Keyword: volcanism

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  • Early Volcanoes Minted Nickel

    11/22/2009 9:59:56 AM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies · 821+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 20 November 2009 | Phil Berardelli
    Enlarge ImageGreen gold. A complex geological process produced this sample of nickel sulfide. Credit: Marco Fiorentini, Science Those spare nickels in your pocket might not be there without the help of ancient volcanoes that blasted sulfur dioxide into the sky billions of years ago. The discovery solves a mystery that has dogged researchers for decades, says geochemist Edward Ripley of Indiana University, Bloomington, who was not affiliated with the study. The nickel in ore deposits is actually nickel sulfide, a compound that is rich in sulfur. The sulfur is "critically important," says geochemist Douglas Rumble of the Carnegie Institution...
  • An Icelandic Epic Predicted a Fiery End for Pagan Gods, and Then This Volcano Erupted

    04/15/2018 8:46:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Livescience ^ | March 20, 2018 | Laura Geggel
    A series of Earth-shattering volcanic eruptions in Iceland during the Middle Ages may have spurred the people living there to turn away from their pagan gods and convert to Christianity, a new study finds. The discovery came about thanks to precise dating of the volcanic eruptions, which spewed lava about two generations before the Icelandic people changed religions. But why would volcanic eruptions turn people toward monotheism? The answer has to do with the "Voluspa," a prominent medieval poem that predicted a fiery eruption would help lead to the downfall of the pagan gods, the researchers said. Historians have long...
  • A supervolcano caused the largest eruption in European history. Now it’s stirring again.

    12/22/2016 7:41:58 PM PST · by JimSEA · 31 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 12/21/2016 | Sarah Kaplan
    The Italian name for the caldera — Campi Flegrei, or “burning fields”— is apt. The 7.5-mile-wide cauldron is the collapsed top of an ancient volcano, formed when the magma within finally blew. Though half of it is obscured beneath the crystal blue waters of the Mediterranean, the other half is studded with cinder cones and calderas from smaller eruptions. And the whole area seethes with hydrothermal activity: Sulfuric acid spews from active fumaroles; geysers spout water and steam and the ground froths with boiling mud; and earthquake swarms shudder through the region, 125 miles south of Rome. And things seem...
  • Asteroid Theory of Dinosaur Extinction Questioned

    03/01/2004 8:54:16 PM PST · by anymouse · 7 replies · 807+ views
    Reuters ^ | Mon Mar 1, 2004 | Maggie Fox
    Scientists probing a vast crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula questioned a popular theory about dinosaurs on Monday, saying the collision that formed the crater happened too far back in time to have caused their extinction by itself. Much evidence points to the idea that an asteroid or comet gouged the Earth around 65 million years ago, triggering volcanic and climate changes that eventually wiped out the dinosaurs. When the huge, mostly underwater crater was found off Yucatan, it seemed the perfect candidate. "Since the early 1990s the Chicxulub crater on Yucatan, Mexico, has been hailed as the smoking gun that...
  • Volcanic activity worldwide 1 Jun 2016:

    06/02/2016 12:33:24 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 10 replies
    Volcano Discovery Blog ^ | Various | Dr. Tom Pfeiffer
    Volcanic activity worldwide 1 Jun 2016: Colima volcano, Bromo, Semeru, Dukono, Turrialba, Nyiragongo...
  • Sangeang Api volcano (Sunda Islands, Indonesia): eruption continues, ash spreads to Australia

    05/31/2014 6:30:16 AM PDT · by Excellence · 20 replies
    Volcano Discovery ^ | May 31, 2014 | T
    Eruptions continue at the volcano after yesterday's major explosion. Dense ash plumes rising from the summit crater can be seen on this morning's satellite images, and a MODIS hot spot is visible on the latest satellite data, suggesting fresh magma continues to arrive at the volcano's summit crater. In the meanwhile, the ash and SO2 plume has drifted and spread over more than 3000 km to the E and SE, covering a vast area that includes parts of northern and eastern Australia.
  • Swarm of earthquakes in Alaska puzzles scientists

    06/16/2014 6:24:07 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 16, 2014 6:30 PM EDT | Rachel D’Oro
    A moderate earthquake shook northwest Alaska on Monday, the fifth temblor of the same magnitude since April in an area with otherwise little activity, seismologists said. The magnitude-5.7 quake struck at 4:01 a.m. Monday northeast of the village of Noatak, the Alaska Earthquake Center reported. As with other temblors in the earthquake swarm, the quake was felt in Noatak, an Inupiat Eskimo community of 560 people. […] The series of earthquakes has scientists puzzled about activity that is considered very unusual in the area. “At this point, we don’t really understand the nature of these earthquakes,” (earthquake center seismologist Natasha)...
  • Which Volcano is the World's Largest?

    06/15/2014 9:44:33 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Geology News ^ | 6/15/2014 | Hobart King
    Tamu Massif: The Most Massive Volcano Most of the world's largest features are so clearly visible that they have been known and recognized for hundreds of years. One exception is Tamu Massif. It is now recognized to be a single volcano - instead of a volcano complex with multiple vents. Tamu Massif has a footprint that covers more area than any other volcano - about 120,000 square miles (310,800 square kilometers) - an area about the size of New Mexico. It also has a larger mass than any other known single volcano on Earth. How could this enormous volcano have...
  • Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals

    02/16/2014 8:28:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Gazetta Delsud ^ | 3/06/2013 | unattributed
    'Catastrophic' event at Campi Flegrei 39,000 years ago Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals Some researchers are suggesting that Neanderthals were driven to extinction by a massive volcanic eruption near Naples. The suggestion is one of the topics under debate this week at a conference at London's British Museum examining what forces led to the destruction of the Neanderthals and what led to the triumph of the homo sapiens. One new theory holds that a gigantic eruption of the volcano in the Campi Flegrei area near Naples 39,000 years ago was catastrophic for the Neanderthals. That was the...
  • Volcanoes Killed Off Neanderthals, Study Suggests

    09/24/2010 8:52:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | September 22, 2010 | Ker Than
    The Neanderthals were a hardy species that lived through multiple ice ages and would have been familiar with volcanoes and other natural calamities. But the eruptions 40,000 years ago were unlike anything Neanderthals had faced before, Cleghorn and company say. For one thing, all the volcanoes apparently erupted around the same time. And one of those blasts, the Campanian Ignimbrite, is thought to have been the most powerful eruption in Europe in the last 200,000 years... The researchers acknowledge that there are gaps in the volcanoes theory. For instance, the time line needs to be better defined -- did...
  • Dating the Uluzzian

    02/15/2014 6:08:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | February 09, 2014 | Journal of Human Evolution
    Researchers have securely dated a prehistoric human stone tool industry that is thought to have been used by early modern humans, or possibly late Neanderthals, around the time when early modern humans were beginning to emerge in Europe, arguably sometime between 40,000 to 50,000 years B.P... The Uluzzian, a prehistoric stone tool techno-tradition represented by lithic artifacts unearthed by archaeologists at cave locations primarily in Italy and Greece, has been a central contender as a possible "transitional" industry between the typical stone tool types (the Mousterian) used by late European Neanderthals and those (Aurignacian, Châtelperronian) of the earliest modern human...
  • ARCHAEOLOGY: New Carbon Dates Support Revised History of Ancient Mediterranean

    04/27/2006 4:59:30 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 77 replies · 2,583+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 4/28/2006 | Michael Balter
    During the Late Bronze Age, the Aegean volcanic island of Thera erupted violently, spreading pumice and ash across the eastern Mediterranean and triggering frosts as far away as what is now California. The Theran town of Akrotiri was completely buried. Tsunamis up to 12 meters high crashed onto the shores of Crete, 110 kilometers to the south, and the cataclysm may ultimately have sped the demise of Crete's famed Minoan civilization. For nearly 30 years, archaeologists have fought over when the eruption took place. Those who rely on dates from pottery styles and Egyptian inscriptions put the event at roughly...
  • Scientists: Volcanoes ‘scream’ before erupting

    07/15/2013 11:55:17 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Science Recorder ^ | Tuesday, July 16, 2013 | Delila James
    An analysis of data from the March 2009 eruption of Alaska’s Redoubt Volcano reveals that harmonic tremors reached high “scream” frequencies before suddenly stopping at five eruptions, according a University of Washington (UW) press release. Lead author Alicia Hotovec-Ellis, a UW doctoral student in Earth and space sciences, said that the extraordinarily high frequency of this tremor is not easily explained by many of the currently accepted theories. In fact, Redoubt’s volcanic wail reaches such a pitch it can be heard by human ears. “The pitch that Redoubt got up to was so much higher than any other volcano that...
  • Volcanoes Behind Earth's Cooling; China and India Exonerated

    03/01/2013 7:18:02 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    scienceworldreport ^ | Mar 01, 2013 09:19 PM EST
    Volcanoes have more impact on earth’s climate than previously thought, scientists at the University of Colorado have found. The researchers came across the finding as they looked for reasons our planet has not heated up as much as expected. The mainstream explanation was that the development in Asia (China and India, essentially) – where the industrial sulfur dioxide emissions increased 60 percent from 2000 to 2010, mainly driven by coal burning – was behind the cooling of Earth. According to the study by Ryan Neely which helped cement the mainstream view, small amounts of sulfur dioxide emissions from Earth's surface...
  • Will Ancient Akrotiri Face Another Massive Eruption?

    09/21/2012 5:50:59 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | September 2012
    The ancient Minoan city of Akrotiri was destroyed by a massive eruption over 3,000 years ago. Will it happen again soon to the excavated remains and the modern town? Scientists uncover some possible signs..... Now, a new survey suggests that a chamber of molten rock beneath Santorini's volcano has expanded 10-20 million cubic metres – up to 15 times the size of London's Olympic Stadium – between January 2011 and April 2012. The growth of this 'balloon' of magma has seen the surface of the island rise 8-14 centimetres during this period, a team led by Oxford University scientists has...
  • Mexico's Popocatépetl sleeping volcano awakens

    04/15/2012 10:37:19 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 20 replies
    chron.com ^ | 15 Apr 2012 | Dudley Althaus
    MEXICO CITY - Popocatépetl, the nearly 18,000 foot volcano that hovers like a sentinel on the southeastern fringe of Mexico's capital, awakened again Sunday, punctuating an especially shaky seismic season. Popo, as the mountain is widely called, spewed at least seven exhalations overnight Saturday and through the day Sunday, sending vapor, smoke and gas billowing into the clear sky. The most serious occurred just after 9 a.m. Sunday, sending a vapor cloud a mile into the air. Mexico's National Disaster Prevention Center issued a precautionary warning to residents, advising them to stay alert for a worsening situation and to keep...
  • The Pseudo-Scientists are back for another round of propaganda

    12/02/2011 12:46:04 PM PST · by publius321 · 17 replies · 1+ views
    http://www.tableofwisdom.com ^ | November 27, 2011 | Scott Anderson
    They come out from under their rocks every time we have a few tornados and never miss an opening when it comes to exploiting popular ignorance. An AP column last Friday titled Science panel: Get ready for extreme weather opened by asserting – “Think of the Texas drought, floods in Thailand and Russia's devastating heat waves as coming attractions in a warming world. That is the warning from top international climate scientists and disaster experts after meeting in Africa.” And of course their thesis is that this weather is the fault of mankind. They fail to mention that for the...
  • The eruption of a volcano in Virunga National Park near Goma is seen at night.

    11/26/2011 12:47:28 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    Oman Daily Observer ^ | Sun, 27 November 2011
    The eruption of a volcano in Virunga National Park near Goma is seen at night. Volcano fanatics will have to pay $300...The eruption of a volcano in Virunga National Park near Goma is seen at night. Almost three weeks after a fissure opened amidst dense flat forest, the Democratic Republic of Congo's Virunga National Park has seen an increasing number of tourists seeking to be guided on treks to witness the Nyamulagira volcano spewing geysers of lava into the night.
  • Study: CO2 may not warm the planet as much as thought

    11/25/2011 5:29:44 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 49 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 11/25/2011 | by Michael Marshall
    The climate may be less sensitive to carbon dioxide than we thought – and temperature rises this century could be smaller than expected. That's the surprise result of a new analysis of the last ice age. However, the finding comes from considering just one climate model, and unless it can be replicated using other models, researchers are dubious that it is genuine. As more greenhouse gases enter the atmosphere, more heat is trapped and temperatures go up – but by how much? The best estimates say that if the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere doubles, temperatures will rise...
  • Brrr… New York City Expecting Earliest Significant Snowfall Since Civil War

    10/29/2011 12:17:42 PM PDT · by george76 · 50 replies
    gateway ^ | October 29, 2011 | Jim Hoft
    It must be global warming climate change. New York City is expecting its earliest snow storm since the Civil War.