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Keyword: vesuvius

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  • Today is the anniversary of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and destruction of Pompeii in A.D. 79.

    08/24/2017 6:38:33 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 15 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 08/23/2017 | Harpygoddess
    Today is the anniversary of the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79 and the death of Pliny the Elder (born A.D. 23) in that event. The eruption, which followed several years of precursor ground movements, buried the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum and is thought to have killed as many as 15,000 people. Subsequent major eruptions occurred in 1631, 1906, and 1944, the last just after the Allies had taken the city of Naples in World War II. Pliny the Elder is remembered primarily for his "Natural History," a comprehensive compendium of ancient knowledge of the natural world....
  • X-Ray Reveals Ancient Roman Portrait Covered in Mt. Vesuvius Ash

    08/22/2017 7:04:30 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    Seeeker ^ | August 21, 2017 | Jen Viegas
    Excavations in the mid-19th century uncovered much of Herculaneum, including its large “House of the Mosaic Atrium,” but an ancient painting in the house went almost unnoticed, until now. A newly developed portable macro X-ray fluorescence instrument, ELIO by XGLab SRL, revealed the Roman woman in the portrait that has been subjected to molten lava, volcanic ash, grime, salt, and humidity over the years. As if that weren’t rough treatment enough, its exposure since it was excavated 70 years ago has caused much of it to deteriorate. The portable X-ray instrument was brought directly to the site at Herculaneum, where...
  • Europe’s Most Dangerous Supervolcano Is Waking Up; 500,000 Lives At Risk

    01/10/2017 5:16:20 AM PST · by gaggs · 34 replies
    When Mount Vesuvius erupted and buried the Italian city of Pompeii in ash, killing 2,000 people, it was regarded as one of the most catastrophic natural disasters and is still studied heavily today. By comparison, a nearby supervolcano called Campi Flegrei, which means “burning fields,” would put the lives of 500,000 Italians at risk and cause damage that would extend to the surrounding nations.
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • Study Sheds Light On Ancient Roman Water System In Naples

    05/18/2016 1:46:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, May 16, 2016 | editors
    A study suggests that lead isotopes can reveal the history of ancient Roman water distribution systems. The impact of the Vesuvius volcanic eruption in AD 79 on the water supply of Naples and other nearby cities has been a matter of debate. Hugo Delile and colleagues measured lead isotopic compositions of a well-dated sedimentary sequence from the excavated ancient harbor of Naples. The isotopic composition of leachates from the harbor sediments differed from those of lead native to the region, suggesting contamination from imported lead used in the ancient plumbing. The authors observed an abrupt change in isotopic composition in...
  • Excavations at Idalion, Cyprus: Crossing Cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean [April 6, 2016]

    04/01/2016 12:03:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    via Biblical Archaeology ^ | April 2016 | JCCGW
    Excavations at Idalion, Cyprus: Crossing Cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean 8 p.m. JCCGW Theatre 6125 Montrose Road Rockville, MD Ann-Marie Knoblauch | Virginia Tech University Co-Sponsored by the Hellenic Society Prometheas Cyprus was an important trade center and cultural ‘crossroad’ in antiquity, controlled and influenced in different periods by the Mycenaean civilization, the sea-faring Phoenicians and Philistines of the Bible, Archaic Greece, the Persians in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Roman Empire, and even Christian Byzantium. The ancient site of Idalion is fortuitously situated near the copper-rich mountains of Cyprus and the harbors of the coast.  This prime location led to the...
  • Metallic ink used in the Herculaneum scrolls

    03/23/2016 3:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, March 21, 2016 | editors, source Emmanuel Brun et al.
    Analysis of Herculaneum papyrus scroll fragments reveals the use of metallic ink in Greco-Roman literary inscription centuries earlier than previously thought, according to a study*. Scholars of ancient scrolls hold that texts from antiquity, particularly Greek and Latin literary manuscripts produced until the fourth century AD, were largely written in carbon-based ink on papyri, the fibrous structure of which allowed scribes to jettison ruling lines. Vito Mocella and colleagues used nondestructive synchrotron X-ray-based methods to chemically analyze the barely visible black inscriptions on two nearly flat, multilayered papyrus fragments that were found at the Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum in...
  • How Pompeii brought ancient Roman wine back to life

    02/27/2016 12:39:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | February 25, 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Made from ancient grape varieties grown in Pompeii, 'Villa dei Misteri' has to be one of the world's most exclusive wines. The grapes are planted in exactly the same position, grown using identical techniques and grow from the same soil the city's wine-makers exploited until Vesuvius buried the city and its inhabitants in AD 79. In the late 1800s, archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli first excavated some of the city's vineyards from beneath three metres of solid ash. The digs turned up an almost perfect snapshot of ancient wine-growing - and thirteen petrified corpses, huddled against a wall. Casts were made of...
  • Lethal Thermal Impact at Periphery of Pyroclastic Surges: Evidences at Pompeii

    06/18/2010 5:51:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 367+ views
    Public Library of Science ^ | June 2010 | Giuseppe Mastrolorenzo, Pierpaolo Petrone, Lucia Pappalardo, Fabio M. Guarino
    The evaluation of mortality of pyroclastic surges and flows (PDCs) produced by explosive eruptions is a major goal in risk assessment and mitigation, particularly in distal reaches of flows that are often heavily urbanized. Pompeii and the nearby archaeological sites preserve the most complete set of evidence of the 79 AD catastrophic eruption recording its effects on structures and people. Here we investigate the causes of mortality in PDCs at Pompeii and surroundings on the bases of a multidisciplinary volcanological and bio-anthropological study. Field and laboratory study of the eruption products and victims merged with numerical simulations and experiments indicate...
  • Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs: the Roman diet revealed

    06/14/2011 4:45:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2011 | Nick Squires
    Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs were among the delicacies enjoyed by ordinary Romans, British archaeologists have revealed after discovering a giant septic tank at one of the ancient cities destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius... Archaeologists found a treasure trove of everyday artefacts after digging up nearly 800 sacks of compacted human waste from the tank, which lies beneath the remains of a Roman apartment block in Herculaneum, destroyed after it was buried by ash from the volcano in AD79. The British team has found hundreds of objects, including bronze coins, precious stones, bone hair pins and an...
  • Reading the Writing on Pompeii’s Walls

    08/01/2010 12:30:43 PM PDT · by markomalley · 44 replies · 3+ views
    Smithstonian ^ | 7/27/2010 | Kristin Ohlson
    Rebecca Benefiel stepped into the tiny dark room on the first floor of the House of Maius Castricius. Mosquitoes whined. Huge moths flapped around her head. And – much higher on the ick meter—her flashlight revealed a desiccated corpse that looked as if it was struggling to rise from the floor. Nonetheless, she moved closer to the walls and searched for aberrations in the stucco. She soon found what she was looking for: a string of names and a cluster of numbers, part of the vibrant graffiti chitchat carried on by the citizens of Pompeii before Mount Vesuvius erupted in...
  • Buried city of Pompeii unveils three new houses [well, not new...]

    04/20/2014 6:28:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    ANSA/UPI ^ | April 17, 2014 | Ed Adamczyk
    There is new real state to be seen in the Pompeii, Italy, archaeological site, with three restored houses open to the public. In time for Easter tourists, three additional houses in the ancient city of Pompeii, Italy, buried in a volcano eruption in 79 A.D., were opened Thursday. Italian Culture Minister Dario Franceschini inaugurated the three restored houses, or domus, in a ceremony at the celebrated archeological site. The houses were formerly occupied by the families of Marcus Lucretius Fronto, Romulus and Remus and Trittolemo, the office of Pompeii’s archeological superintendent said. Superintendent Massimo Osanna described them as “aristocratic houses.”...
  • Pompeii's Mystery Horse Is a Donkey

    11/03/2010 8:28:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 1+ views
    Softpedia ^ | Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 | Smaranda Biliuti
    Back in 2004, when academics unearthed skeletons found at a house in the ancient Roman town that was covered in ashes in 79 AD, they thought it belonged to an extinct breed of horse... What happened really was that there seems to have been a mix-up in the lab, which led to horse DNA being combined with donkey DNA, creating an artificial hybrid that actually never existed. Six years ago, the skeletons of equids having belonged to a rich Roman household in Pompeii were analyzed. There were found in the stables of a probably wealthy politician, and all five of...
  • Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese

    10/10/2002 11:02:29 AM PDT · by chance33_98 · 49 replies · 681+ views
    Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese Oct. 9 — By E. J. Mundell NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A tiny piece of cheese, carbonized in the volcanic eruption that killed the citizens of Pompeii, is yielding up secrets as to how ancient Romans ate, lived and died. Using an electron microscope, anthropological researcher Dr. Luigi Capasso of the State University G. d'Annunzio in Chieti, Italy, has been able to pinpoint goats' milk cheese as a prime source of brucellosis--a debilitating joint disease that ravaged the ancient world. "Roman cheese was an important and continuous source of possible infectious...
  • [from January 3, 2014] Giraffe Was on Menu in Pompeii Restaurants

    07/02/2015 8:13:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Discovery News ^ | January 3, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Giraffe was on the menu in Pompeii's standard restaurants, says a new research into a non-elite section of the ancient Roman city buried by Mount Vesuvius' eruption in 79 A.D. The study, which will be presented on Jan. 4 at the Archaeological Institute of America and American Philological Association Joint Annual Meeting in Chicago, draws on a multi-year excavation in a forgotten area inside one of the busiest gates of Pompeii, the Porta Stabia. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, said his team has spent more than a decade researching the life of the middle and...
  • Pompeii Find Shows Secrets Of The Samnites

    07/04/2004 5:44:51 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 2,987+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7-5-2004 | Bruce Johnston
    Pompeii find shows secrets of the Samnites By Bruce Johnston in Rome (Filed: 05/07/2004) The discovery in Pompeii of a pre-Roman temple is being hailed as evidence that the city was sophisticated and thriving 300 years before Vesuvius erupted. The temple is said to be of Mephitis, a female deity worshipped by the Samnites, a mysterious ancient people who preceded the Romans in Pompeii. The temple complex includes a sanctuary where it is thought girls from good families worked briefly in "sacred prostitution" as a rite of passage to full womanhood. The Samnites were previously thought of as mountain warriors,...
  • Pompei Discovery For Swedish Archaeologists

    04/17/2005 1:36:52 PM PDT · by blam · 50 replies · 1,380+ views
    The Local ^ | 4-17-2005
    Published: 17th April 2005 11:48 BST+1 Pompei discovery for Swedish archeologists (AFP) Swedish archeologists have discovered a Stone Age settlement covered in ash under the ruins of the ancient city of Pompei, indicating that the volcano Vesuvius engulfed the area in lava more than 3,500 years before the famous 79 AD eruption. The archeologists recently found burnt wood and grains of corn in the earth under Pompei, Anne-Marie Leander Touati, a professor of archeology at Stockholm University who led the team, told AFP. "Carbon dating shows that the finds are from prehistoric times, that is, from 3,500 years BC," Leander...
  • 'Bronze Age Pompeii' Found In Italy

    12/06/2001 6:52:22 AM PST · by blam · 18 replies · 2+ views
    Discovery ^ | 12-03-2001
    'Bronze Age Pompeii' Found in Italy Dec. 3 — Italian archaeologists have discovered one of the world's best-preserved prehistoric villages, a "Bronze Age Pompeii" that was buried in volcanic ash near the world-famous Roman city almost 4,000 years ago. The ancient settlement was overwhelmed by volcanic flow when Mount Vesuvius erupted around 1800 B.C., smothering the village near present-day Nola in southern Italy many centuries before Pompeii suffered the same fate. "This is by far the best-preserved prehistoric village in Italy and one of the best in the world. Everyday life in the ancient Bronze Age is preserved there," Giuseppe ...
  • First Pompeii Uncovered (3rd Century BC)

    02/04/2007 2:34:35 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 1,075+ views
    Ansa ^ | 2-1-2007
    First Pompeii uncoveredSamnites founded city in Third Century BC (ANSA) - Rome, February 1 - The origins of the famed buried city of Pompeii have emerged from years of excavations, an international conference in Rome was told Thursday. The first Pompeii was not built by the Romans or even by the Greeks who preceded them, but by an ancient people called the Samnites, Pompeii heritage Superintendent Piero Guzzo told a packed audience of archaeologists and scholars. Wielding photos of inscriptions, votive offerings and even entire buildings, Guzzo said "a new season of studies has begun". "For the first time we...
  • Pillar at Pompei villa collapses

    12/24/2011 9:22:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Monsters and Critics ^ | Thursday, December 22, 2011 | Deutsche Presse-Agentur
    A pillar has collapsed at one of Pompeii's most well-preserved buildings, officials in Italy said Thursday, the latest in a series of accidents to befall the treasured archaeological site. The collapse took place on an external area of the House of Loreius Tiburtinus - also known as the House of Octavius Quartio - the office of Archaeological Heritage of Naples and Pompeii, said in a statement. Officials were in the process of inspecting the causes and extent of the damage, the statement added. The House of Loreius Tiburtinus is renowned for its artwork and large gardens. In October a portion...