Keyword: worldhistory

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  • A Brief Review Of History's 9 Deadliest Plagues

    10/08/2014 6:54:22 AM PDT · by blam · 12 replies
    BI ^ | 10-7-2014 | avid Kotok, Cumberland Advisors
    David Kotok, Cumberland AdvisorsOctober 7, 2014 “The practice of quarantine, as we know it, began during the 14th century in an effort to protect coastal cities from plague epidemics. Ships arriving in Venice from infected ports were required to sit at anchor for 40 days before landing. This practice, called quarantine, was derived from the Italian words quaranta giorni, which mean 40 days.” The modern world is now moving toward a full Ebola quarantine. I personally recall flying home from Europe in the 1960s while I was in the US Army. The plane was diverted to the Azores, and while...
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 54 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • Excavations unearth basilica in Bursa

    05/07/2014 6:52:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | May 2, 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Excavations at a tower in the Tophane portion of Bursa’s city walls have revealed a basilica from the early Roman era that could be one of the oldest structures ever discovered in the northwestern province. Architect İbrahim Yılmaz, who has been conducting the restoration projects on Bursa’s city walls, said the Tophane city walls restoration project included an area of 1,200 square meters from the north of the Saltanat Gate to the Kaplıca Gate... Speaking about the technical features of the basilica, Yılmaz said: “There is a round apse [the place for religious ceremonies] and a window bay in front...
  • Did the Exodus happen?

    04/18/2014 9:01:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 43 replies
    Jewish Journal ^ | 04/18/2014 | Dennis Prager
    With Passover here, it is a propitious time to address the central issue of the holiday: the Exodus. Specifically, did the Exodus happen? My friend Rabbi David Wolpe announced some years ago that it didn’t matter whether the Exodus occurred. In his words, writing three years later: “Three years ago on Passover, I explained to my congregation that according to archeologists, there was no reliable evidence that the Exodus took place — and that it almost certainly did not take place the way the Bible recounts it. Finally, I emphasized: It didn’t matter.” “The Torah,” he continued, “is not a...
  • Before Noah: Myths of the Flood Are Far Older Than the Bible

    04/07/2014 1:36:42 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 113 replies
    TIME ^ | 04/05/2014 | Ishaan Tharoor
    <p>Darren Aronofsky’s Noah dominated the U.S. box office on its opening weekend and won critical acclaim, but not without controversy. The film, based on the biblical story in Genesis of Noah’s Ark and the Great Flood, arrived amid a deluge of outrage from religious groups. Some Christians fumed at the film’s straying from biblical Scripture. Meanwhile, a host of Muslim-majority countries banned Noah from screening in theaters because representations of Noah, a prophet of God in the Koran, are considered blasphemous. Such images “provoke the feelings of believers and are forbidden in Islam and a clear violation of Islamic law,” read a fatwa issued by Cairo’s al-Azhar University, one of the foremost institutions of Sunni Islam. Egypt has not banned the film, but Indonesia, Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates have. “It is important to respect these religions and not show the film,” lectured the main censors of the UAE.</p>
  • 10 must see castles in Wales

    03/27/2014 4:45:12 PM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | 3-18-2014
    Castles have played an important military, economic and social role in Great Britain and Ireland since their introduction following the Norman invasion of England in 1066. Although a small number of castles had been built in England in the 1050s, the Normans began to build motte and bailey and ringworks castles in large numbers to control their newly occupied territories in England and the Welsh Marches.1 Caernarfon Castle Caernarfon Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon) is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales. There was a motte-and-bailey castle in the town of Caernarfon from the late 11th century until 1283 when...
  • Purima, The making of a King's Bride

    03/16/2014 10:36:28 AM PDT · by Errant · 79 replies
    As a believer, you may have never paid much attention to Purim, the story of Esther — but you should! In a prophetic sense, the story of Purim… is the story of YOUR life! The story of Purim is all about Esther (aka Hadassah), the unlikely choice of the king after his initial choice rejected him. Sounds like the love story of a certain Messiah we know, doesn’t it? That’s why the story of Purim is YOUR story. It’s all about being chosen and accepted, and being challenged to do the right thing even when all hope appears lost.
  • Naziism Paved the Way

    02/23/2014 12:27:40 PM PST · by Shery · 18 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 23.Feb.2014 | Enza Ferreri
    Of all the myriad myths spread at light speed by the enemies of Christianity and astonishingly believed without much critical thought by vast numbers of people, one of the most surreal must be the idea that Nazism was Christian. This is part of an email I received fromTony, a supporter of my party Liberty GB, who sent me a long list of sharp attacks against Christianity after watching my video: What Is Uniquely Good about Western Civilisation Derives from Christianity. For example Adolf Hitler was a Catholic and included proclamations of his beliefs in his writings, e.g. "We demand liberty...
  • Muslims Demand "Right of Return" to Spain

    02/23/2014 9:21:03 AM PST · by marshmallow · 36 replies
    The Gatestone Institute ^ | 2/21/14 | Soeren Kern
    Observers say that by granting citizenship to all descendants of expelled Muslims, Spain, virtually overnight, would end up with the largest Muslim population in the European Union."Is Spain aware of what might be assumed when it makes peace with some but not with others? Is Spain aware of what this decision [not to include Muslims in the return] could cost?... Does Spain have alternatives to the foreign investment from Muslims? — Ahmed Bensalh, Morisco-Moroccan journalist. "Persecution of Jews was just that, while what happened with the Arabs was part of a conflict. There is no basis for comparison." — Jose...
  • Spain grants right of dual nationality to Sephardi Jews

    02/10/2014 5:13:52 AM PST · by cll · 20 replies
    Israel Hayom ^ | 2/09/2014 | Eli Leon
    More than 500 years after the Spanish Inquisition, the Spanish government has voted to facilitate the naturalization of Jewish families of Spanish descent, without demanding they give up their other citizenship. Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain must be rolling in their graves: The government in Madrid on Friday approved legislation that would allow descendents of Jews who were exiled from Spain to be naturalized in the country without having to give up their former citizenship, which had been the law until now. Spanish Justice Minister Alberto Ruiz-Gallardon said that Spain "is indebted to Spanish Jews for spreading the...
  • Forget her bloody reputation, Mary I was loved in her lifetime

    11/01/2013 7:41:06 PM PDT · by markomalley · 45 replies
    Catholic Herald ^ | 10/31/2013 | LEANDA DE LISLE
    There will be no ‘Mary I and her People’ exhibitions to match that of Elizabeth I currently showing at the National Gallery. While Elizabeth I is regularly voted our most popular ever monarch her Catholic elder half sister remains associated with her late seventeenth century sobriquet, ‘Bloody Mary’. It is assumed she was hated in her lifetime. In fact she was a popular queen, and one from whom Elizabeth learned much. Mary’s accession to the throne in 1553 was not a smooth one. Her half brother, Edward VI, was a passionate Protestant, and when, aged fifteen, he fell gravely ill...
  • 'Roman' roads were actually built by the Celts, new book claims

    10/13/2013 4:02:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | Sunday, October 13, 2013 | Hayley Dixon
    The findings of Graham Robb, a biographer and historian, bring into question two millennia of thinking about Iron Age Britain and Europe and the stereotyped image of Celts as barbarous, superstitious tribes... "They had their own road system on which the Romans later based theirs," Mr Robb said, adding that the roads were built in Britain from around the 1st Century BC. "It has often been wondered how the Romans managed to build the Fosse Way, which goes from Exeter to Lincoln. They must have known what the finishing point would be, but they didn't conquer that part of Britain...
  • Robert the Bruce Battle of Bannockburn letter discovered

    06/01/2013 9:46:34 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 69 replies
    BBC News ^ | 1st June 2013 | BBC News
    'A copy of an unknown Robert the Bruce letter from the build-up to the Battle of Bannockburn has been discovered. The letter, sent in 1310, asks English King Edward II to stop persecuting the Scots. It shows Robert asserting his God-given authority as king of the Scots and addressing Edward as his equal. The script, thought to have been transcribed from the original, was discovered by chance by a professor of Scottish history at Glasgow University. Bruce's Scottish troops defeated the English army at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The new letter was found in a document which dates...
  • Unmarked Grave Dug up in Hunt for England's King Alfred the Great

    03/30/2013 5:24:37 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    CNN ^ | Wed March 27, 2013 | Laura Smith-Spark
    Archaeologists dug up an unmarked grave in a quiet English churchyard in search of remains of King Alfred the Great, a ninth century monarch credited with fending off the Vikings. The exhumation was apparently triggered by fears that interest over the recent discovery of the skeleton of Richard III could lead grave robbers to dig the area for his bones. Alfred the Great is known to generations of schoolchildren through a popular legend that tells of his scolding by a peasant woman for letting her cakes burn while he watched over them. He was at the time preoccupied with the...
  • Sephardic Jews invited back to Spain after 500 years

    03/06/2013 9:48:32 AM PST · by the scotsman · 56 replies
    BBC News ^ | 6th March 2013 | Gerry Hadden
    'More than 500 years ago, tens of thousands of Jews fled Spain because of persecution. Now their descendants are being invited to return. Before the infamous Spanish Inquisition of the 15th Century, some 300,000 Jews lived in Spain. It was one of the largest communities of Jews in the world. Today, there are about 40,000 or 50,000 - but that number could be about to swell dramatically. In November, Spain's justice minister Alberto Ruiz-Gallardon announced a plan to give descendants of Spain's original Jewish community - known as Sephardic Jews - a fast-track to a Spanish passport and Spanish citizenship....
  • Experts find remains of England's King Richard III

    02/04/2013 9:16:46 AM PST · by DJ MacWoW · 4 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Feb 4, 2013 11:13 AM (ET) | By JILL LAWLESS
    LEICESTER, England (AP) - He wore the English crown, but he ended up defeated, humiliated and reviled. Now things are looking up for King Richard III. Scientists announced Monday that they had found the monarch's 528-year-old remains under a parking lot in the city of Leicester - a discovery that will move him from a pauper's grave to a royal tomb and that fans say could potentially restore the reputation of a much-maligned king.
  • Timbuktu mayor: Mali rebels torched library of historic manuscripts

    01/28/2013 5:28:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    The Guardian, ^ | Monday 28 January 2013 12.07 EST | Luke Harding in Sévaré
    Fleeing Islamist insurgents burnt two buildings containing priceless books as French-led troops approached al-Qaida-allied fighters on Saturday torched two buildings that held the manuscripts, some of which dated back to the 13th century. They also burned down the town hall, the governor's office and an MP's residence, and shot dead a man who was celebrating the arrival of the French military. French troops and the Malian army reached the gates of Timbuktu on Saturday and secured the town's airport. But they appear to have got there too late to rescue the leather-bound manuscripts that were a unique record of sub-Saharan...
  • CAIR chief claims Muslims discovered America first

    01/04/2013 6:05:24 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 74 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 2:42 AM 01/04/2013 | Neil Munro
    Muslims discovered the Americas long before Columbus sailed the ocean blue in 1492, the head of a D.C.-based jihad-linked Islamic lobbying group told a Saudi TV station Dec. 27. “There are historical accounts according to which the Muslims preceded Columbus, who is said to have discovered the U.S.,” claimed Nihad Awad, the co-founder of the Council on American Islamic Relations. … CAIR did not respond to The Daily Caller’s request for an explanation of Awad’s comments, which were recorded by the Middle East Media Research Institute. …
  • An ‘Error Message’ on the Screen of Western Civ (RTS Chancellor on the importance of a work ethic)

    10/12/2012 6:08:35 AM PDT · by darrellmaurina · 11 replies
    Reformed Theological Seminary ^ | 12/31/2011 | Dr. Michael Milton
    An ‘Error Message’ on the Screen of Western Civ? The Most Important Question Facing us in 2012 is more than an Election The most important question of the coming year is not “who will be the next occupant of the White House?” The single most important matter before us all is a question of value. It is a question that may be stated, “Will the Western world embrace the very thing that holds it together. Or will it continue the denial of the obvious and seal its inevitable decline?” Let me explain. In historiography – the study of history –...
  • Wisdom Cries Out; The Olympic Opening

    Wisdom crieth without; she uttereth her voice in the streets:(Proverbs 1:20)What a privilege and opportunity for any nation to be able to host an Olympics. The opening ceremony is a unique opportunity to display the glories of the host country. But that would presuppose that the presenters actually believe in the validity of their own national story. IÂ’ve been told that an unprecedented one billion people around the world witnessed this yearÂ’s London opening ceremony. I also was eager to see how the narrative of the nation of Shakespeare, Donne, Churchill, the Puritans, Wilberforce and countless other of the remarkable...
  • Romney Advisor To London Telegraph: Obama Doesn’t “Fully Appreciate” Our “Anglo Saxon Heritage”

    07/24/2012 11:16:41 PM PDT · by GLH3IL · 27 replies
    Liberaland ^ | July 24, 2012 | Alan Combs
    Ahead of Mitt Romney’s trip to Britain, Jon Swaine of The Telegraph says a Romney advisor told the paper, “We are part of an Anglo-Saxon heritage, and he feels that the special relationship is special. The White House didn’t fully appreciate the shared history we have.” Another Romney advisor said, “Obama is a Left-winger. He doesn’t value the Nato alliance as much, he’s very comfortable with American decline and the traditional alliances don’t mean as much to him. He wouldn’t like singing ‘Land of Hope and Glory’.”
  • The First Crusade, the true story

    02/27/2012 12:07:26 AM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 38 replies · 2+ views
    ekathimerini.com ^ | By Peter Frankopan
    Why was there a sudden need to recover the city where Jesus Christ lived and was crucified? The answer, writes Peter Frankopan, lies in the imperial capital of Constantinople. On November 27, 1095, Pope Urban II stood up at the Council of Clermont in central France to make an important announcement. Persians (by whom he meant the Turks), “a people rejected by God,” had risen up against the Christians in the East, he said. It was imperative for the knighthood of Europe to rush to defend their brethren. Take up arms, he urged, and defend the faithful who were suffering...
  • Sexing Up International Relations

    11/03/2011 7:32:21 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 3 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | November 1, 2011 | Malcolm A. Kline
    Teaching tools have apparently become more exotic since the days of slide rules and overhead projectors. When his freewheeling pedagogical style landed him, effectively, in the Dean’s office, International Relations professor Arthur N. Gilbert found himself making what, for many, would be embarrassing admissions. For example, the tenured University of Denver associate professor “explained that he brings in an old, art-deco vibrator in [sic] lecturing students on gender-related differences in attitudes toward masturbation and masculine self-control in the late 19th century,” Peter Schmidt reported in The Chronicle of Higher Education in the issue that comes out on November 4, 2011....
  • The Catholic Church and the Spanish Civil War

    10/23/2010 6:56:56 PM PDT · by tesbassa · 23 replies
    Irish Press ^ | 10/20/1936
    Noted Catholic Scholar on “Spain”_______________________ REV. DR. RYAN TRACES ORIGINS OF THE STRUGGLE ______________________ Basques and Moors “If the people of Spain hadn’t risen against such atrocities they would not have been the valiant sons of Spain that they are but despicable cowards,” declared Very Rev. Dr. A. H. Ryan, Professor of Scholastic Philosophy, Queen’s University, Belfast, in an address on “Spain” in St. Mary’s Hall, Belfast, last night. Over 200 people attended, among them the Bishop of Down and Connor, Most Rev. Dr. Mageean. Mr. Raymond Burke presided. Dr. Ryan said that the deplorable events in Spain since the...
  • The Bible: Embarrassing and True

    05/06/2010 4:31:20 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 30 replies · 1,178+ views
    Townhall.com ^ | May 6, 2010 | Frank Turek
    What are your most embarrassing moments? You don’t want to admit them. And if you do admit them, you certainly won’t add to your shame by inventing embarrassing moments about yourself to make you look even worse. Who’s going to lie to make himself look bad? People will lie to make themselves look good (especially politicians), but no one will lie to make himself look bad. That’s why when historical accounts contain events embarrassing to the authors (or heroes of the authors) those events are probably true. Historians call this the principle of embarrassment, and it’s one reason why I...
  • The Glory of Poland

    04/12/2010 12:41:25 PM PDT · by lizol · 30 replies · 1,109+ views
    The New York Times ^ | April 12, 2010 | ROGER COHEN
    The Glory of Poland By ROGER COHEN Published: April 12, 2010 NEW YORK — My first thought, hearing of the Polish tragedy, was that history’s gyre can be of an unbearable cruelty, decapitating Poland’s elite twice in the same cursed place, Katyn. My second was to call my old friend Adam Michnik in Warsaw. Michnik, an intellectual imprisoned six times by the former puppet-Soviet Communist rulers, once told me: “Anyone who has suffered that humiliation, at some level, wants revenge. I know all the lies. I saw people being killed. But I also know that revanchism is never ending. And...
  • History of England starts at 1700, says university

    02/11/2010 3:19:42 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 64 replies · 1,362+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 2/11/2010 | Graeme Paton
    Academics have attacked a decision by a top university to scrap research into English history before 1700. It was claimed that the move by Sussex University risked jeopardising the nation’s understanding of the subject and “entrenching the ignorance of the present”. Under plans, research and in-depth teaching into periods such as the Tudors, the Middle-Ages, Norman Britain, the Viking invasion and the Anglo-Saxons will be scrapped, along with the Civil Wars. The university will also end research into the history of continental Europe pre-1900, affecting the study of the Napoleonic wars and the Roman Empire. The university said it was...
  • The fall of Spain, the first global superpower, and the fall of the US

    It may be hard for most people to imagine, but Spain was the first global Superpower. It gained this status as the defender of Europe against Muslim armies and by leading the West’s exploration of America. In 1492, the same year that Spanish-financed Christopher Columbus discovered the New World, the last Muslim stronghold of Granada was ceded to Ferdinand and Isabella to complete the Catholic Reconquest of the Iberian peninsula... It controlled rich parts of Italy through Naples and Milan, and Central Europe from the Netherlands through the Holy Roman Empire to Austria. In the 16th century it added the...
  • Lazy, arrogant cowards: how English saw French in 12th century

    01/17/2010 12:08:03 AM PST · by bruinbirdman · 33 replies · 1,360+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 1/17/2010 | Jonathan Wynne-Jones
    Twelfth-century poem newly translated into English casts fresh light on the origin of today's Francophobic stereotypes Although it is meant to be an 'entente cordiale', the relationship between the English and the French has been anything but neighbourly. Poet Andrew de Coutances, an Anglo-Norman cleric, describes the French as godless, arrogant and lazy dogs When the two nations have not been clashing on the battlefield or the sporting pitch they have been trading insults from 'frogs' to 'rosbifs'. Now the translation of the poem has shown just how deep-rooted in history the rivalry and name-calling really is. Written between 1180...
  • Crusaders and Jerusalem

    01/17/2010 6:52:18 PM PST · by Ryde · 27 replies · 822+ views
    01/17/10 | Ryde
    Freepers: I happened to be reading my grandson's college text on the Middle East. Now I know that the crusades were a bloody affair--but all wars are bloody. In an age where there were no firearms, warriors often ended up fighting nose-to-nose and covered in each other's gore. Now according to the text, no more than 12,000 crusaders made it to Jerusalem in total--1,500 men in armor. Then they fought their way over the walls--were repulsed once--and then had to fight their way uphill to take the city. So, when the capture occurred, there could not have been a whole...
  • Laminated Linen Protected Alexander the Great

    01/16/2010 8:09:03 AM PST · by Palter · 36 replies · 1,503+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 11 Jan 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Alexander's men wore linothorax, a highly effective type of body armor created by laminating together layers of linen, research finds. A Kevlar-like armor might have helped Alexander the Great (356–323 B.C.) conquer nearly the entirety of the known world in little more than two decades, according to new reconstructive archaeology research. Presented at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Anaheim, Calif., the study suggests that Alexander and his soldiers protected themselves with linothorax, a type of body armor made by laminating together layers of linen. "While we know quite a lot about ancient armor made from...
  • Why is Haiti so poor? A history of quake-hit island (Was once France’s richest colonial possession)

    01/16/2010 3:27:48 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 70 replies · 3,219+ views
    The First Post ^ | 01/15/2010 | Tim Edwards
    Once the richest French colony in the Americas - contributing as much as 50 per cent of the mother country's wealth - Haiti now vies with Nicaragua for the title of poorest country in the New World. Thanks to yesterday's magnitude 7.0 earthquake, it is likely to fall further behind its fellow developing nations. The nation, the western half of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, came under French rule in 1697 when it was called Saint-Domingue. (The eastern other half of the island - now the Dominican Republic - went to the Spaniards.) Through the course of the 18th century...
  • So that's what the Romans gave us -- more historic camps than anywhere [Scotland]

    11/21/2009 6:41:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 851+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Thursday, November 19, 2009 | Tim Cornwell
    Scotland already has more identified Roman camps than any other European country -- reflecting Rome's repeated attempts to stamp its rule on the troublesome north. Now the number is set to increase. The first comprehensive survey of Roman remains for 30 years will boost the total of officially recognised sites and give them greater legal protection, officials said yesterday. Traces of at least 225 Roman military camps dot the Scottish countryside from the Borders to Aberdeenshire... They can be spotted today mostly from the air, where the distinctive bank and ditch defences thrown up by the legionaries still mark the...
  • The collapse of communism: Reagan, Thatcher and the Pope

    11/09/2009 2:30:05 PM PST · by doug from upland · 14 replies · 1,089+ views
    Deseret News ^ | 11-2009 | Cannon
    The collapse of communism: Reagan, Thatcher and the pope By Joseph A. Cannon Deseret News Published: Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009 12:12 a.m. MST Twenty years ago, my wife, Jan, and I were in what was then called West Berlin for a conference. One pleasant afternoon we walked along the Berlin Wall from the Brandenburg Gate to Checkpoint Charlie. During that time, there were significant rancorous anti-Communist demonstrations in East Germany, primarily in the southern part. A German friend, with typical Prussian hubris, dismissed them. "Nothing will come of this, these are just the ineffective rumblings of a bunch of Bavarians."...
  • Centuries Later, Henry V’s Greatest Victory Is Besieged by Academia

    10/24/2009 10:38:13 AM PDT · by Saije · 30 replies · 1,271+ views
    Ny Times ^ | 10/24/2009 | James Glanz
    The heavy clay-laced mud behind the cattle pen on Antoine Renault’s farm looks as treacherous as it must have been nearly 600 years ago, when King Henry V rode from a spot near here to lead a sodden and exhausted English Army against a French force that was said to outnumber his by as much as five to one. No one can ever take away the shocking victory by Henry and his “band of brothers,” as Shakespeare would famously call them, on St. Crispin’s Day, Oct. 25, 1415. They devastated a force of heavily armored French nobles who had gotten...
  • Darker side of Columbus taught in US classrooms

    10/12/2009 8:05:15 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 68 replies · 1,506+ views
    AP ^ | October 12, 2009 | Christine Armario
    TAMPA, Fla. - Jeffrey Kolowith’s kindergarten students read a poem about Christopher Columbus, take a journey to the New World on three paper ships, and place the explorer’s picture on a timeline through history. Kolowith’s students learn about the explorer’s significance, but they also come away with a more nuanced picture of Columbus than the noble discoverer often portrayed in pop culture and legend. “I talk about the situation where he didn’t even realize where he was,’’ Kolowith said. “And we talked about how he was very, very mean, very bossy.’’ Columbus’s stature in US classrooms has declined somewhat through...
  • A Darker Side of Columbus Emerges in US Classrooms

    10/11/2009 8:18:44 AM PDT · by reaganaut1 · 83 replies · 2,402+ views
    Associated Press ^ | October 11, 2009
    TAMPA, Fla. (AP) -- Jeffrey Kolowith's kindergarten students read a poem about Christopher Columbus, take a journey to the New World on three paper ships and place the explorer's picture on a timeline through history. Kolowith's students learn about the explorer's significance -- though they also come away with a more nuanced picture of Columbus than the noble discoverer often portrayed in pop culture and legend. ''I talk about the situation where he didn't even realize where he was,'' Kolowith said. ''And we talked about how he was very, very mean, very bossy.'' Columbus' stature in U.S. classrooms has declined...
  • A darker side of Columbus emerges in US classrooms

    10/11/2009 11:36:57 AM PDT · by Chet 99 · 63 replies · 2,148+ views
    TAMPA, Fla. – Jeffrey Kolowith's kindergarten students read a poem about Christopher Columbus, take a journey to the New World on three paper ships and place the explorer's picture on a timeline through history. Kolowith's students learn about the explorer's significance — though they also come away with a more nuanced picture of Columbus than the noble discoverer often portrayed in pop culture and legend. "I talk about the situation where he didn't even realize where he was," Kolowith said. "And we talked about how he was very, very mean, very bossy."
  • Margaret Thatcher airbrushed from Harriet Harman's history of women in politics

    09/30/2009 4:20:09 PM PDT · by SmokingJoe · 31 replies · 1,178+ views
    The Daily Telegraph UK ^ | 15 Sep 2009 | Andrew Pierce
    The paper, Women in Power: Milestones, listed 28 of the most significant events between 1907 and 2008 involving women on the political stage. The milestones included the election of the first female Head of Government – Sirimavo Bandaranaike, the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka in 1960 and Britain's first woman councillor Reina Emily Lawrence in 1907. The document, produced by the Equality Office which is run by Miss Harman, the deputy leader of the Labour Party, highlights the role of Nancy Astor who was the first woman to take her seat in parliament in 1919, the election of Dianne Abbott...
  • Undercover Queen:THE SECRET WIFE OF LOUIS XIV Françoise d’Aubigné, Madame de Maintenon

    09/07/2009 2:41:35 PM PDT · by Cincinna · 25 replies · 3,333+ views
    The New York Times ^ | September 6, 2009 | Veronica Buckley
    “Kings,” Louis XIV once observed, “should enjoy giving pleasure” and when it came to the fairer sex, he obeyed this precept zealously and often. “They’re all good enough for him, provided they’re women,” his sister-in-law remarked, “peasants, gardeners’ daughters, chambermaids, ladies of quality”; women of every stripe benefited from the Sun King’s sexual largesse. Neither the bonds of matrimony (to the sad, neglected Marie-Thérèse of Spain) nor the intrigues of his “official” mistresses (one of whom, Athénaïs de Montespan, wasn’t above spreading the rumor that a particular rival had scabs all over her body) could deter him from sharing the...
  • In Revolutionary Color

    09/07/2009 11:00:54 AM PDT · by beaversmom · 16 replies · 1,209+ views
    Newsweek ^ | September 2009 | Newsweek
    Russian photos taken 100 years ago look as if they were taken yesterday.
  • White Europeans evolved only ‘5,500 years ago’

    08/30/2009 10:40:35 AM PDT · by decimon · 150 replies · 4,451+ views
    The Sunday Times ^ | August 30, 2009 | Jonathan Leake
    White Europeans could have evolved as recently as 5,500 years ago, according to research which suggests that the early humans who populated Britain and Scandinavia had dark skins for millenniums. It was only when early humans gave up hunter-gathering and switched to farming about 5,500 years ago that white skin began to be favoured, say the researchers. This is because farmed food was deficient in vitamin D, a vital nutrient. Humans can make this in their skin when exposed to sunlight, but dark skin is much less efficient at it. In places such as northern Europe, where sunlight levels are...
  • Briton found America in 1499

    08/29/2009 12:03:39 AM PDT · by OldSpice · 36 replies · 1,365+ views
    The Daily Mirror ^ | 29 Aug., 2009 | By Tom Pettifor
    The first Briton sailed to the New World only seven years after Columbus, a long-lost royal letter reveals.Written by Henry VII 510 years ago, it suggests Bristol merchant William Weston headed for America in 1499.In his letter the king, right, instructs his Chancellor to suspend an injunction against Weston because "he will shortly with God's grace, pass and sail for to search and find if he can the new found land".Bristol University's Dr Evan Jones believes it was probably the earliest attempt to find the North-West Passage - the searoute around North America to the Pacific. He said: "Henry's...
  • Moscow annoyed by attempts to rewrite WWII history

    08/28/2009 2:05:20 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 58 replies · 1,530+ views
    en.rian.ru ^ | August 28, 2008 | RIA Novosti)
    MOSCOW, August 28 (RIA Novosti) - Russia rejects all attempts to hold it responsible for the tragedies of World War II, the head of a presidential commission said on Friday. In mid-May, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev ordered the establishment of a special commission to counter attempts to falsify history to the detriment of Russia's interests. The commission is comprised of 28 officials from the presidential administration, the Federal Security Service (FSB), the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR), the State Duma, the Public Chamber, the state archives and science agencies, as well as the foreign, regional development, justice, and culture ministries. Presidential...
  • Ukraine commemorates defeat of Sweden at Poltava

    06/29/2009 3:01:57 PM PDT · by Bushwacker777 · 17 replies · 785+ views
    The Local ^ | June 28, 2009 | AFP/The Local
    "Ukrainian and Russian officials commemorated the 300th anniversary of the defeat of Sweden at the battle of Poltava with the unveiling of a new memorial on Saturday. The commemoration ceremonies showed that the victory, which marked the beginning of Russian imperial dominance of eastern Europe, continues to cause controversy over how history should be remembered. High-profile delegations, including Kremlin administration chief Sergei Naryshkin and top Ukrainian presidency officials, inaugurated a memorial to soldiers killed in the battle and placed garlands in front of local monuments. "After the battle of Poltava... no-one on the European continent could ignore Russia's political will,"...
  • Obama throughout History

    06/20/2009 12:06:34 PM PDT · by PghBaldy · 39 replies · 1,003+ views
    National Review ^ | June 17 | Rich Lowry
    On the Sack of Rome: "Any time a major urban area is plundered so quickly, it is concerning to us. We are sure the Gauls and Chieftain Brennus understand Roman worries about the utter devastation of their city." On the Blitz: "Any time a city is bombed for 57 straight nights, we take notice. That is something that interests us. We hope all national air forces involved in this dismaying conflict behave responsibly." On the creation of the Berlin Wall: "Any time a barrier divides people we get worried, and perhaps even chagrined. We hope all Germans can work this...
  • HISTORY OF THE HUGUENOTS

    06/19/2009 3:54:08 PM PDT · by alpha-8-25-02 · 159 replies · 3,370+ views
    6/19/09 | ALPHA-8-25-02
    Who were the Huguenots? John Calvin (1509 - 1564), religious reformer. The Huguenots were French Protestants who were members of the Reformed Church which was established in 1550 by John Calvin. The origin of the name Huguenot is uncertain, but dates from approximately 1550 when it was used in court cases against "heretics" (dissenters from the Roman Catholic Church). There is a theory that it is derived from the personal name of Besançon Hugues, the leader of the "Confederate Party" in Geneva, in combination with a Frankish corruption of the German word for conspirator or confederate: eidgenosse. Thus, Hugues plus...
  • The Illustrious Dead: The Terrifying Story of How Typhus Killed Napoleon's Greatest Army

    05/31/2009 1:03:31 PM PDT · by decimon · 69 replies · 1,921+ views
    Amazon.com ^ | Unknown | Unknown
    > Even as the Russians retreated before him in disarray, Napoleon found his army disappearing, his frantic doctors powerless to explain what had struck down a hundred thousand soldiers. The emperor’s vaunted military brilliance suddenly seemed useless, and when the Russians put their own occupied capital to the torch, the campaign became a desperate race through the frozen landscape as troops continued to die by the thousands. Through it all, with tragic heroism, Napoleon’s disease-ravaged, freezing, starving men somehow rallied, again and again, to cries of “Vive l’Empereur!” >
  • MILLIONS IN CHINA WANDER HOMELESS (3/22/39)

    03/22/2009 8:44:20 AM PDT · by Homer_J_Simpson · 7 replies · 473+ views
    Microfiche-New York Times archives, McHenry Library, U.C. Santa Cruz | 3/22/39
  • Why German Christians Elected and Supported Hitler

    11/13/2008 8:40:57 AM PST · by fightinJAG · 116 replies · 2,499+ views
    Worship.com ^ | Oct 10, 2008 | Josh Riley
    Economy in a freefall. Political rhetoric. An apathetic electorate dismayed by the slide of their country into irrelevence. Theological liberalism. Doctrinal indifference. America, 2008? No. Germany, just before electing Adolf Hitler to lead their country, with the apparent support of the majority of those who considered themselves Christians. We're rereading a book []by Erwin Lutzer []. In it Lutzer looks at the holocaust and the rise of Hitler and asks the question: where was the Church? This book is a fascinating read, particularly in this time of economic upheaval and election year rhetoric. [snip]Did you know that Hitler was elected...