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Keyword: wiltshire

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  • Under English Garden, 'Unparalleled' Remains of Roman Villa

    04/20/2016 10:39:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    New York Times ^ | April 17, 2016 | Steven Erlanger
    The geraniums grew in an oblong stone vessel, and no one ever thought much about it. But when Luke Irwin, a rug designer in the county of Wiltshire, England, hired workmen to lay electric cables under his yard, so that his son could have light in a barn when the family played table tennis, they uncovered an intricate mosaic floor of red, blue and white tiles only 18 inches down. Mr. Irwin called the local council, which sent archaeologists who discovered the remains of a lavish Roman villa under his extensive yard, and told him that the flowers were growing...
  • The world’s first detailed prehistoric maps of Britain

    12/19/2013 5:05:23 PM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 12-8-2013 | TANN
    The ABC Publishing Group has announced the publication of the world’s first prehistoric maps of Britain. These maps are based on the recently published book by Robert John Langdon titled ‘The Stonehenge Enigma’ which proves that Britain suffered massive ‘Post Glacial Flooding’ directly after the last Ice Age ten thousand years ago, and that mankind placed their ancient sites on the shorelines of these raised waterways. Stonehenge - surrounded by water on three sides[Credit: ABC Publishing Group] The maps are presented on the old ordnance survey first edition that shows the natural ancient environment to a higher degree of detail...
  • Sum Gai: War memorial to be left blank for fear of mis

    11/07/2015 4:50:51 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 34 replies
    A new war memorial will have no names inscribed on it in case errors are included. The new installation will commemorate 40 soldiers from Tidworth, Wiltshire, who have died in battle since 1914. Chris Franklin, town mayor, said the memorial committee's decision to "omit the names" seemed to be "purely based on it being too much of a risk".
  • Stonehenge II is found! Radar search reveals giant line of standing stones from 4,500 years ago

    09/07/2015 8:19:35 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 54 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Published: 18:01 EST, 6 September 2015 | Colin Fernandez
    <p>For centuries Stonehenge has mystified and enraptured archaeologists and visitors.</p> <p>So maybe it is not surprising that another monumental wonder from prehistory has been overlooked for so long – even though it is just a mile away.</p> <p>Experts have discovered an 'extraordinary' line of giant stones that dates back more than 4,500 years.</p>
  • Avebury Stone Is Found to Rival Stonehenge

    04/18/2003 3:42:48 AM PDT · by SteveH · 9 replies · 343+ views
    Avebury Stone Is Found to Rival Stonehenge By Stuart Coles, PA News Archaeologists working at the ancient Avebury stone circle have been surprised to uncover what could be one of the largest standing stones in the country. Experts at English Heritage and the National Trust say the stone could weigh in at 100 tons, rivalling the largest megaliths at its fellow site in Wiltshire, Stonehenge. The surprise discovery was made during work at the 4,500 year-old stone circle to straighten two stones known as the Cove, which have begun to lean over the last 300 years and which it was...
  • Buried Megaliths Discovered At Stone Circle Site (Avebury)

    12/02/2003 5:34:50 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 1,157+ views
    Ananova ^ | 12-2-2003
    Buried megaliths discovered at stone circle site Archaeologists have discovered an arc of buried megaliths that once formed part of the great stone circle at Avebury in Wiltshire. The National Trust says the existence of these enormous stones, originally constructed more than 4,500 years ago, has remained a puzzle for the last 300 years. Visitors to Avebury will see most of the standing megaliths in the western half of the stone circle. The famous map of Avebury drawn up by William Stukely in the 1720s showed that many of the stones in the south east and north east quadrants of...
  • Archeologists Find U.S. Army Bacon and Sunscreen Buried at Salisbury Plain

    07/05/2015 10:13:26 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    UPI ^ | July 5, 2015 | Fred Lambert
    Wessex Archeology says it has in recent years found remains from World War II mess kitchens in the area.Archeologists say they have unearthed several tins filled with U.S. Army bacon and sunscreen at Salisbury Plain, England, home of the famous Stonehenge ruins. Wessex Archeology shared the find on its website in celebration of American Independence Day. Salisbury Plain has been a British military training ground since the early 20th century, but U.S. military forces staged there in preparation for the 1944 invasion of Nazi-occupied France during World War II. "The military has been on Salisbury Plain for decades so it's...
  • Stonehenge Built With Balls? New experiment suggests monumental stones could have rolled on rails

    12/30/2010 3:10:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies · 18+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Friday, December 10, 2010 | Kate Ravilious
    It's one of Stonehenge's greatest mysteries: How did Stone Age Britons move 45-ton slabs across dozens of miles to create the 4,500-year-old stone circle? ...A previous theory suggested that the builders used wooden rollers -- carved tree trunks laid side by side on a constructed hard surface. Another imagined huge wooden sleds atop greased wooden rails. But critics say the rollers' hard pathway would have left telltale gouges in the landscape, which have never been found. And the sled system, while plausible, would have required huge amounts of manpower -- hundreds of men at a time to move one of...
  • New Theory On Stonehenge Mystery

    12/03/2004 4:00:41 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies · 1,678+ views
    BBC ^ | 12-3-2004
    New theory on Stonehenge mystery Experts believe the stones may have been levered into place A fresh theory on how Stonehenge was built has been tested out by a group of experts and enthusiasts. Gordon Pipes, of the Stonehengineers group of scientists and archaeologists, has suggested that levers may have been used to move the giant stones. They have tested his "stone-rowing" theory which involves a 45-tonne stone being levered on a track of logs. "It's akin to rowing a boat, weights can be picked up with levers using body mass and balance," said Mr Pipes. Mr Pipes, from Derby,...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Research finds Stonehenge was monument marking unification of Britain

    06/22/2012 3:40:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    U of Sheffield ^ | Friday, June 22, 2012 | Amy Stone
    The teams, from the universities of Sheffield, Manchester, Southampton, Bournemouth and University College London, all working on the Stonehenge Riverside Project (SRP), explored not just Stonehenge and its landscape but also the wider social and economic context of the monument's main stages of construction around 3,000 BC and 2,500 BC... Previous theories have suggested the great stone circle was used as a prehistoric observatory, a sun temple, a place of healing, and a temple of the ancient druids. The Stonehenge Riverside Project's researchers have rejected all these possibilities after the largest programme of archaeological research ever mounted on this iconic...
  • The king of Stonehenge: Were artefacts at ancient chief's burial site Britain's first Crown Jewels?

    05/12/2009 8:57:45 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 69 replies · 3,768+ views
    dailymail ^ | 12th May 2009 | Paul Harris
    He was a giant of a man, a chieftain who ruled with a royal sceptre and a warrior's axe. When they laid him to rest they dressed him in his finest regalia and placed his weapons at his side. Then they turned his face towards the setting sun and sealed him in a burial mound that would keep him safe for the next 4,000 years. In his grave were some of the most exquisitely fashioned artefacts of the Bronze Age, intricately crafted to honour the status of a figure who bore them in life in death. For this may have...
  • Britain's 'most important archeological' discovery found in desk drawer

    10/28/2008 8:13:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 763+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Urmee Khan
    The pinhead-sized studs form an intricate pattern on the handle of a dagger, but archeologists failed to realise their significance when they excavated the burial mound in Wiltshire - known as Bush Barrow - in 1808. Now they are to be re-united with other priceless artefacts unearthed at the site and put on show at the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes after Niall Sharples, a senior lecturer at Cardiff University turned out his predecessors' desk and discovered them in a film canister labelled Bush Barrow. In the 1960s, the gold was taken away for examination by Professor Richard Atkinson, a...
  • University of Reading archaeologists to excavate the biggest henge in the country (Marden Henge)

    06/29/2015 10:03:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Trinity Mirror Southern - UK ^ | June 20, 2015 | Linda Fort
    Archaeologists from the University of Reading will start a three-year excavation on land between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avenbury this summer. Exploring the Vale of Pewsey in Wiltshire is expected to reveal more about the lives of the people who worshipped at Stonehenge. The work will be done in collaboration with Historic England, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Wiltshire Museum. The site is a barely explored archaeological region of huge international importance. The project will investigate Marden Henge. Built around 2400 BC Marden is the largest henge or Neolithic earthwork in the country and one of...
  • Gold Sun Disc from time of Stonehenge revealed to the public

    06/23/2015 11:48:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 19, 2015 | Wiltshire Museum
    Rare Bronze Age gold artifact found in burial mound in Wiltshire, U.K. For the first time, an early Bronze Age sun-disc from Monkton Farleigh in Wiltshire, U.K., is being exhibited for public view at the Wiltshire Museum, in time for this year's summer solstice. It is one of only 6 sun-disc finds and is one of the earliest metal objects found in Britain. Made in about 2,400 BC, soon after the sarsen stones were erected at Stonehenge, it is thought to represent the sun. The sun-disc was initially found in 1947 in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over...
  • UK Gives Muslim Just 7 Years for Day-Long Rape of Vulnerable Woman

    06/03/2015 3:39:06 AM PDT · by markomalley · 15 replies
    Atlas Shrugs ^ | 6/3/15 | Pamela Geller
    “I am pleased with the sentence given out at court and I am hopeful that it will encourage other victims of sexual assault to find the strength to come forward and report offences – justice will be done.”It’s more likely that this weak sentence will only encourage the Muslim rape gangs to brutalize more kaffir girls, knowing that they will get a light sentence at worst and be out and raping again in a few years.Dhimmi Britain is finished. Any nation that would allow this and this to happen to its girls doesn’t even deserve to be saved. “Jailed: Violent...
  • Stonehenge "King" was from central Europe

    02/10/2003 9:48:39 PM PST · by spetznaz · 19 replies · 458+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Mon, Feb 10, 2003
    LONDON (Reuters) - The construction of one of the country's most famous ancient landmarks, the towering megaliths at Stonehenge in southern England, might have been supervised by the Swiss, or maybe even the Germans. Archaeologists studying the remains of a wealthy archer found in a 4,000-year-old grave exhumed near Stonehenge last year said on Monday he was originally from the Alps region, probably modern-day Switzerland, Austria or Germany. "He would have been a very important person in the Stonehenge area and it is fascinating to think that someone from abroad -- probably modern-day Switzerland -- could have played an important...
  • Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge

    08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · by blam · 78 replies · 3,337+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
    Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
  • Tests Reveal Amesbury Archer "King Of Stonehenge' Was A Settler From The Alps

    02/08/2004 12:40:04 PM PST · by blam · 34 replies · 2,101+ views
    Tests reveal Amesbury Archer ‘King of Stonehenge’ was a settler from the Alps The man who may have helped organise the building of Stonehenge was a settler from continental Europe, archaeologists say. The latest tests on the Amesbury Archer, whose grave astonished archaeologists last year with the richness of its contents, show he was originally from the Alps region, probably Switzerland, Austria or Germany. The tests also show that the gold hair tresses found in the grave are the earliest gold objects found in Britain. The grave of the Archer, who lived around 2,300BC, contained about 100 items, more than...
  • Roman Souvenir Of (Hadrian's) Wall Found

    09/30/2003 1:58:50 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 956+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-30-2003
    Roman souvenir of wall found The bronze pan has the names of Roman forts on it A unique Roman "souvenir" of the building of Hadrian's Wall has been discovered. The bronze pan, dating from the second century AD, when the Romans built the dividing wall across the north of England, was found in the Staffordshire moorlands. Archaeologists are excited because the names of four forts located at the western end of Hadrian's Wall - Bowes, Drumburgh, Stanwix and Castlesteads - are engraved on the vessel. The discovery was being made public at the Institute of Archaeology in London by the...