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Keyword: warrantlesssearch

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  • Northern Idaho Woman Sues Over Warantless Search

    12/11/2013 10:01:38 AM PST · by Altariel · 31 replies
    AP Yahoo! ^ | December 9, 2013 | Rebecca Boone
    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A woman has sued the city of Post Falls and police officials after her northern Idaho home was searched without a warrant. In a lawsuit filed against the city, Police Chief Scot Haug, and several police officers in Coeur d'Alene's U.S. District Court last week, Melissa A. Miller contends she sustained physical injuries, emotional pain, lost wages and other damages because of the search.
  • 11-Yr-Old Suspended From School For Merely TALKING About Guns (Calvert County, Md)

    06/04/2013 9:09:52 PM PDT · by SWAMPSNIPER · 113 replies
    WMAL ^ | JUNE 03, 2013 | WMAL
    "The boy was questioned by the principal and a sheriff's deputy, who also wanted to search the family home without a warrant, Henkelman said. "He started asking me questions about if I have firearms, and [the deputy said] he's going to have to search my house. Search my house? I just wanted to know what happened."
  • Big Brother Is Watching You

    05/25/2011 8:43:55 PM PDT · by The Magical Mischief Tour · 20 replies
    Reason Magazine ^ | 05/25/2011 | A. Barton Hinkle
    In 1991, George Holliday filmed the LAPD’s arrest and beating of Rodney King. The videotape provoked national controversy. If a similar incident happened today, it might provoke something else: the arrest of George Holliday. Cell phones and cameras with video-recording capability have become ubiquitous. This has led to an increase in the filming of police officers, which has led to a backlash: Cops have begun arresting those who film them, on charges such as interfering with an investigation—even when the filmer is not interfering and the officer is not investigating. In one now-famous example, motorcyclist Anthony Graber’s helmet cam was...
  • (FBI)Tracking Device Teardown

    05/09/2011 4:24:38 PM PDT · by Smogger · 24 replies
    iFixit ^ | 5/9/2011 | iFixit staff
    We partnered with Wired to bring you a peek inside an FBI car-tracking device. The device is similar to the one Yasir Afifi found underneath his car. If you're curious where this one came from, Wired has posted a writeup about Karen Thomas, the woman who found this tracker under her car. They've also posted a video of Kyle doing the teardown. The device comprises of a GPS unit for receiving the car's position, an RF transmitter for relaying your location to the interested authority (aka the FBI), and a set of sweet D-cell batteries that power the whole enchilada....
  • Oregon: "GPS And Taxes..."

    11/13/2008 6:31:24 AM PST · by chrislind2 · 22 replies · 1,248+ views
    The Washington Dispatch ^ | Jul 18, 2003 | Cathryn Crawford
    GPS And Taxes: An Intrusive Combination The Washington Dispatch ^ | July 18, 2003 | Cathryn Crawford Posted on Friday, July 18, 2003 7:07:28 AM by Cathryn Crawford GPS And Taxes: An Intrusive Combination by Cathryn Crawford Jul 18, 2003 Some things just aren’t that shocking anymore. Oregon, the state known for its law that fines you for speaking out against a public worker or a state official, has a new socialistic program in mind. It’s a dream come true for the government, both state and federal, in that it not only promotes the idea of Big Brother, but it...
  • N.C. looks at taxing drivers by the mile [using GPS!]

    12/15/2008 2:26:11 PM PST · by southernnorthcarolina · 57 replies · 1,490+ views
    Charlotte Observer ^ | December 15, 2008 | Steve Harrison
    Idea for road-use tax is expected to hinge on odometer readings, then GPS tracking, to replace revenue lost to fuel efficiency. With gas-tax revenues plummeting, the state of North Carolina is looking seriously at taxing motorists for how far they drive. If the “road-use tax” is implemented, it would at first be simple – with the state checking your odometer annually and taxing you based on how many miles you have driven. But transportation experts say new GPS technology could allow the state to charge people different rates based on when and where they drive, in an attempt to manage...
  • Nanny State alert: Meet the mileage police

    12/16/2008 5:06:20 PM PST · by Sammy67 · 31 replies · 1,110+ views
    michellemalkin ^ | 12/16/08 | michellemalkin
    First, they hand us our Obama-approved tire gauges. Next, they police our odometers. Fresh from North Carolina, here’s the latest Nanny State proposal: Monitoring our odometers and taxing us accordingly. With gas-tax revenues plummeting, the state of North Carolina is looking seriously at taxing motorists for how far they drive. If the “road-use tax” is implemented, it would at first be simple – with the state checking your odometer annually and taxing you based on how many miles you have driven. But transportation experts say new GPS technology could allow the state to
  • Oregon Looks to Legislate GPS Mileage Tax, Faces Privacy Fears

    12/31/2008 12:34:02 PM PST · by hreardon · 123 replies · 2,553+ views
    DailyTech ^ | December 31, 2008 | Jason Mick
    While the exact details are still being ironed out, Gov. Kulongoski's web page gives the basics of the plan. In it he states, "As Oregonians drive less and demand more fuel-efficient vehicles, it is increasingly important that the state find a new way, other than the gas tax, to finance our transportation system." He is creating a task force "to partner with auto manufacturers to refine technology that would enable Oregonians to pay for the transportation system based on how many miles they drive." Key studies were performed in 2006 and 2007 that indicate that such a program would indeed...
  • Feds push for tracking cell phones

    02/11/2010 8:58:30 AM PST · by Cheap_Hessian · 91 replies · 2,580+ views
    CNET News ^ | February 1, 2010 | Declan McCullagh
    Two years ago, when the FBI was stymied by a band of armed robbers known as the "Scarecrow Bandits" that had robbed more than 20 Texas banks, it came up with a novel method of locating the thieves. FBI agents obtained logs from mobile phone companies corresponding to what their cellular towers had recorded at the time of a dozen different bank robberies in the Dallas area. The voluminous records showed that two phones had made calls around the time of all 12 heists, and that those phones belonged to men named Tony Hewitt and Corey Duffey. A jury eventually...
  • Split Panel Affirms Warrantless Use of GPS Device

    06/08/2008 9:15:08 PM PDT · by BloodOrFreedom · 29 replies · 173+ views
    New York Law Journal ^ | June 9, 2008 | Joel Stashenko
    The warrantless use of a global positioning device on a vehicle by police does not violate a driver's right to privacy under either the U.S. Constitution or the New York state Constitution, an upstate appeals panel decided last week. In becoming what it said was the first state appeals court in New York to address the issue, the Appellate Division, 3rd Department, panel determined that the privacy expectations of individuals under both the federal and state constitutions are lower when they are in their automobiles than when they are in their homes. "Because we recognize the diminished expectation of privacy...
  • Police Turn to Secret Weapon: GPS Device

    08/14/2008 1:29:55 AM PDT · by Schnucki · 33 replies · 455+ views
    WP ^ | August 13, 2008 | Ben Hubbard
    Someone was attacking women in Fairfax County and Alexandria, grabbing them from behind and sometimes punching and molesting them before running away. After logging 11 cases in six months, police finally identified a suspect. David Lee Foltz Jr., who had served 17 years in prison for rape, lived near the crime scenes. To figure out if Foltz was the assailant, police pulled out their secret weapon: They put a Global Positioning System device on Foltz's van, which allowed them to track his movements. Police said they soon caught Foltz dragging a woman into a wooded area in Falls Church. After...
  • Police Turn to Secret Weapon: GPS Device

    08/17/2008 8:54:24 AM PDT · by Eric Blair 2084 · 76 replies · 465+ views
    Washington Post ^ | August 13, 2008 | Ben Hubbard
    Someone was attacking women in Fairfax County and Alexandria, grabbing them from behind and sometimes punching and molesting them before running away. After logging 11 cases in six months, police finally identified a suspect. David Lee Foltz Jr., who had served 17 years in prison for rape, lived near the crime scenes. To figure out if Foltz was the assailant, police pulled out their secret weapon: They put a Global Positioning System device on Foltz's van, which allowed them to track his movements. Police said they soon caught Foltz dragging a woman into a wooded area in Falls Church. After...
  • Taxing the Miles You Drive. GPS to Track and Record All Vehicles?

    02/02/2009 9:41:42 AM PST · by stillafreemind · 83 replies · 3,233+ views
    Associated Content ^ | 2-2-09 | Bobby Tall Horse
    Gas prices were too high and we weren't green enough. Fine, buy an electric car or gas saving car and all is fine. Right? Wrong. The Oregon Governor thinks gas taxes are going away. His answer? Tax the miles you drive. Tax the miles you drive with GPS technology. Think they are kidding? They're not.
  • Pawlenty wants Minnesota to test mileage tax

    03/20/2009 3:35:28 PM PDT · by WOBBLY BOB · 63 replies · 1,457+ views
    MPR ^ | 3-18-09 | tim nelson
    State officials say Minnesota is working on a pilot program to test the idea of charging drivers for each mile they drive. Other states around the country are considering a vehicle mileage tax, as revenues from the gas tax are expected to decline.
  • Massachusetts May Consider A Mileage Charge

    02/17/2009 11:10:18 AM PST · by Steelfish · 59 replies · 1,582+ views
    SFChronicle ^ | February 17, 2009
    Massachusetts may consider a mileage charge By GLEN JOHNSON, Associated Press Writer Tuesday, February 17, 2009 A tentative plan to overhaul Massachusetts' transportation system by using GPS chips to charge motorists a quarter-cent for every mile behind the wheel has angered some drivers. "It's outrageous, it's kind of Orwellian, Big Brotherish," said Sen. Scott Brown, R-Wrentham, who drafted legislation last week to prohibit the practice. "You'd need a whole new department of cronies just to keep track of it." But a "Vehicle Miles Traveled" program like the one the governor may unveil this week has already been tested — with...
  • Big Brother watching? Coming soon

    03/31/2009 1:33:50 PM PDT · by Corky Boyd · 6 replies · 472+ views
    Island Turtle ^ | March 31, 2009 | Corky Boyd
    There is a slow but steady encroachment on our privacy by government. It often comes with rational and admirable cover terms for a hidden agenda. A recent comment by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, during his conformation hearings, broached the subject of taxing car mileage based on GPS tracking. An immediate hue and cry went up from privacy organizations which saw it as an Orwellian intrusion. It was dropped like a hot potato by the White House. The EU is currently looking at another
  • Police use of GPS tracking of suspects faces court challenge

    04/06/2009 8:14:22 AM PDT · by Graybeard58 · 44 replies · 886+ views
    Waterbury Republican-American ^ | April 6, 2009 | Editorial
    WATERBURY — Although they don't often advertise the fact, police are using GPS tracking devices to keep tabs on suspects by attaching the gadgets to their cars. But that clandestine technique is under fire. Civil liberties advocates are challenging a New York court ruling that police aren't required to obtain court warrants before they secretly affix the devices to cars. Six nonprofit associations, including the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, are appealing that decision, the outcome of which is expected to set a precedent for privacy rights. GPS tracking devices are inexpensive and take less than a minute to...
  • Obama and ACORN GPS Marking EVERY Front Door in America?

    04/29/2009 10:59:15 AM PDT · by Victory111 · 11 replies · 945+ views
    Cross Action News ^ | 4-29-09 | JB Williams
    Republican Senator Judd Gregg was Obama’s first choice for the Secretary of Commerce post, and Gregg was actually considering joining the Obama team, until he found out that control of the US Census was being stripped from the Commerce Department and placed under the direct control of White House Chief of Staff, Rahm Emanuel. Then, the same week that Americans learned that they were “domestic terrorists” – at least according to Obama’s new DHS (Department of Homeland Security), – if they own a bible, a pocket Constitution or guns, and still believe in Life, Liberty and Freedom, - they also...
  • Obama and ACORN GPS Marking EVERY Front Door in America?

    04/29/2009 11:05:18 AM PDT · by EternalVigilance · 465 replies · 22,367+ views
    America's Independent Party ^ | 4-29-2009 | JB Williams
    Republican Senator Judd Gregg was Obama’s first choice for the Secretary of Commerce post, and Gregg was actually considering joining the Obama team, until he found out that control of the US Census was being stripped from the Commerce Department and placed under the direct control of White House Chief of Staff, Rahm Emanuel. Then, the same week that Americans learned that they were “domestic terrorists” -- at least according to Obama’s new DHS (Department of Homeland Security), -- if they own a bible, a pocket Constitution or guns, and still believe in Life, Liberty and Freedom, - they also...
  • ACORN, now 5 Billion richer is starting to record the GPS Coordinates of every front door in America

    05/02/2009 8:56:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 48 replies · 2,329+ views
    RepubX ^ | May 1, 2009
    Well, now we know why ACORN got 5 Billion$ from CommuPorkulus I and why the White House took control of the US Census Bureau. A perfect excuse to start tagging homes in America for the next Census scheduled for 2010, though it directly violates Sec. 223, Title 13, U.S. Code, Chapter 7, Subtitle 2 which provides the Fed NO authority to GPS paint your front door. It is in direct violation of the Constitution and no one is doing anything to stop it (surprised? They allowed 5.2 Trillion in new spending). ACORN signed on as a national partner with the...
  • Obama and ACORN GPS Marking EVERY Front Door in America? (WHY??)

    05/04/2009 4:23:50 PM PDT · by blueyon · 71 replies · 3,490+ views
    crossactionnews ^ | April 29, 2009 | JB Williams
    According to one of the Census workers, who spoke with me on condition of anonymity, they must GPS mark the coordinates “within 40 ft of every front door” in America and they are supposed to complete that mission nation wide, within 90 days, by the end of July 2009.
  • LIFE WITH BIG BROTHER: Census GPS-tagging your home's front door

    05/05/2009 11:34:00 PM PDT · by Creme Brulee · 73 replies · 2,980+ views
    WorldNetDaily.com ^ | May 5, 2009 | Bob Unruh
    Coordinates being taken for every residence in nation According to an online Yahoo program, the Global Position System coordinates for the White House, probably one of the best-known publicly-owned buildings in the world, are 38.898590 Latitude and -77.035971 Longitude. And since you know that, it's no big deal for the White House to know the coordinates for your front door, is it? Some people think it is, and are upset over an army of some 140,000 workers hired in part with a $700 million taxpayer-funded contract to collect those GPS readings for every front door in the nation.Census GPS-tagging your...
  • GPS Marking EVERY Front Door - Part II (A United Nations Mandate?)

    05/08/2009 5:51:32 AM PDT · by PlainOleAmerican · 84 replies · 4,220+ views
    Canada Free Press ^ | May 7, 2009 | JB Williams
    On April 29, 2009, I released Part I of this column, which resulted in a firestorm of interest in the story behind current Census Bureau efforts to capture and record the GPS coordinates of every private residence in the United States. World Net Daily is leading with that story today… Census GPS-tagging your home’s front door. The story blasted around the Internet within hours of its release, drawing millions of readers and thousands of comments from both Obama and ACORN supporters, and Americans already fearful of a corrupt and possibly unconstitutional government, clearly running wild with unbridled power. By 24...
  • Census GPS-tagging your home's front door

    05/06/2009 7:04:28 AM PDT · by ksgippergirl · 129 replies · 6,301+ views
    World Net Daily ^ | May 5, 2009 | Bob Unruh
    According to an online Yahoo program, the Global Position System coordinates for the White House, probably one of the best-known publicly-owned buildings in the world, are 38.898590 Latitude and -77.035971 Longitude. And since you know that, it's no big deal for the White House to know the coordinates for your front door, is it?
  • GPS tracking on your front door by Census workers

    05/15/2009 9:33:25 PM PDT · by jorjalex · 21 replies · 1,796+ views
    American Daily Review ^ | April 27.2009 | Douglas V. Gibbs
    http://www.americandailyreview.com/home-features-articles-blog/2009/4/27/big-brother-gps-doorway-census.html Big Brother is watching you via the U.S. Census Bureau shooting GPS coordinates of your doorway The Decennial Census in 2010 is around the corner, and technology promises to be of great assistance to the process of counting the number of Americans residing in this great nation. Instead of using paper-based lists, surveys, and the like, however, the United States Government has developed a paperless method to achieve their census goals. Efficiency and accuracy are the promised bi-products of these new technology-based programs, which includes creating Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates for the front doors of American homes. This...
  • Surveillance Shocker: Sprint Received 8 MILLION Law Enf. Requests for GPS Location Data in Past Year

    12/01/2009 3:24:41 PM PST · by Heartlander2 · 72 replies · 2,916+ views
    Electronic Frontier Foundation ^ | December 1, 2009 | Kevin Bankston
    This October, Chris Soghoian — computer security researcher, oft-times journalist, and current technical consultant for the FTC's privacy protection office — attended a closed-door conference called "ISS World". ISS World — the "ISS" is for "Intelligence Support Systems for Lawful Interception, Criminal Investigations and Intelligence Gathering" — is where law enforcement and intelligence agencies consult with telco representatives and surveillance equipment manufacturers about the state of electronic surveillance technology and practice. Armed with a tape recorder, Soghoian went to the conference looking for information about the scope of the government's surveillance practices in the US. What Soghoian uncovered, as he...
  • New RFID Chip Allows Government To Exterminate You At Will

    06/16/2010 8:47:17 PM PDT · by Whenifhow · 16 replies · 708+ views
    Intel Hub ^ | 6-16-2010 | Shepard Ambellas And Alex Thomas
    Some of this information has been readily available but in light of the Gulf Coast situation, this information is more important than ever. In the event of disaster or evacuation, the government might feel the need to track people in order to make sure that they are “safe.” At least that’s what Radiant RFID has in mind with its newest technology. Radiant RFID has even ran beta tests on real-time disasters such as hurricanes Gustav and Ike. This system uses combined RFID and GPS technology to track and trace equipment and personnel. Here is an excerpt from the RFID Journal,...
  • The Government's New Right to Track Your Every Move With GPS

    08/25/2010 9:54:38 AM PDT · by Dr. Marten · 7 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 08.25.2010 | ADAM COHEN
    Government agents can sneak onto your property in the middle of the night, put a GPS device on the bottom of your car and keep track of everywhere you go. This doesn't violate your Fourth Amendment rights, because you do not have any reasonable expectation of privacy in your own driveway - and no reasonable expectation that the government isn't tracking your movements.
  • GPS linked smartphones stop burglary crime spree

    08/25/2010 9:42:14 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 11 replies · 1+ views
    hconline ^ | 8-18-10 | James Ridgeway, Jr
    On Aug. 13, three men entered and burglarized a Bridgeview home in Northwest Houston. The residents of the house, Windi Youngblood, Corey Phelps, and baby daughter, slept undisturbed through the night. Suspects Jason Hamlin, Justin Hamlin, and Zachary Mckinzie, were caught by Precinct 4 constables less than 8 hours later. The constables found the suspects through an odd turn of events. The three men had been broadcasting their GPS coordinates the whole time. Phelps and Youngblood use a feature on their smartphones that link each phone to the other. “We started using this feature to help keep up with the...
  • Virginia court upholds GPS tracking of suspect's vehicle

    09/10/2010 7:44:32 AM PDT · by Libloather · 25 replies
    Va. court upholds GPS tracking of suspect's vehicleBy THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Published: September 09, 2010 Richmond, Va. - The same GPS technology that motorists use to get directions can be used by police without a warrant to track the movements of criminal suspects on public streets, the Virginia Court of Appeals said yesterday. In a case that prompted warnings of Orwellian snooping by the government, the court unanimously ruled that Fairfax County police did nothing wrong when they planted a GPS device on the bumper of a registered sex offender's work van without obtaining a warrant. Police were investigating sexual...
  • FBI Spies on Student, Retrieves GPS Device

    10/08/2010 5:52:54 PM PDT · by Cindy · 30 replies
    CBS NEWS.com ^ | October 8, 2010 6:17 PM | n/a
    PHOTO CAPTION: "Yasir Afifi said the FBI planted a GPS device on his car and later confiscated it when a friend posted this photo online. (Credit: khaledthegypsy/REDDIT)" SNIPPET: "Yasir Afifi, a 20-year-old student and U.S.-born citizen found a GPS tracking device on his car. A friend posted pictures of the device, which resulted in the FBI coming by Afifi's Santa Clara, Calif., apartment to retrieve the surveillance equipment. It seems the FBI was tracking Afifi's movements..."
  • Simple Tips To Protect Yourself From ‘Geo-Stalking’

    03/01/2011 4:01:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    CBS) ^ | March 1, 2011 1:29 PM
    Through a combination of Web technologies and cheaper, more ubiquitous devices, we are now witnessing what could be the golden era of geo-stalking. Certainly, having a GPS inside your phone is convenient. But, because of GPS data embedded in pictures taken with cell phones, those pictures may also share information with strangers that allows them to track you all the way to your front door. For more information on how to protect your information and turn off your GPS photo function....
  • Massachusetts Legislature Considering Putting GPS Locators In Firearms

    03/05/2011 8:54:06 AM PST · by Sasparilla · 22 replies
    armedselfdefense.blogspot.com ^ | 03/05/11 | Gun Nut
    Last Thursday, 03/03/11, we reported that there is a bill under consideration in the Connecticut legislature that would require confiscation of all magazines with a capacity of over ten rounds that remain in the state 90 days after the bill becomes law, if it does. Now, the geniuses in Massachusetts are proposing going Connecticut one better. Its a state commission to study the feasibility of requiring Global Positioning Systems (GPS) locators in firearms. Here is the bill:
  • Judge rules use of GPS to track a cheating spouse is not an invasion of privacy

    07/08/2011 9:16:35 PM PDT · by Huntress · 62 replies
    Star-Ledger ^ | 7/7/11 | Mary Ann Spoto
    GLOUCESTER COUNTY — Beware, all you cheating husbands and wives. The use of a GPS device to track your whereabouts is not an invasion of privacy in New Jersey, a state appellate court panel ruled today. Based on the battle of a divorcing Gloucester County couple, the decision helps clarify the rules governing a technology increasingly employed by suspicious spouses — many of whom hire private investigators. “For the appellate division to say that it’s not an invasion of privacy is a wonderful thing for the private investigation business,” said Lisa Reed, owner of LSR Investigations in Flemington. “It’s been...
  • Stalking the Secret Patriot Act (GPS location tracking)

    09/28/2011 6:20:35 AM PDT · by Texas Fossil · 10 replies
    Cato Institute ^ | September 27, 2011 @ 5:05 pm | Julian Sanchez
    Since this spring’s blink-and-you-missed-it debate over reauthorization of several controversial provisions of the Patriot Act, Senators Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Mark Udall (D-CO) have been complaining to anyone who’d listen about a “Secret Patriot Act“—an interpretation of one of the law’s provisions by the classified Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court granting surveillance powers exceeding those an ordinary person would understand to be conferred from the text of the statute itself. As I argued at the time, there is an enormous amount of strong circumstantial evidence suggesting that this referred to a “sensitive collection program” involving cell phone location tracking—potentially on a...
  • Supremes Deciding How Close Government Can Watch You

    10/07/2011 8:41:55 PM PDT · by Iam1ru1-2 · 20 replies
    wnd.com ^ | Bob Unruh
    <p>The Obama administration says that it has the right to attach a GPS unit to your vehicle and watch where you go, with whom you meet, where your children visit friends, whether you go to church or a bar or a bank – all in the hope that investigators could develop the "probable cause" they would need to get a formal court order to search you and your possessions.</p>
  • Supreme Court GPS Ruling: "Dramatic Ramifications" for Gun Owners

    01/25/2012 10:54:32 AM PST · by marktwain · 13 replies
    opposingviews.com ^ | 24 January, 2012 | GOA
    The Supreme Court yesterday unanimously sided with Gun Owners of America in finding that the placement of a Global Positioning Device on an automobile constitutes a “search” for purposes of the Fourth Amendment. The majority opinion in U.S. v. Jones was written by Justice Antonin Scalia and follows GOA’s reasoning to throw out the “reasonable expectation of privacy” test which has been thought to be the dominant Fourth Amendment standard in recent years. The Obama Administration argued that because the police could theoretically follow Antoine Jones’ car, he had no “reasonable expectation of privacy,” and thus, placing a GPS device...
  • Prosecutors: Man who robbed Radio Shack tracked down using GPS he stole

    04/08/2012 7:06:52 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 41 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | April 8, 2012 | Dan Hinkel
    A Chicago man robbed a Radio Shack of $17,000 in merchandise, but police tracked him down quickly thanks to the global positioning equipment he stole, prosecutors said.
  • What You May Not Know About License Plate And Cell Phone Tracking

    07/30/2012 2:26:55 PM PDT · by ExxonPatrolUs · 9 replies
    ACLU ^ | 7-30-2012 | Kade Crockford, ACLU of Massachusetts
    Today the ACLU is launching a nationwide effort to find out more about automatic license plate readers (ALPR). By snapping photographs of each license plate they encounter—up to three thousand per minute—and retaining records of who was where when, license plate readers are fundamentally threatening our freedom on the open road. You may have seen the recent New York Times op-ed that admonished us to start referring to our mobile devices as “trackers” instead of “phones.” Perhaps as ALPR technology spreads we should start saying “tracker” in place of “car,” too. We need statutory protections to limit the collection, retention,...
  • Feds push for tracking cell phones

    02/12/2010 6:29:50 AM PST · by marktwain · 20 replies · 663+ views
    CNET ^ | 11 February, 2010 | Declan McCullagh
    Two years ago, when the FBI was stymied by a band of armed robbers known as the "Scarecrow Bandits" that had robbed more than 20 Texas banks, it came up with a novel method of locating the thieves. FBI agents obtained logs from mobile phone companies corresponding to what their cellular towers had recorded at the time of a dozen different bank robberies in the Dallas area. The voluminous records showed that two phones had made calls around the time of all 12 heists, and that those phones belonged to men named Tony Hewitt and Corey Duffey. A jury eventually...
  • Eight Area Men Sentenced on Federal Racketeering Charges Involving Conspiracy...

    04/02/2010 3:41:06 AM PDT · by Cindy · 8 replies · 579+ views
    Note: The following text is a quote: Eight Area Men Sentenced on Federal Racketeering Charges Involving Conspiracy to Transfer Cash and Checks to the Palestinian Territories ST. LOUIS, MO—The United States Attorney’s office announced today that eight members of a criminal enterprise operating out of five St. Louis area convenience stores have been sentenced on charges of federal racketeering or related charges. As far back as 2000, the RICO conspiracy has involved bank fraud, receipt of stolen property, conducting an unlicensed money transmitting business, purchasing contraband cigarettes for resale, evading reporting requirement on exporting monetary instruments, and transporting monetary instruments...
  • Saudi inventer of GPS "Killer Chip" denied patent in Germany

    05/17/2009 8:18:21 AM PDT · by NorwegianViking · 48 replies · 1,246+ views
    World Net Daily ^ | May 16, 2009 | Jay Baggett
    By Jay Baggett © 2009 WorldNetDaily You can run, but you cannot hide ... and if you try, one push of a button will cause a lethal poison to immediately begin flowing through your body. That's the Orwellian future a Saudi inventor was seeking to bring to Germany until that nation's patent office announced last week it was rejecting his request to patent what has been dubbed the "Killer Chip." The tiny semiconductor device is intended to be surgically implanted or injected into the body, according to the patent application, for the purpose of tracking visitors from other nations by...
  • Justices Rein In Police on GPS Trackers (Supreme Court)

    01/24/2012 9:34:32 AM PST · by marktwain · 7 replies · 1+ views
    online.wsj.com ^ | 24 January, 2012 | JESS BRAVIN
    WASHINGTON—The Supreme Court ruled Monday that police violated the Constitution when they attached a Global Positioning System tracker to a suspect's vehicle without a valid search warrant, voting unanimously in one of the first major cases to test privacy rights in the digital era. The decision offered a glimpse of how the court may address the flood of privacy cases expected in coming years over issues such as cellphones, email and online documents. But the justices split 5-4 over the reasoning, suggesting that differences remain over how to apply age-old principles prohibiting "unreasonable searches." The minority pushed for a more...
  • How to Stop the Government From Tracking Your Location (Illegally!)

    08/29/2010 3:28:46 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 56 replies · 2+ views
    Gizmodo ^ | 26 August, 2010 | Jason Chen
    The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals just decided that it was legal for the police to put a GPS tracking device on your car, sitting in your driveway, on your property. Here's how to protect yourself.Matt's post about the decision explains in depth about the ruling. To quickly summarize, the supreme court had said before that police can look through things that anyone in the public could come across, meaning, your driveway is freely accessible to the public, hence, the cops can look through it. The 9th circuit court now says that cops can shove a GPS locator onto your car, because the area is publicly...
  • Oil change reignites debate over GPS trackers

    10/17/2010 12:24:32 AM PDT · by jerry557 · 42 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 10/16/10 | Paul Elias
    SAN FRANCISCO – Yasir Afifi, a 20-year-old computer salesman and community college student, took his car in for an oil change earlier this month and his mechanic spotted an odd wire hanging from the undercarriage. The wire was attached to a strange magnetic device that puzzled Afifi and the mechanic. They freed it from the car and posted images of it online, asking for help in identifying it. Two days later, FBI agents arrived at Afifi's Santa Clara apartment and demanded the return of their property — a global positioning system tracking device now at the center of a raging...
  • Gov. Can Now Track Your Phones Without Warrant

    09/08/2010 12:45:06 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies
    Tom's Guide ^ | September 8, 2010 | Kevin Parrish
    A new ruling says that--in most cases--government and law agencies don't need a search warrant to track cell phones.Tuesday a federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled that--in most cases--the FBI and other police agencies do not need a search warrant in order to track the location of cell phones used by Americans. The three-judge panel of the Third Circuit sided with the Obama Administration (pdf) in the belief that a signed search warrant--one based on a probable cause to suspect criminal activity--isn't necessary when obtaining logs from wireless carriers that depict the whereabouts of a cell phone. However the panel...
  • Supreme Court Hears Whether GPS Counts as 'Big Brother'

    11/09/2011 5:56:07 AM PST · by Ratman83 · 64 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/08/11 | Shannon Bream
    WASHINGTON – Citizens traveling public highways should have no expectation of privacy just because police are tracking their movements through GPS rather than in person, the U.S. government argued Tuesday in a case before the Supreme Court that pits the interest of law enforcement against individual privacy rights. The dispute springs from a situation in which police affixed a GPS tracking device to a suspect's car without a proper warrant. It monitored the suspect's movements for several weeks, noting where his vehicle went and how long it stayed at each location. While much of the data was ultimately excluded as...
  • Ohio Appeals Court Strikes Down GPS Vehicle Spying

    10/02/2011 4:40:14 PM PDT · by Ken H · 22 replies
    the Newspaper.com ^ | 09/30/2011 | n/a
    Fifth District Ohio Appeals Court ruling meant to influence higher courts against allowing warrantless GPS vehicle tracking. Although the US Supreme Court is expected to settle the issue of GPS tracking of motorists soon, a three-judge panel of the Ohio Court of Appeals, Fifth District ruled 2-1 earlier this month against the warrantless use of the technology. The majority's decision was likely designed to influence the deliberations of the higher courts. On November 8, the US Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the GPS case US v. Jones. The Ohio Supreme Court is also considering Ohio v. Johnson in...
  • (Supreme) Court Case Asks if ‘Big Brother’ Is Spelled GPS

    09/12/2011 6:10:39 AM PDT · by Libloather · 24 replies
    NY Times ^ | 9/10/11 | ADAM LIPTAK
    Court Case Asks if ‘Big Brother’ Is Spelled GPSBy ADAM LIPTAK Published: September 10, 2011 WASHINGTON — The precedent is novel. More precisely, the precedent is a novel. In a series of rulings on the use of satellites and cellphones to track criminal suspects, judges around the country have been citing George Orwell’s “1984” to sound an alarm. They say the Fourth Amendment’s promise of protection from government invasion of privacy is in danger of being replaced by the futuristic surveillance state Orwell described. **SNIP** Last month, Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis of the Federal District Court in Brooklyn turned down...
  • The police can attach a GPS to your car without a warrant [WI]

    05/10/2009 1:37:42 PM PDT · by clyde_m · 40 replies · 2,587+ views
    The Patriot Room ^ | May 10, 2009 | Clyde Middleton
    It seems that the police, at least in Wisconsin, can attach a GPS tracking device to a car for any reason or no reason at all. No warrant or any level of suspicion is required. The case does not appear to be erroneously decided, and should withstand further review. It’s time for the captains of industry to develop a reasonably priced product that can disable such devices attached to cars.