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Keyword: wiltshire

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  • Archeologists Find U.S. Army Bacon and Sunscreen Buried at Salisbury Plain

    07/05/2015 10:13:26 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    UPI ^ | July 5, 2015 | Fred Lambert
    Wessex Archeology says it has in recent years found remains from World War II mess kitchens in the area.Archeologists say they have unearthed several tins filled with U.S. Army bacon and sunscreen at Salisbury Plain, England, home of the famous Stonehenge ruins. Wessex Archeology shared the find on its website in celebration of American Independence Day. Salisbury Plain has been a British military training ground since the early 20th century, but U.S. military forces staged there in preparation for the 1944 invasion of Nazi-occupied France during World War II. "The military has been on Salisbury Plain for decades so it's...
  • Stonehenge Built With Balls? New experiment suggests monumental stones could have rolled on rails

    12/30/2010 3:10:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies · 18+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Friday, December 10, 2010 | Kate Ravilious
    It's one of Stonehenge's greatest mysteries: How did Stone Age Britons move 45-ton slabs across dozens of miles to create the 4,500-year-old stone circle? ...A previous theory suggested that the builders used wooden rollers -- carved tree trunks laid side by side on a constructed hard surface. Another imagined huge wooden sleds atop greased wooden rails. But critics say the rollers' hard pathway would have left telltale gouges in the landscape, which have never been found. And the sled system, while plausible, would have required huge amounts of manpower -- hundreds of men at a time to move one of...
  • New Theory On Stonehenge Mystery

    12/03/2004 4:00:41 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies · 1,678+ views
    BBC ^ | 12-3-2004
    New theory on Stonehenge mystery Experts believe the stones may have been levered into place A fresh theory on how Stonehenge was built has been tested out by a group of experts and enthusiasts. Gordon Pipes, of the Stonehengineers group of scientists and archaeologists, has suggested that levers may have been used to move the giant stones. They have tested his "stone-rowing" theory which involves a 45-tonne stone being levered on a track of logs. "It's akin to rowing a boat, weights can be picked up with levers using body mass and balance," said Mr Pipes. Mr Pipes, from Derby,...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Research finds Stonehenge was monument marking unification of Britain

    06/22/2012 3:40:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    U of Sheffield ^ | Friday, June 22, 2012 | Amy Stone
    The teams, from the universities of Sheffield, Manchester, Southampton, Bournemouth and University College London, all working on the Stonehenge Riverside Project (SRP), explored not just Stonehenge and its landscape but also the wider social and economic context of the monument's main stages of construction around 3,000 BC and 2,500 BC... Previous theories have suggested the great stone circle was used as a prehistoric observatory, a sun temple, a place of healing, and a temple of the ancient druids. The Stonehenge Riverside Project's researchers have rejected all these possibilities after the largest programme of archaeological research ever mounted on this iconic...
  • The king of Stonehenge: Were artefacts at ancient chief's burial site Britain's first Crown Jewels?

    05/12/2009 8:57:45 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 69 replies · 3,768+ views
    dailymail ^ | 12th May 2009 | Paul Harris
    He was a giant of a man, a chieftain who ruled with a royal sceptre and a warrior's axe. When they laid him to rest they dressed him in his finest regalia and placed his weapons at his side. Then they turned his face towards the setting sun and sealed him in a burial mound that would keep him safe for the next 4,000 years. In his grave were some of the most exquisitely fashioned artefacts of the Bronze Age, intricately crafted to honour the status of a figure who bore them in life in death. For this may have...
  • Britain's 'most important archeological' discovery found in desk drawer

    10/28/2008 8:13:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 763+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Urmee Khan
    The pinhead-sized studs form an intricate pattern on the handle of a dagger, but archeologists failed to realise their significance when they excavated the burial mound in Wiltshire - known as Bush Barrow - in 1808. Now they are to be re-united with other priceless artefacts unearthed at the site and put on show at the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes after Niall Sharples, a senior lecturer at Cardiff University turned out his predecessors' desk and discovered them in a film canister labelled Bush Barrow. In the 1960s, the gold was taken away for examination by Professor Richard Atkinson, a...
  • University of Reading archaeologists to excavate the biggest henge in the country (Marden Henge)

    06/29/2015 10:03:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Trinity Mirror Southern - UK ^ | June 20, 2015 | Linda Fort
    Archaeologists from the University of Reading will start a three-year excavation on land between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avenbury this summer. Exploring the Vale of Pewsey in Wiltshire is expected to reveal more about the lives of the people who worshipped at Stonehenge. The work will be done in collaboration with Historic England, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Wiltshire Museum. The site is a barely explored archaeological region of huge international importance. The project will investigate Marden Henge. Built around 2400 BC Marden is the largest henge or Neolithic earthwork in the country and one of...
  • Gold Sun Disc from time of Stonehenge revealed to the public

    06/23/2015 11:48:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 19, 2015 | Wiltshire Museum
    Rare Bronze Age gold artifact found in burial mound in Wiltshire, U.K. For the first time, an early Bronze Age sun-disc from Monkton Farleigh in Wiltshire, U.K., is being exhibited for public view at the Wiltshire Museum, in time for this year's summer solstice. It is one of only 6 sun-disc finds and is one of the earliest metal objects found in Britain. Made in about 2,400 BC, soon after the sarsen stones were erected at Stonehenge, it is thought to represent the sun. The sun-disc was initially found in 1947 in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over...
  • UK Gives Muslim Just 7 Years for Day-Long Rape of Vulnerable Woman

    06/03/2015 3:39:06 AM PDT · by markomalley · 15 replies
    Atlas Shrugs ^ | 6/3/15 | Pamela Geller
    “I am pleased with the sentence given out at court and I am hopeful that it will encourage other victims of sexual assault to find the strength to come forward and report offences – justice will be done.”It’s more likely that this weak sentence will only encourage the Muslim rape gangs to brutalize more kaffir girls, knowing that they will get a light sentence at worst and be out and raping again in a few years.Dhimmi Britain is finished. Any nation that would allow this and this to happen to its girls doesn’t even deserve to be saved. “Jailed: Violent...
  • Stonehenge "King" was from central Europe

    02/10/2003 9:48:39 PM PST · by spetznaz · 19 replies · 458+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Mon, Feb 10, 2003
    LONDON (Reuters) - The construction of one of the country's most famous ancient landmarks, the towering megaliths at Stonehenge in southern England, might have been supervised by the Swiss, or maybe even the Germans. Archaeologists studying the remains of a wealthy archer found in a 4,000-year-old grave exhumed near Stonehenge last year said on Monday he was originally from the Alps region, probably modern-day Switzerland, Austria or Germany. "He would have been a very important person in the Stonehenge area and it is fascinating to think that someone from abroad -- probably modern-day Switzerland -- could have played an important...
  • Unearthed, The Prince Of Stonehenge

    08/25/2002 5:04:48 PM PDT · by blam · 78 replies · 3,337+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 8-26-2002 | Roger Highfield
    Unearthed, the prince of Stonehenge By Roger Highfield (Filed: 21/08/2002) A prehistoric prince with gold ear-rings has been found near Stonehenge a few yards away from the richest early Bronze Age burial in Britain. Earlier this year, archaeologists found an aristocratic warrior, also with gold ear-rings, on Salisbury Plain and speculated that he may have been an ancient king of Stonehenge. The body was laid to rest 4,300 years ago during the construction of the monument, along with stone arrow heads and slate wristguards that protected the arm from the recoil of the bow. Archaeologists named him the Amesbury Archer....
  • Tests Reveal Amesbury Archer "King Of Stonehenge' Was A Settler From The Alps

    02/08/2004 12:40:04 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 2,101+ views
    Tests reveal Amesbury Archer ‘King of Stonehenge’ was a settler from the Alps The man who may have helped organise the building of Stonehenge was a settler from continental Europe, archaeologists say. The latest tests on the Amesbury Archer, whose grave astonished archaeologists last year with the richness of its contents, show he was originally from the Alps region, probably Switzerland, Austria or Germany. The tests also show that the gold hair tresses found in the grave are the earliest gold objects found in Britain. The grave of the Archer, who lived around 2,300BC, contained about 100 items, more than...
  • Roman Souvenir Of (Hadrian's) Wall Found

    09/30/2003 1:58:50 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies · 956+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-30-2003
    Roman souvenir of wall found The bronze pan has the names of Roman forts on it A unique Roman "souvenir" of the building of Hadrian's Wall has been discovered. The bronze pan, dating from the second century AD, when the Romans built the dividing wall across the north of England, was found in the Staffordshire moorlands. Archaeologists are excited because the names of four forts located at the western end of Hadrian's Wall - Bowes, Drumburgh, Stanwix and Castlesteads - are engraved on the vessel. The discovery was being made public at the Institute of Archaeology in London by the...
  • Archaeologists Begin Dig on Buried Stone Circle TEN Times Bigger than Stonehenge

    07/01/2010 5:37:28 PM PDT · by GiovannaNicoletta · 51 replies
    DailyMail.co.uk ^ | 6/30/2010 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Archaeologists have begun a major dig to unearth the hidden mysteries of a buried ancient stone circle site that is ten times bigger than Stonehenge. The enormous 4,000 year old Marden Henge, in Wiltshire, is Britain's largest prehistoric structure stretching for 10.5 hectares, the equivalent of 10 football pitches. English Heritage is carrying out a six-week dig hoping to reveal the secrets behind the giant henge which has baffled historians for centuries.
  • Work Begins To Uncover Secrets Of Silbury Hill

    05/12/2007 10:43:08 AM PDT · by blam · 45 replies · 1,686+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5-12-2007 | Richard Savill
    Work begins to uncover secrets of Silbury Hill By Richard Savill Last Updated: 2:26am BST 12/05/2007 Work began yesterday to save an ancient landmark in Wiltshire from collapsing. Silbury Hill, which at 130 feet high is the largest prehistoric man-made construction in Europe, continues to mystify archaeologists. English Heritage is to spend £600,000 this summer trying to preserve the mound. Specialist engineers will enter the mound through a tunnel which was dug in 1968 by a team led by the archaeologist, Prof Richard Atkinson. That tunnel was the last of three made over two centuries by archaeologists. The original purpose...
  • Last glimpse inside ancient enigma[UK][Silbury Hill]

    01/31/2008 8:31:26 AM PST · by BGHater · 49 replies · 682+ views
    BBC ^ | Stephen Smith
    Silbury Hill remains an enigma despite extensive excavations Inside Silbury Hill You're in your jouncing people-carrier, taking in the agreeable but unremarkable view, and then suddenly it's upon you; a pointy attention-grabber at the side of the road, towering street furniture in the shape of a hazard-warning equilateral. This is crushing historical time expressed in trigonometry.Old Egypt hands could be forgiven for thinking that the terrible shark's fin that I'm talking about is the sort of thing that looms in your windshield as you're driving through the suburbs of Cairo. But they'd be wrong. Or they'd be half-right. Silbury...
  • Marlborough Mound: 'Merlin's burial place' built in 2400 BC

    06/01/2011 12:32:30 PM PDT · by decimon · 47 replies · 1+ views
    BBC ^ | May 31, 2011 | Unknown
    A Wiltshire mound where the legendary wizard Merlin was purported to be buried has been found to date back to 2400 BC.Radiocarbon dating tests were carried out on charcoal samples taken from Marlborough Mound, which lies in Marlborough College's grounds. The 19m (62ft) high mound had previously mystified historians. Some believed it dated back to about 600 AD. English Heritage said: "This is a very exciting time for British prehistory." Dig leader Jim Leary said: "This is an astonishing discovery. "The Marlborough Mound has been one of the biggest mysteries in the Wessex landscape. "For centuries people have wondered whether...
  • Archaeology dating technique uncovers 'property boom' of 3700 BC

    06/07/2011 8:31:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Monday 6 June 2011 | Maev Kennedy
    A new scientific dating technique has revealed there was a building spree more than 5,500 years ago, when many of the most spectacular monuments in the English landscape, such as Maiden Castle in Dorset and Windmill Hill in Wiltshire, were built, used and abandoned in a single lifetime. The fashion for the monuments, hilltops enclosed by rings of ditches, known to archaeologists as causewayed enclosures, instead of being the ritual work of generations as had been believed, began on the continent centuries earlier but spread from Kent to Cornwall within 50 years in about 3700 BC. Alex Bayliss, an archaeologist...
  • Roman villas found under playing field

    08/17/2002 10:13:48 PM PDT · by LostTribe · 51 replies · 1,383+ views
    The London Telegraph ^ | August 18, 2002 | Catherine Milner
    Roman villas found under playing field By Catherine Milner, Arts Correspondent (Filed: 18/08/2002) The remains of two Roman villas have been found under a football pitch in Wiltshire in what is believed to be one of the most significant archaeological discoveries since the early 1960s. The houses, which were built for Roman aristocrats in about 350AD, have 40 rooms each and feature an extensive mosaic which is thought to be one of the biggest and best-preserved Roman examples ever found in Britain. Archaeologists from Bristol and Cardiff universities, who are carrying out the excavation, have also exhumed the body of...
  • Stonehenge 5,000 Years Older Than Thought

    04/20/2013 6:32:59 AM PDT · by Sir Napsalot · 30 replies
    Discovery ^ | 4-19-2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Excavation near Stonehenge found evidence of a settlement dating back to 7,500 BC, revealing the site was occupied some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought. Working at Vespasian’s Camp in Amesbury, Wiltshire, less than a mile from the megalithic stones, a team led by archaeologist David Jacques of the Open University unearthed material which contradicted the general belief that no people settled there until as late as 2,500 BC. Indeed, carbon dating of the material revealed the existence of a semi-permanent settlement which was occupied from 7,500 to 4,700 BC. The dating showed that people were present during every millennium...
  • Girl spent 8 hours beneath bodies in French Alps (update to yesterday's story)

    09/06/2012 3:43:59 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 37 replies
    Immobilized with fear, a 4-year-old British girl huddled for eight hours beneath the legs of her slain mother in the back of a car filled with corpses on a remote Alpine road — all while French investigators stood nearby, unaware the girl was there.
  • Outrage as Muslim extremists hijack war heroes' town Wootton Bassett

    01/03/2010 4:02:35 PM PST · by SonOfDarkSkies · 37 replies · 1,283+ views
    A town famed for honouring dead British solders returning from Afghanistan expressed its dismay yesterday at plans by an extremist Islamic group to march through its streets. Islam4UK, which calls itself a ‘platform’ for the fanatical Al-Muhajiroun movement, said its supporters will parade through Wootton Bassett in the near future. The group’s website said the event is being held ‘not in memory of the occupying and merciless British military’ but of the Muslims ‘murdered in the name of democracy and freedom’. Its leader, Anjem Choudary, said the protest, involving 500 people, would be ‘peaceful’ and that ‘symbolic coffins’ would be...
  • Outrage over controversial Islamic group's plan to march through Wootton Bassett [must read from UK]

    01/02/2010 8:33:55 AM PST · by vimto · 28 replies · 906+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 01/02/10 | n/a
    People in Wootton Bassett, the town famous for honouring dead British soldiers returning from Afghanistan, reacted defiantly on Saturday to news that a controversial Islamic group is to march through its streets. Islam4UK – which calls itself a "platform" for extremist movement al-Muhajiroun – plans to parade through the Wiltshire town in the coming weeks. The group's website says the event is being held "not in memory of the occupying and merciless British military" but of the Muslims its says have been "murdered in the name of democracy and freedom". The town that shows respect for fallen Servicemen should be...
  • Outrage as Islamic extremists vow to march through streets of Wootton Bassett

    01/02/2010 5:12:29 AM PST · by naturalman1975 · 19 replies · 1,016+ views
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 2nd January 2009
    A town famous for honouring dead British soldiers returning from Afghanistan reacted defiantly today to news that a controversial Islamic group is to march through its streets. Islam4UK - which calls itself a 'platform' for extremist movement al-Muhajiroun - plans to parade through Wootton Bassett, in Wiltshire, in the coming weeks. The group's website says the event is being held 'not in memory of the occupying and merciless British military' but of the Muslims its says have been 'murdered in the name of democracy and freedom'. Leader Anjem Choudary said today the protest, involving 500 people, would be peaceful one,...
  • Health and safety killjoys tell war vets they are too old to hoist the Union Flag over town hall

    07/26/2008 11:24:35 AM PDT · by Stoat · 26 replies · 330+ views
    Health and safety killjoys tell war veterans they are too old to hoist the Union Flag over town hall Last updated at 02:38am on 26.07.08      Up in arms: Veterans John Ireland (right) and Keith Hutchins in front of the town hall In their younger days, they risked death and injury to fight for their country against the Nazis and other enemies.  But, now, war veterans who want to fly the Union Flag proudly above their town hall are being defeated by a barrage of health and safety rules.  Royal British Legion members had scented victory after fighting...
  • See the amazing picture by autistic artist who drew London from memory after single helicopter trip

    04/02/2008 10:57:55 AM PDT · by Stoat · 38 replies · 1,018+ views
    The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | April 2, 2008
    See the amazing picture by an autistic artist who drew London from memory after a single helicopter trip  This picture depicting the London skyline in fine detail was drawn after just one flight over the city and purely from memory.  Stephen Wiltshire, who was diagnosed with autism at the age of three, memorised the appearance and position of hundreds of London's buildings in exact scale during a helicopter ride along the Thames.  Over the next five days, the 33-year-old drew the seven-square mile panorama, including landmarks such as the Swiss Re tower, and Canary Wharf, on a 13ft curving canvas....
  • Terrifying Haunting or Clever Hoax? (Drummer of Tedworth)

    05/18/2006 8:58:07 PM PDT · by CurlyBill · 5 replies · 311+ views
    Ohmy News ^ | May 18, 2006 | C.H.L. George
    Terrifying Haunting or Clever Hoax? Was Mompesson's ghost a genuine spirit? In 1662 English landowner John Mompesson began telling the world that his household was haunted by an evil and mischievous spirit. In a letter to William Creed, Regius professor of Divinity at Oxford and a relation by marriage, he said that he had initially thought that the disturbances were the work of burglars, before being forced to conclude that they could only be supernatural. He blamed the visitations on the witchcraft of William Drury, a drummer he had caused to be arrested in March for claiming money under false...