Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $51,535
58%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 58%!! Thank you all very much for your continuing support!

Keyword: worldsincollision

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Jupiter and Venus Change Earth’s Orbit Every 405,000 Years

    05/10/2018 7:28:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 61 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 05/10/2018 | Matt Williams
    Over the course of the past 200 million years, our planet has experienced four major geological periods (the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous and Cenozoic) and one major ice age (the Pliocene-Quaternary glaciation), all of which had a drastic impact on plant and animal life, as well as effecting the course of species evolution. For decades, geologists have also understood that these changes are due in part to gradual shifts in the Earth’s orbit, which are caused by Venus and Jupiter, and repeat regularly every 405,000 years. But it was not until recently that a team of geologists and Earth scientists...
  • Exiled exoplanet likely kicked out of star's neighborhood

    12/02/2015 3:07:04 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    A planet discovered last year sitting at an unusually large distance from its star - 16 times farther than Pluto is from the sun - may have been kicked out of its birthplace close to the star in a process similar to what may have happened early in our own solar system's history. Images from the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) in the Chilean Andes and the Hubble Space Telescope show that the star has a lopsided comet belt indicative of a very disturbed solar system, and hinting that the planet interactions that roiled the comets closer to the star might...
  • Are Jupiters Hard to Come By?

    08/12/2008 10:01:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 110+ views
    Sky and Telescope 'blogs ^ | July 11, 2008 | Camille M. Carlisle
    Using the new Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA), Eisner and his colleagues observed more than 250 stars in Orion's central region and found that less than 8% had dust disks thought massive enough to create a Jupiter. The radiation from hot, massive stars in the cluster probably clears out a lot of surrounding material and keeps high-mass disks from forming, explains co-author John Carpenter (Caltech). In all, about 10% of the observed stars emit radiation associated with warm dust disks. The results agree almost perfectly with findings by Geoff Marcy (UC Berkeley) and his colleagues, who conclude...
  • New data challenge Earth atmosphere theory

    11/03/2007 10:30:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies · 51+ views
    Newsdaily ^ | September 19, 2007 | United Press International
    U.S. geochemists challenged commonly held theories about how gases are expelled from the Earth and how a planet's atmosphere is formed. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute researchers said their new theory could change the way scientists view the timing and mechanism involved in the formation of Earth's atmosphere, as well as the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. The team, led by Professor E. Bruce Watson, said it has found substantial evidence that argon atoms are strongly bound in the minerals of Earth's mantle and move through those minerals at a much slower rate than previously thought. In fact, they said they discovered...
  • Double Whammy: 2 Meteors Hit Ancient Earth At The Same Time

    09/15/2015 9:53:39 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies
    Fox News - Live Science ^ | 9-15-2015 | Elizabeth Palermo
    Elizabeth Palermo September 15, 2015An artist's depiction of the dual meteor strike. (Don Dixon/Erik Sturkell/University of Gothenburg) It's not altogether uncommon to hear about double rainbows, but what about a double meteor strike? It's a rare event, but researchers in Sweden recently found evidence that two meteors smacked into Earth at the same time, about 458 million years ago. Researchers from the University of Gothenburg uncovered two craters in the county of Jämtland in central Sweden. The meteors that formed the craters landed just a few miles from each other at the same moment, according to Erik Sturkell, a professor...
  • Asteroid threat in 2032? Don't panic, but don't brush it off

    02/09/2014 3:40:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    NBC News ^ | February 3rd 2014 | Alan Boyle
    A big asteroid sailed past Earth last month, and astronomers haven't yet totally excluded the possibility that it'll hit us when it comes around in 2032. If the past is any guide, we won't have to worry about asteroid 2013 TV135 — but it's a reminder that we'll have to fend off a killer space rock one of these days. Ukrainian astronomers discovered 2013 TV135 just 10 days ago, well after the asteroid had its close encounter with Earth on Sept. 16. Actually, it wasn't all that close: The distance was 4.2 million miles (6.7 million kilometers), or about 17...
  • Jupiter Has Taken a Massive Meteor Hit (So Earth Didn’t Have To)

    09/12/2012 2:41:21 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 47 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 9/12/12 | Jamie Condliffe
    On Monday, Jupiter took a massive hit from a meteor, which was spotted by amateur astronomers based in the US—and if previous evidence is anything to go by, it could have saved Earth from a massive collision in the process. Dan Peterson of Racine, Wisconsin, was gazing at Jupiter on Monday when he saw a bright, white flash on the surface of the planet. When he posted his observation online, another astrophotographer, George Hall, discovered he'd unknowingly captured the massive explosion on video. Turns out it was probably a meteor striking the surface of the planet—and you can watch the...
  • Space news: Fireballs light up Jupiter

    09/13/2010 9:38:58 AM PDT · by granite · 22 replies · 1+ views
    Lake County News ^ | Sunday, 12 September 2010 | Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
    A color composite image of the June 3, 2010, Jupiter impact flash. Credit: Anthony Wesley observing from Broken Hill, Australia. In a paper published Thursday in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, a group of professional and amateur astronomers announced that Jupiter is getting hit surprisingly often by small asteroids, lighting up the giant planet's atmosphere with frequent fireballs. "Jupiter is a big gravitational vacuum cleaner," said co-author and JPL astronomer Glenn Orton. "It is clear now that relatively small objects left over from the formation of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago still hit Jupiter frequently." The impacts are...
  • Hubble Space Telescope Captures Rare Jupiter Collision

    06/06/2010 4:09:09 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 16 replies · 1,672+ views
    NASA | 06.03.10
    Without warning, a mystery object struck Jupiter on July 19, 2009, leaving a dark bruise the size of the Pacific Ocean. The spot first caught the eye of an amateur astronomer in Australia, and soon, observatories around the world, including NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, were zeroing in on the unexpected blemish. Astronomers had witnessed this kind of cosmic event before. Similar scars had been left behind during the course of a week in July 1994, when more than 20 pieces of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) plunged into Jupiter’s atmosphere. The 2009 impact occurred during the same week, 15 years later....
  • Anthony Wesley records another impact on Jupiter!

    06/03/2010 7:11:22 PM PDT · by Yossarian · 19 replies · 761+ views
    Ice in Space (Australian Amateur Astronomy) ^ | 6/3/2010 | Anthony Wesley, by way of Mike Salway
    In breaking news, Anthony Wesley reports another impact on Jupiter, this morning. In his words: ".. at approximately 20:30utc this morning I recorded a large fireball on Jupiter, it lasted a couple of seconds and was very bright.This was a large fireball, but it doesn't seem to have left any mark, probably all gone in the upper atmosphere before it reached the clouds."His preliminary image (a raw frame from the video) is shown below. The fireball can be seen in the upper left of frame. A video and more details will follow soon.Stay tuned to IceInSpace for more, and for...
  • Third Jupiter Fireball Spotted——Sky-Watching Army Needed?

    08/25/2010 9:30:12 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8/24/10 | Andrew Fazekas
    Amateur sightings prompt call for a network of backyard astronomers.On August 20, for the third time in about a year, amateur astronomers spotted a fireball above Jupiter's atmosphere. The discovery suggests the planet gets walloped more often than previously thought, say astronomers, some of whom are calling for a global "volunteer army" of backyard Jupiter watchers. The recent flash follows on the heels of July 2009 and June 2010 fireballs over the gas giant planet. (See "Bright Fireball Slams Into Jupiter" [June 2010] and "Jupiter Impact Creates Huge New Spot" [July 2009].) Astronomers speculate that the August 20 flash was...
  • "Asteroid Impacts are the Biggest Threat to Advanced Life in the Milky Way" -Stephen Hawking

    09/26/2009 9:43:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 24 replies · 1,597+ views
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 9/26/09 | Stephen Hawking
    Stephen Hawking believes that one of the major factors in the possible scarcity of intelligent life in our galaxy is the high probability of an asteroid or comet colliding with inhabited planets. We have observed, Hawking points out in Life in the Universe, the collision of a comet, Schumacher-Levi, with Jupiter (below), which produced a series of enormous fireballs, plumes many thousands of kilometers high, hot "bubbles" of gas in the atmosphere, and large dark "scars" on the atmosphere which had lifetimes on the order of weeks. It is thought the collision of a rather smaller body with the Earth,...
  • Craters on Vesta and Ceres could hold key to Jupiter’s age

    09/19/2009 4:03:05 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 15 replies · 772+ views
    SCIENCE CENTRIC ^ | 14 September 2009 00:02 GMT | by Anita Heward
    Crater patterns on Vesta and Ceres could help pinpoint when Jupiter began to form during the evolution of the early Solar System. A study modelling the cratering history of the largest two objects in the asteroid belt, which are believed to be among the oldest in the Solar System, indicates that the type and distribution of craters would show marked changes at different stages of Jupiter’s development. Results will be presented by Dr Diego Turrini at the European Planetary Science Congress in Potsdam, Germany, on Monday 14 September. The study, carried out by scientists at the Italian National Institute for...
  • Hubble pictures Jupiter's 'scar'

    07/26/2009 5:15:10 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 23 replies · 624+ views
    Hubble has trained its new camera on the atmospheric disturbance on Jupiter believed to have been caused by a comet or asteroid impact. The telescope used the Wide Field Camera 3 fitted on the recent shuttle servicing mission to capture ultra-sharp visible-light images of the scar. The dark spot near the gas giant's southern pole was noticed first by an amateur Australian astronomer.
  • Jupiter Struck by Object, NASA Images Confirm

    07/21/2009 6:07:43 AM PDT · by Red in Blue PA · 105 replies · 2,483+ views
    Foxnews ^ | 7/21/2009 | Staff
    PASADENA, California — A large comet or asteroid has slammed into Jupiter, creating an impact site the size of Earth, pictures by an Australian amateur astronomer show. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed the discovery using its large infrared telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, said computer programer Anthony Wesley, 44, who discovered the impact zone while stargazing at home. News of Wesley's find on a backyard 14.5-inch reflecting telescope has stunned the astronomy world, with scientists saying the impact will last only days more. Wesley said it took him 30 minutes to realize a dark spot rotating...
  • Rethinking Jupiter

    11/12/2007 9:59:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 94+ views
    Astrobio.net ^ | Monday, November 12, 2007 | Lee Pullen
    Without Jupiter acting as a "cosmic vacuum cleaner" sucking up these dangerous objects, there would be so many catastrophic impacts that life probably wouldn't have evolved on the Earth and we wouldn't be here today... "This vacuum cleaner idea goes back to when the long-period comets coming in from the Oort Cloud were viewed as being the only significant impact risk," says Horner. "In the 1950s there were only one or two near-Earth asteroids known, so they were viewed as oddities." ...Since the 1950s, scientists have discovered more objects in the solar system, and they say many of them could...
  • New Planet Found in Our Solar System?

    05/12/2012 3:44:38 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 42 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 5/11/12 | Richard A. Lovett
    Odd orbits of remote objects hint at unseen world, new calculations suggest. An as yet undiscovered planet might be orbiting at the dark fringes of the solar system, according to new research.Too far out to be easily spotted by telescopes, the potential unseen planet appears to be making its presence felt by disturbing the orbits of so-called Kuiper belt objects, said Rodney Gomes, an astronomer at the National Observatory of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. Kuiper belt objects are small icy bodies—including some dwarf planets—that lie beyond the orbit of Neptune. Once considered the ninth planet in our system, the...
  • Lost in Space: Half of All Stars Are Rogues Between Galaxies

    11/07/2014 1:26:34 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    space.com ^ | Charles Q. Choi
    A star mystery solved? These newfound stars could help solve the so-called "photon underproduction crisis," which suggests that an extraordinary amount of ultraviolet light appears to be missing from the universe. The intergalactic stars could also help address what is known as the "missing baryon problem." Baryons are a class of subatomic particles that includes the protons and neutrons that make up the hearts of atoms inside normal matter. Theories of the formation and evolution of the universe predict there should be far more baryons than scientists currently see. The baryons that astronomers have accounted for in the local cosmic...
  • 'Orphan' alien planet with no parent is found near Earth

    11/14/2012 7:55:04 PM PST · by Altariel · 48 replies
    MSNBC ^ | November 14, 2012 | Mike Wall
    Astronomers have discovered a potential "rogue" alien planet wandering alone just 100 light-years from Earth, suggesting that such starless worlds may be extremely common across the galaxy. The free-floating object, called CFBDSIR2149, is likely a gas giant planet four to seven times more massive than Jupiter, scientists say in a new study unveiled Wednesday. The planet cruises unbound through space relatively close to Earth (in astronomical terms), perhaps after being booted from its own solar system. "If this little object is a planet that has been ejected from its native system, it conjures up the striking image of orphaned worlds,...
  • Scientists tell of 'runaway' planets

    03/22/2012 11:14:22 PM PDT · by U-238 · 27 replies · 2+ views
    UPI ^ | March 22, 2012 | UPI
    U.S. scientists studying "runaway" stars tossed out of our galaxy at great velocities say they've confirmed the same thing can happen to planets. The first runaway star was discovered seven years ago, heading out of the Milky Way at 1.5 million mph, and new research says planets must be doing the same thing -- at speeds up to 30 million mph, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics reported Thursday. "These warp-speed planets would be some of the fastest objects in our galaxy," astrophysicist Avi Loeb said. "If you lived on one of them, you'd be in for a wild ride from...