hershel Shanks
    Nine years, almost to the day, after Roman legionaries destroyed God’s house in Jerusalem, God destroyed the luxurious watering holes of the Roman elite. Was this God’s revenge? That’s not exactly the question I want to raise, however. Rather, did anyone at the time see it that way? Did anyone connect the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. with the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70? First the dates: The Romans destroyed the Second Temple (Herod’s Temple) on the same date that the Babylonians had destroyed the First Temple (Solomon’s Temple) in 586 B.C.E. But the exact date of...
  • UQ archaeology digs into the life behind Pompeii [latrines]

    11/25/2009 9:56:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 622+ views
    University of Queensland ^ | November 25, 2009 | Dr Andy Fairbairn or Andrew Dunne
    Brisbane may be 2000 years and half-a-world away from Pompeii, but it hasn't stopped a UQ archaeologist from digging up some hidden treasures. Dr Andy Fairbairn, a senior lecturer in archaeology with UQ's School of Social Science, is working on a project looking at the life inside one of the world's most famous dig sites... He does this by collecting samples from what would have been the toilets of the day to see the types of food were eaten... He said his team of volunteer archaeology students patiently go through hundreds of bags of samples collected in Pompeii, looking for...
  • Pompeii's Burial Not Its First Disaster

    12/02/2004 4:17:13 PM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 1,275+ views
    Science News ^ | 11-27-2004 | Sid Perkins
    Pompeii's burial not its first disaster Sid Perkins From Denver, at a meeting of the Geological Society of America Recent excavations reveal that the ancient city of Pompeii, famed for its burial by an eruption of Italy's Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79, suffered through several devastating landslides in the centuries preceding its volcanic demise. About three-fourths of Pompeii has been excavated, says Jean-Daniel Stanley of the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. However, most of the digs in the city have extended down only to the ground level of dwellings that were standing in the 1st century. In...
  • UK to 'unroll' papyrus scrolls buried by Vesuvius [Kentucky prof has non-invasive scanning technique

    05/24/2009 5:28:13 AM PDT · by Mike Fieschko · 28 replies · 1,248+ views
    Lexington Herald-Leader ^ | Tuesday, May. 19, 2009 | Jim Warren
    On Aug. 24, 79 A.D., Italy's Mount Vesuvius exploded, burying the Roman towns of Herculaneum and Pompeii under tons of super-heated ash, rock and debris in one of the most famous volcanic eruptions in history. Thousands died. But somehow, hundreds of papyrus scrolls survived -- sort of -- in a villa at Herculaneum thought to have been owned at one time by Julius Caesar's father-in-law. The scrolls contained ancient philosophical and learned writings. But they were so badly damaged -- literally turned to carbon by the volcanic heat -- that they crumbled when scholars first tried to open them centuries...
  • Pompeii Family's Final Hours Reconstructed

    12/15/2008 7:31:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 1,546+ views
    Discovery News ^ | December 11, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    At around 1:00 p.m. on Aug. 24, 79 A.D., Pompeii residents saw a pine tree-shaped column of smoke bursting from Vesuvius. Reaching nine miles into the sky, the column began spewing a thick pumice rain. Many residents rushed in the streets, trying to leave the city. "At that moment, Polybius' house was inhabited by 12 people, including a young woman in advanced pregnancy. They decided to remain in the house, most likely because it was safer for the pregnant woman. Given the circumstances, it was the right strategy," Scarpati said... At around 7:00 p.m., by which time the front part...
  • In search of Western civilisation's lost classics (Herculaneum)

    08/19/2008 4:35:32 PM PDT · by decimon · 9 replies · 160+ views
    The Australian ^ | August 06, 2008 | Luke Slattery
    The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius's eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secretsSTORED in a sky-lit reading room on the top floor of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Naples are the charred remains of the only library to survive from classical antiquity. The ancient world's other great book collections -- at Athens, Alexandria and Rome -- all perished in the chaos of the centuries. But the library of the Villa of the Papyri was conserved, paradoxically, by an act of destruction. Lying to the northwest of ancient Herculaneum, this...
  • Fish Sauce Used to Date Pompeii Eruption [ garum / liquamen]

    09/30/2008 4:30:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 6,769+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Monday, September 29, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Remains of rotten fish entrails have helped establish the precise dating of Pompeii's destruction, according to Italian researchers who have analyzed the town's last batch of garum, a pungent, fish-based seasoning. Frozen in time by the catastrophic eruption that covered Pompeii and nearby towns nearly 2,000 years ago with nine to 20 feet of hot ash and pumice, the desiccated remains were found at the bottom of seven jars. The find revealed that the last Pompeian garum was made entirely with bogues (known as boops boops), a Mediterranean fish species that abounded in the area in the summer months of...
  • Italians Dig Deep to Reveal Forgotten Roman City

    04/22/2006 8:04:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 504+ views
    Ancient Worlds (Reuters, Yahoo) ^ | Sun Aug 17, 2003 | Estelle Shirbon
    for 10 years, an Italian team has been beavering away underground to reveal the wonders of Pozzuoli, once the port of ancient Rome, which is buried under a 16th century city. Excavators at Pompeii, entombed in ash and toxic debris by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, were able to remove the volcanic material and expose the city to the open air. But in Pozzuoli, whose beauty was such that the great Roman orator Cicero called it "little Rome," the ancient streets were encased in the foundations of a new city built by the Spanish in the 1500s,...
  • Beyond Pompeii: Places swallowed by Vesuvius

    09/02/2008 9:49:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 178+ views
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | Sunday, August 31, 2008 | Edward Sozanski
    Over several centuries, millions of tourists have visited Pompeii to acquaint themselves with the cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius that began on Aug. 24, 79 A.D. But while it's the most famous eruption site, the ancient Roman city 15 miles south of Naples isn't the best place to gauge the volcano's awesome destructive power. For that, one should visit lesser-known Herculaneum, which is closer to Vesuvius, or Oplontis and Stabiae, two sites more recently uncovered and still relatively unknown to tourists. In these places, several of which are still being excavated, the eruption's consequences are more visible.
  • In search of Western civilisation's lost classics

    08/11/2008 1:45:29 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 31 replies · 148+ views
    The Australian ^ | 8/6/08 | Luke Slattery
    The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius's eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secretsSTORED in a sky-lit reading room on the top floor of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Naples are the charred remains of the only library to survive from classical antiquity. The ancient world's other great book collections -- at Athens, Alexandria and Rome -- all perished in the chaos of the centuries. But the library of the Villa of the Papyri was conserved, paradoxically, by an act of destruction. Lying to the northwest of ancient Herculaneum, this...
  • Rare Ancient Wooden Throne Found in Herculaneum (Buried by Eruption of Mt. Vesuvius)

    12/04/2007 10:45:07 AM PST · by Pyro7480 · 28 replies · 472+ views
    Yahoo! News (Reuters) ^ | 12/4/2007 | n/a
    ROME (Reuters) - An ancient Roman wood and ivory throne has been unearthed at a dig in Herculaneum, Italian archaeologists said on Tuesday, hailing it as the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there. The throne was found during an excavation in the Villa of the Papyri, the private house formerly belonging to Julius Caesar's father-in-law, Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, built on the slope of Mount Vesuvius. The name of the villa derives from the impressive library containing thousands of scrolls of papyrus discovered buried under meters (yards) of volcanic ash after the Vesuvius erupted on 24 August...
  • Focus: The search for the lost library of Rome

    02/01/2005 10:08:49 AM PST · by snarks_when_bored · 27 replies · 2,086+ views
    Times Online (U.K.) ^ | January 23, 2005 | Robert Harris
    Focus: The search for the lost library of RomeRobert HarrisEven in our age of hyperbole, it would be hard to exaggerate the significance of what is at stake here: nothing less than the lost intellectual inheritance of western civilisation Down a side street in the seedy Italian town of Ercolano, wafted by the scent of uncollected rubbish and the fumes of passing motor-scooters, lies a waterlogged hole. A track leads from it to a high fence and a locked gate. Dogs defecate in the undergrowth where addicts discard their needles. Peering into the dark, stagnant water it is hard to...
  • Latin Course Stage 6 (Pompeii Slave Girl)

    07/18/2004 7:24:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 5,740+ views
    Cambridge ^ | 2004 | University of Cambridge
    Gold bracelet found on arm of (slave?) girl killed near Pompeii by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. On the inside of the bracelet is carved "from the Master to his slave girl" (DOM[I]NUS ANCILLAE SUAE).
  • Herculean task for modern scholars - More on the Discovered Roman Literature being unearthed.

    04/05/2002 3:43:19 PM PST · by vannrox · 41 replies · 1,477+ views
    The UK Times ^ | April 05, 2002 | By Robert Fowler
    Herculean task for modern scholars By Robert Fowler ALMOST all the texts we have of the ancient classics derive from generations of scribal copies, separated by many centuries from the originals. Most works of classical literature — some 90 per cent — were not even lucky enough to be copied and survive into modern times. Very occasionally, the archaeologist’s spade turns up fragments of books written in antiquity itself, allowing us direct access to lost works and what the ancients said. Some celebrated sites, such as Oxyrhynchus in Egypt, have yielded up splendid finds. Yet strangely, the most spectacular of...