Keyword: volcanism

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  • Sangeang Api volcano (Sunda Islands, Indonesia): eruption continues, ash spreads to Australia

    05/31/2014 6:30:16 AM PDT · by Excellence · 20 replies
    Volcano Discovery ^ | May 31, 2014 | T
    Eruptions continue at the volcano after yesterday's major explosion. Dense ash plumes rising from the summit crater can be seen on this morning's satellite images, and a MODIS hot spot is visible on the latest satellite data, suggesting fresh magma continues to arrive at the volcano's summit crater. In the meanwhile, the ash and SO2 plume has drifted and spread over more than 3000 km to the E and SE, covering a vast area that includes parts of northern and eastern Australia.
  • Swarm of earthquakes in Alaska puzzles scientists

    06/16/2014 6:24:07 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 18 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 16, 2014 6:30 PM EDT | Rachel D’Oro
    A moderate earthquake shook northwest Alaska on Monday, the fifth temblor of the same magnitude since April in an area with otherwise little activity, seismologists said. The magnitude-5.7 quake struck at 4:01 a.m. Monday northeast of the village of Noatak, the Alaska Earthquake Center reported. As with other temblors in the earthquake swarm, the quake was felt in Noatak, an Inupiat Eskimo community of 560 people. […] The series of earthquakes has scientists puzzled about activity that is considered very unusual in the area. “At this point, we don’t really understand the nature of these earthquakes,” (earthquake center seismologist Natasha)...
  • Which Volcano is the World's Largest?

    06/15/2014 9:44:33 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Geology News ^ | 6/15/2014 | Hobart King
    Tamu Massif: The Most Massive Volcano Most of the world's largest features are so clearly visible that they have been known and recognized for hundreds of years. One exception is Tamu Massif. It is now recognized to be a single volcano - instead of a volcano complex with multiple vents. Tamu Massif has a footprint that covers more area than any other volcano - about 120,000 square miles (310,800 square kilometers) - an area about the size of New Mexico. It also has a larger mass than any other known single volcano on Earth. How could this enormous volcano have...
  • Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals

    02/16/2014 8:28:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Gazetta Delsud ^ | 3/06/2013 | unattributed
    'Catastrophic' event at Campi Flegrei 39,000 years ago Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals Some researchers are suggesting that Neanderthals were driven to extinction by a massive volcanic eruption near Naples. The suggestion is one of the topics under debate this week at a conference at London's British Museum examining what forces led to the destruction of the Neanderthals and what led to the triumph of the homo sapiens. One new theory holds that a gigantic eruption of the volcano in the Campi Flegrei area near Naples 39,000 years ago was catastrophic for the Neanderthals. That was the...
  • Volcanoes Killed Off Neanderthals, Study Suggests

    09/24/2010 8:52:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | September 22, 2010 | Ker Than
    The Neanderthals were a hardy species that lived through multiple ice ages and would have been familiar with volcanoes and other natural calamities. But the eruptions 40,000 years ago were unlike anything Neanderthals had faced before, Cleghorn and company say. For one thing, all the volcanoes apparently erupted around the same time. And one of those blasts, the Campanian Ignimbrite, is thought to have been the most powerful eruption in Europe in the last 200,000 years... The researchers acknowledge that there are gaps in the volcanoes theory. For instance, the time line needs to be better defined -- did...
  • Dating the Uluzzian

    02/15/2014 6:08:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | February 09, 2014 | Journal of Human Evolution
    Researchers have securely dated a prehistoric human stone tool industry that is thought to have been used by early modern humans, or possibly late Neanderthals, around the time when early modern humans were beginning to emerge in Europe, arguably sometime between 40,000 to 50,000 years B.P... The Uluzzian, a prehistoric stone tool techno-tradition represented by lithic artifacts unearthed by archaeologists at cave locations primarily in Italy and Greece, has been a central contender as a possible "transitional" industry between the typical stone tool types (the Mousterian) used by late European Neanderthals and those (Aurignacian, Châtelperronian) of the earliest modern human...
  • ARCHAEOLOGY: New Carbon Dates Support Revised History of Ancient Mediterranean

    04/27/2006 4:59:30 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 77 replies · 2,583+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 4/28/2006 | Michael Balter
    During the Late Bronze Age, the Aegean volcanic island of Thera erupted violently, spreading pumice and ash across the eastern Mediterranean and triggering frosts as far away as what is now California. The Theran town of Akrotiri was completely buried. Tsunamis up to 12 meters high crashed onto the shores of Crete, 110 kilometers to the south, and the cataclysm may ultimately have sped the demise of Crete's famed Minoan civilization. For nearly 30 years, archaeologists have fought over when the eruption took place. Those who rely on dates from pottery styles and Egyptian inscriptions put the event at roughly...
  • Scientists: Volcanoes ‘scream’ before erupting

    07/15/2013 11:55:17 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Science Recorder ^ | Tuesday, July 16, 2013 | Delila James
    An analysis of data from the March 2009 eruption of Alaska’s Redoubt Volcano reveals that harmonic tremors reached high “scream” frequencies before suddenly stopping at five eruptions, according a University of Washington (UW) press release. Lead author Alicia Hotovec-Ellis, a UW doctoral student in Earth and space sciences, said that the extraordinarily high frequency of this tremor is not easily explained by many of the currently accepted theories. In fact, Redoubt’s volcanic wail reaches such a pitch it can be heard by human ears. “The pitch that Redoubt got up to was so much higher than any other volcano that...
  • Volcanoes Behind Earth's Cooling; China and India Exonerated

    03/01/2013 7:18:02 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    scienceworldreport ^ | Mar 01, 2013 09:19 PM EST
    Volcanoes have more impact on earth’s climate than previously thought, scientists at the University of Colorado have found. The researchers came across the finding as they looked for reasons our planet has not heated up as much as expected. The mainstream explanation was that the development in Asia (China and India, essentially) – where the industrial sulfur dioxide emissions increased 60 percent from 2000 to 2010, mainly driven by coal burning – was behind the cooling of Earth. According to the study by Ryan Neely which helped cement the mainstream view, small amounts of sulfur dioxide emissions from Earth's surface...
  • Will Ancient Akrotiri Face Another Massive Eruption?

    09/21/2012 5:50:59 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | September 2012
    The ancient Minoan city of Akrotiri was destroyed by a massive eruption over 3,000 years ago. Will it happen again soon to the excavated remains and the modern town? Scientists uncover some possible signs..... Now, a new survey suggests that a chamber of molten rock beneath Santorini's volcano has expanded 10-20 million cubic metres – up to 15 times the size of London's Olympic Stadium – between January 2011 and April 2012. The growth of this 'balloon' of magma has seen the surface of the island rise 8-14 centimetres during this period, a team led by Oxford University scientists has...
  • Mexico's Popocatépetl sleeping volcano awakens

    04/15/2012 10:37:19 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 20 replies
    chron.com ^ | 15 Apr 2012 | Dudley Althaus
    MEXICO CITY - Popocatépetl, the nearly 18,000 foot volcano that hovers like a sentinel on the southeastern fringe of Mexico's capital, awakened again Sunday, punctuating an especially shaky seismic season. Popo, as the mountain is widely called, spewed at least seven exhalations overnight Saturday and through the day Sunday, sending vapor, smoke and gas billowing into the clear sky. The most serious occurred just after 9 a.m. Sunday, sending a vapor cloud a mile into the air. Mexico's National Disaster Prevention Center issued a precautionary warning to residents, advising them to stay alert for a worsening situation and to keep...
  • The Pseudo-Scientists are back for another round of propaganda

    12/02/2011 12:46:04 PM PST · by publius321 · 17 replies · 1+ views
    http://www.tableofwisdom.com ^ | November 27, 2011 | Scott Anderson
    They come out from under their rocks every time we have a few tornados and never miss an opening when it comes to exploiting popular ignorance. An AP column last Friday titled Science panel: Get ready for extreme weather opened by asserting – “Think of the Texas drought, floods in Thailand and Russia's devastating heat waves as coming attractions in a warming world. That is the warning from top international climate scientists and disaster experts after meeting in Africa.” And of course their thesis is that this weather is the fault of mankind. They fail to mention that for the...
  • The eruption of a volcano in Virunga National Park near Goma is seen at night.

    11/26/2011 12:47:28 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    Oman Daily Observer ^ | Sun, 27 November 2011
    The eruption of a volcano in Virunga National Park near Goma is seen at night. Volcano fanatics will have to pay $300...The eruption of a volcano in Virunga National Park near Goma is seen at night. Almost three weeks after a fissure opened amidst dense flat forest, the Democratic Republic of Congo's Virunga National Park has seen an increasing number of tourists seeking to be guided on treks to witness the Nyamulagira volcano spewing geysers of lava into the night.
  • Study: CO2 may not warm the planet as much as thought

    11/25/2011 5:29:44 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 49 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 11/25/2011 | by Michael Marshall
    The climate may be less sensitive to carbon dioxide than we thought – and temperature rises this century could be smaller than expected. That's the surprise result of a new analysis of the last ice age. However, the finding comes from considering just one climate model, and unless it can be replicated using other models, researchers are dubious that it is genuine. As more greenhouse gases enter the atmosphere, more heat is trapped and temperatures go up – but by how much? The best estimates say that if the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere doubles, temperatures will rise...
  • Brrr… New York City Expecting Earliest Significant Snowfall Since Civil War

    10/29/2011 12:17:42 PM PDT · by george76 · 50 replies
    gateway ^ | October 29, 2011 | Jim Hoft
    It must be global warming climate change. New York City is expecting its earliest snow storm since the Civil War.
  • Earthquake Activity Intensifies On El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    10/08/2011 8:36:04 AM PDT · by winoneforthegipper · 54 replies
    Irish Weather Online ^ | 10/08/11 | Mark Dunphy
    The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) has reported an increase in the intensity of earthquakes recorded on El Hierro, the smallest of The Canary Islands, during the last 24 to 36 hours. The number of earthquakes recorded since July 17 , 2011 on El Hierros has now reached 10,000, figures from the IGN confirm. The IGN also confirmed surface deformations exceeding 35mm on the 280-sqkm island, where residents have been put on alert for a possible volcanic eruption. However, seismologists have moved to reassure the local population that a volcanic eruption is not imminent. The agency confirmed on Friday that 890...
  • Volcano found on the Moon’s farside

    07/25/2011 8:49:24 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 44 replies
    watts up with that? ^ | July 25, 2011 | News Staff
    Posted on July 25, 2011 by News Staff Non-mare silicic volcanism on the lunar farside at Compton–Belkovich Bradley L. Jolliff,Sandra A. Wiseman,Samuel J. Lawrence,Thanh N. Tran,Mark S. Robinson,Hiroyuki Sato,B. Ray Hawke,Frank Scholten,Jürgen Oberst,Harald Hiesinger, Carolyn H. van der Bogert,Benjamin T. Greenhagen,Timothy D. Glotch& David A. Paige Nature Geoscience (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1212 Abstract Non-basaltic volcanism is rare on the Moon. The best known examples occur on the lunar nearside in the compositionally evolved Procellarum KREEP terrane. However, there is an isolated thorium-rich area—the Compton–Belkovich thorium anomaly—on the lunar farside for which the origin is enigmatic.
  • Icelandic Volcano 'Set To Erupt'

    02/09/2011 7:19:07 AM PST · by blam · 51 replies
    Icelandic Volcano 'Set To Erupt' Scientists in Iceland are warning that another volcano looks set to erupt and threatening to spew-out a pall of dust that would dwarf last year's event. Lava and ash explode out of the caldera of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano Photo: REUTERS 6:38PM GMT 08 Feb 2011 Geologists detected the high risk of a new eruption after evaluating an increased swarm of earthquakes around the island's second largest volcano. Pall Einarsson, a professor of geophysics at the University of Iceland, says the area around Bárdarbunga is showing signs of increased activity, which provides "good reason to worry"....
  • Icelandic volcano 'set to erupt' (Bardabinga)

    02/08/2011 12:07:27 PM PST · by TaraP · 36 replies
    Daily Telegraph ^ | Feb 8th, 2011 | Staff
    Scientists in Iceland are warning that another volcano looks set to erupt and threatening to spew-out a pall of dust that would dwarf last year's event.... Geologists detected the high risk of a new eruption after evaluating an increased swarm of earthquakes around the island's second largest volcano. Pall Einarsson, a professor of geophysics at the University of Iceland, says the area around Bárdarbunga is showing signs of increased activity, which provides "good reason to worry". He told the country's national TV station that a low number of seismometer measuring devices in the area is making it more difficult to...
  • Volcano Ash Disrupting Entertainer Events Globally

    04/18/2010 7:12:28 AM PDT · by Touch Not the Cat · 4 replies · 281+ views
    cbs2 ^ | Apr 18, 2010 5:00 am US/Pacific | DERRIK J. LANG,
    With almost two-thirds of Europe's flights grounded, cancelations and postponements were popping up across the entertainment landscape on Saturday as Icelandic scientists warned that volcanic activity had increased and showed no sign of abating. Organizers of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, Calif., tweeted that some acts were forced to pull out of the weekend event. British musicians The Cribs, Bad Lieutenant, Delphic, Talvin Singh and Gary Numan as well as Scottish rockers Frightened Rabbit and Chicago brass group Hypnotic Brass Ensemble, who were on tour in Europe, weren't able to make the lineup. "I can't tell...
  • Rapid Rifting Presages Future Events

    11/19/2009 8:22:01 AM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 54 replies · 1,847+ views
    ICR News ^ | November 19, 2009 | Brian Thomas, M.S.
    The Great Rift Valley extends some 4,000 miles southward from Syria north of Israel, through the Gulf of Aqaba, through Ethiopia, and all the way to Mozambique in southeast Africa. It harbors a giant fault, which has been under investigation as a model for sea floor spreading. A recent geologic event rent a gaping crack through the desert of Ethiopia, causing safety concerns for locals. These crustal plate motions may foreshadow rifting events further north in the Great Rift Valley...
  • Turtles Island-Hopped Their Way Across a Warm Arctic

    02/03/2009 9:53:46 PM PST · by neverdem · 15 replies · 637+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 2 February 2009 | Jackie Grom
    Enlarge ImageFrigid find. The location (red star) of the ancient turtle fossil (inset) is seen on a map centered on the North Pole. Researchers speculate that Asian turtles (red diamonds) migrated to North America (green squares) across an archipelago created by the Alpha Ridge. Credit: Tom Whitley Sometime about 90 million years ago, Asian turtles hit the road for North America. Although researchers thought that these reptiles had crawled around the globe via Russia and Alaska, new findings suggest that they may have taken a shortcut--over a series of islands now submerged under the Arctic Sea. The conclusions are...
  • Rumbling Alaska Volcano Threatens Anchorage

    01/29/2009 9:37:06 PM PST · by Canticle_of_Deborah · 40 replies · 1,809+ views
    Fox News ^ | January 30, 2009
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Mount Redoubt continues to rumble and simmer, prompting geologists to say this Alaska volcano could erupt "within days." Scientists from the Alaska Volcano Observatory have been monitoring activity round-the-clock since the weekend. If Mount Redoubt does erupt, it would be the first time this occurred in nearly 20 years. And if won't likely be pretty. History shows that volcanoes in Alaska, including Redoubt, typically erupt explosively, shooting ash almost eight miles high.
  • Southern California Hot Spot Hits 812 Degrees, Baffles Experts

    08/06/2008 10:49:47 AM PDT · by Ben Mugged · 60 replies · 127+ views
    Fox News ^ | August 06, 2008 | Unattributed
    The ground is so hot in one part of Southern California it can melt the shoes right off your feet. An unexplained "thermal anomaly" caused a patch of land in Ventura County, just north of Los Angeles, to reach a temperature of over 800 degrees on Friday, baffling experts who have been monitoring the area for weeks. The anomaly was discovered after the land got so hot that it started a brush fire and burned three acres last month. Firefighters were brought to the scene after reports of a blaze, but by the time they arrived only smoldering dirt and...
  • Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests

    10/25/2006 3:33:16 PM PDT · by blam · 94 replies · 2,818+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-24-2006 | GSA
    Source: Geological Society of America Date: October 24, 2006 Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests There's growing evidence that the dinosaurs and most their contemporaries were not wiped out by the famed Chicxulub meteor impact, according to a paleontologist who says multiple meteor impacts, massive volcanism in India, and climate changes culminated in the end of the Cretaceous Period. Cottonmouth Creek waterfall over the event deposit with reworked Chicxulub impact spherules. The original Chicxulub ejecta layer was discovered in a yellow clay layer 45 cm below the base of the event deposit. The yellow clay represents a...
  • Oceanographers rediscover Pop Rocks!

    10/17/2005 8:04:29 AM PDT · by cogitator · 2 replies · 335+ views
    TerraDaily ^ | October 17, 2005 | SPX
    Scientists aboard the Scripps research vessel Roger Revelle have solved a 45-year-old geological mystery. In 1960, Scripps oceanographer Dale Krause reported the discovery of extraordinary deep-sea volcanic rocks in waters off Mexico, near Guadalupe Island, approximately 200 miles south of San Diego. When brought to the surface, the rocks spontaneously exploded "with a sharp snapping sound," according to Krause. Since then, only a few other sites, mostly along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, have been reported with similar "popping rocks." An attempt by the late Scripps Professor Harmon Craig to locate the site in 1984 proved unsuccessful, largely because the location of...
  • SCIENTISTS REVISIT AN AEGEAN ERUPTION FAR WORSE THAN KRAKATOA

    10/24/2003 11:14:14 AM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 27 replies · 489+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 21 October 2003 | WILLIAM J. BROAD
    For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 70 miles from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland icecap reported evidence that Thera exploded in 1645 B.C., some 150 years before the usual date. That...
  • WEATHER OF MASS DESTRUCTION

    09/03/2003 5:58:25 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 14 replies · 418+ views
    Australian | 28 August 2003 | Australian
    As It Happened: The Day the Earth Nearly Died 8pm, SBS (2.30am, Perth) THINK of the wonderful profusion of life on Earth today. Then imagine 95 per cent of it dying in a terrible cataclysm. As this program from the BBC's Horizon series tells us, it's not a fantasy, it happened 250 million years ago, bringing the Permian period, with its myriad strange life-forms, crashing to an end and sending evolution into an abrupt reverse. The Permian mass extinction dwarfed the demise of the dinosaurs, caused by an asteroid strike 65 million years ago, when 60 per cent of species...
  • Bulge in lake worries YNP scientists

    07/31/2003 6:19:24 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 64 replies · 841+ views
    Cody Enterprise via Drudge ^ | 07/31/03 | By CAROLE CLOUDWALKER
    Bulge in lake worries YNP scientists By CAROLE CLOUDWALKER Beneath the serene surface of Yellowstone Lake, where death from hypothermia comes within 30 minutes, seethes a boiling underwater world. And like a pot too long on the stove, it could boil over, says U.S. Geological Survey geologist Lisa Morgan, Ph.D., of Colorado. She and others from the USGS have been studying the hottest hot spot in the 7,731-foot elevation lake, a spot which Morgan has termed an "inflated plain." It lies south-southwest of Storm Point near Mary Bay, in the northern end of the lake. Morgan, representing both the USGS...
  • HOW IMPACTS CAN TRIGGER VOLCANOS

    02/04/2003 9:54:17 PM PST · by Mike Darancette · 3 replies · 517+ views
    Space.com ^ | 4 February 2003 | Robert Roy Britt
    HOW IMPACTS CAN TRIGGER VOLCANOS Large asteroid impacts have nasty side effects, as any dinosaur could have told you were she not obliterated by one of these calamity combos 65 million years ago. The ground shakes. Fire arcs across the sky and beyond the horizon. Clouds of debris race around the planet and blot the Sun out for months. At least that's what theory tells us. he scenario has never played out in modern times, scientists don't really know exactly what will happen when the next space rock slams into Earth. One long-supposed incendiary side-effect is enhanced volcanic activity, which...
  • Earth's Volcanism Linked To Meteorite Impacts

    12/13/2002 8:36:39 AM PST · by blam · 34 replies · 1,459+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 12-13-2002 | Kate Ravilious
    Earth's volcanism linked to meteorite impacts 14:31 13 December 02 Exclusive from New Scientist Print EditionSpace rocks are blamed for violent eruptions (Image: GETTY) Large meteorite impacts may not just throw up huge dust clouds but also punch right through the Earth's crust, triggering gigantic volcanic eruptions. The idea is controversial, but evidence is mounting that the Earth's geology has largely been driven by such events. This would also explain why our planet has so few impact crater remnants. Counting the number of asteroids we see in the sky suggests that over the past 250 million years, Earth should have...