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  • SCOTUS just quietly overturned decision allowing internment of Japanese-Americans in WWII

    06/26/2018 1:56:40 PM PDT · by NRx · 118 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 06-26-2016 | Reuters
    The Supreme Court just quietly overturned a decision that upheld the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II as part of a ruling upholding President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban that primarily targets majority-Muslim countries. During World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, which led the US government to force more than 100,000 people of Japanese descent into detention camps. The decision overruled by the Supreme Court on Tuesday, Korematsu v. United States, was centered around a man named Fred Korematsu, a Japanese-American who refused to comply with the order. On December 18, 1944, the Supreme...
  • Missing sub rumored to have brought Nazis to South America discovered

    04/19/2018 10:55:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 53 replies
    nypost.com ^ | April 18, 2018 | 1:08pm | By Jon Lockett, The Sun
    The missing submarine was found off the coast of Denmark. Sea War Museum Jutland _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ A missing German submarine said to have taken the defeated Nazi leadership to South America has been discovered after being lost at sea for nearly 73 years. The U-3523 was one of Hitler’s Type XXI submarines – a new and highly advanced design which came too late to stop an allied victory. It was the first class of U-boats designed to sail submerged for a prolonged period of time and had a range which allowed it to sail non-stop to South America. The U-3523...
  • Bloody but forgotten WWII battle still haunts soldiers

    05/28/2018 2:39:19 PM PDT · by BBell · 95 replies
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — William Roy Dover's memory of the World War II battle is as sharp as it was 75 years ago, even though it's been long forgotten by most everyone else. His first sergeant rousted him from his pup tent around 2 a.m. when word came the Japanese were attacking and had maybe even gotten behind the American front line, on a desolate, unforgiving slab of an occupied island in the North Pacific. "He was shouting, 'Get up! Get out!'" Dover said. Dover and most of the American soldiers rushed to an embankment on what became known as...
  • The Bridge to Hell: How 17,000 Allies were killed or wounded and 20,000 innocents [tr]

    05/27/2018 6:04:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 22 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 27, 2018 | Antony Beevor
    After four humiliating years of occupation, the German retreat through the Netherlands towards the Reich caused an unusual degree of jubilation, disdain and harsh laughter among Dutch civilians. On September 4, 1944, the day after the British Guards Armoured Division drove into Brussels to wild rejoicing, Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands had broadcast to her occupied country from London: ‘Compatriots – You know our liberation is coming.’ Three months after D-Day, the formerly invincible Wehrmacht, which had crushed the Netherlands in the summer of 1940, had been reduced to stealing bicycles to escape the Allied advance. Vehicles requisitioned for the...
  • Tests on skull fragment cast doubt on Adolf Hitler suicide story

    10/01/2009 7:17:05 AM PDT · by COUNTrecount · 51 replies · 2,095+ views
    Bone with bullet hole found by Russians in 1946 came from an unknown woman, not the German leader Tests on skull fragment cast doubt on Adolf Hitler suicide In countless biographies of Adolf Hitler the story of his final hours is recounted in the traditional version: committing suicide with Eva Braun, he took a cyanide pill and then shot himself on 30 April 1945, as the Russians bombarded Berlin. Some historians expressed doubt that the Führer had shot himself, speculating that accounts of Hitler's death had been embellished to present his suicide in a suitably heroic light. But a fragment...
  • Hitler definitely died in 1945, according to new study of his teeth

    05/20/2018 9:08:09 AM PDT · by golux · 71 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 19 May 2018 | R. Mulholland
    French researchers claim to have put an end to conspiracy theories surrounding the death of Adolf Hitler, after a study of his teeth proved he definitely died after taking cyanide and shooting himself in the head in Berlin in 1945. The researchers reached their conclusion after they were given rare access to fragments of Hitler’s teeth which have been held in Moscow since the end of World War II. "The teeth are authentic, there is no possible doubt. Our study proves that Hitler died in 1945," said professor Philippe Charlier. "We can stop all the conspiracy theories about Hitler. He...
  • Richard Overton, oldest living veteran, turns 112

    05/11/2018 7:06:11 AM PDT · by EdnaMode · 8 replies
    KXAN ^ | May 11, 2018 | Chris Davis
    The oldest living World War II veteran and oldest living man in the U.S. turns 112 Friday, and his family and friends are celebrating by inviting everyone to stop by and see him. Richard Overton, born in 1906, still lives in east Austin in the house he built 72 years ago. Overton moved into the house, now on a street named after him, in 1946, and still spends his days on his front porch, smoking cigars and drinking whiskey. "I feel fine every day," Overton told a gaggle of reporters and photographers gathered outside his home on Thursday. "No pain...
  • Antony Beevor says Arnhem was a military disaster doomed from the start to be mission [tr]

    05/11/2018 5:30:09 AM PDT · by C19fan · 16 replies
    UK Daiky Mail ^ | May 11, 2018 | Tony Rennell
    Every time a paratrooper in Britain’s airborne regiments goes to the stores to pick up his parachute as a prelude to going into action, it’s handed over with the same old corny gallows-humour banter — ‘Bring it back if it doesn’t work and we’ll exchange it.’ You could apply the same logic to the Parachute Regiment’s most famous World War II mission: the abortive attempt to capture from the Germans the bridge over the Rhine at the town of Arnhem in the north-east of the Netherlands in the autumn of 1944. It spectacularly did not work — and, once it...
  • Today in Military History: V-E Day, and five Medal of Honor actions

    05/08/2018 7:52:10 AM PDT · by fugazi · 1 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 8, 2018 | Chris Carter
    1864: Union Army forces under the command of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate forces under Gen. Robert E. Lee clash in the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse. The outcome at Spotsylvania Courthouse will be inconclusive and the casualties terribly heavy. In less than two weeks, Grant will again break contact and continue his advance toward Richmond. [...] 1945: V-E Day: The unconditional surrender of German forces signed by Gen. Alfred Jodl at the “little red schoolhouse” (supreme allied headquarters in Reims, France) the previous day becomes official. Although clashes between the Wehrmacht and the Red Army will continue for...
  • Today is V.E. Day: on May 8, 1945, World War 2 ended in Europe

    05/08/2018 5:46:07 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 12 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 05/07/2018 | Harpygoddess
    May 8th is the anniversary of V.E. Day (for "Victory in Europe") in 1945, and commemorates the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany to the Allied forces, ending World War II in Europe. With Adolf Hitler dead by his own hand, German military leaders signed surrender documents at several locations in Europe on May 7, capitulating to each of their victorious foes. Germany’s partner in fascism, Italy, had switched sides in 1943, though many Italians continued to fight alongside their German comrades in Italy. Upon entering the war in December 1941, the United States had agreed on a “Europe first” strategy:...
  • What We Knew: Everyday Life in Nazi Germany

    03/14/2018 10:50:26 AM PDT · by GoldenState_Rose · 48 replies
    Archive.org ^ | 2005 | Eric A. Johnson, Karl-Heinz Reuband
    Difficult as it is to fathom, given most people's conception of dictatorship, most Germans appear to have led happy, productive, even normal lives in the Third Reich. This indicates that a dictatorship can enjoy widespread popularity among the majority even while committing unspeakable crimes against minorities and others. The horrors of the Nazi regime and the Holocaust still present some of the most disturbing questions in modern history: Why did Hitler’s party appeal to millions of Germans, and how entrenched was anti- Semitism among the population? How could anyone claim, after the war, that the genocide of Europe’s Jews was...
  • 73 Years Ago Today the Battle for Okinawa Began. It Was Hell on Earth.

    04/01/2018 8:30:33 PM PDT · by BBell · 98 replies
    http://nationalinterest.org/ ^ | 4/1/18 | Hans A. von Spakovsky
    As we celebrate Easter Sunday and the Jewish Passover, we should keep in our prayers and remembrances the many Americans who fought and sacrificed during that same time 73 years ago in the Battle of Okinawa. The event was Operation Iceberg. It was the bloodiest battle and the largest amphibious assault in the Pacific Theater of World War II. On Easter Sunday, April 1, 1945, the Navy’s Fifth Fleet under Admiral Raymond Spruance attacked the Japanese-held island. They were joined by a British, Canadian, New Zealand, and Australian naval task force and more than 180,000 Army soldiers and Marines. This...
  • WWII Aircraft Carrier found off Australian Coast

    03/16/2018 5:20:45 AM PDT · by w1n1 · 5 replies
    Am Shooting Journal ^ | 3/16/2018 | W Olson
    Searchers from vessel Petrel, owned by billionaire explorer Paul Allen have found the wreckage of the USS Lexington. The aircraft carrier sunk 76 years ago near Australia. The Lexington was critically damaged by Japanese forces during the battle of the Coral Sea on May 8, 1942. "Lexington was on our priority list because she was one of the capital ships that was lost during WWII," said Robert Kraft, director of subsea operations for Allen, in a statement. One of the first US aircraft carriers ever built, the vessel dubbed "Lady Lex" was located at the bottom of the Coral Sea...
  • Broadcast to the American People Announcing the Surrender of Germany - May 8, 1945

    02/24/2018 9:59:50 AM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 6 replies
    Univ of Missouri ^ | May 8, 1945 | Harry S. Truman
    THIS IS a solemn but a glorious hour. I only wish that Franklin D. Roosevelt had lived to witness this day. General Eisenhower informs me that the forces of Germany have surrendered to the United Nations. The flags of freedom fly over all Europe. For this victory, we join in offering our thanks to the Providence which has guided and sustained us through the dark days of adversity. Our rejoicing is sobered and subdued by a supreme consciousness of the terrible price we have paid to rid the world of Hitler and his evil band. Let us not forget, my...
  • History: War hero Wallenberg was executed in Soviet gulag

    02/20/2018 1:34:22 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 12 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Ian Traynor
    A senior Russian official finally admitted that Stalin's secret police shot dead Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who saved tens of thousands of central European Jews from the gas chambers of Auschwitz in 1944 and 1945. For decades the Soviet authorities insisted that Wallenberg had died of a heart attack in 1947 in a Soviet prison, but speculation about his fate grew into a full-blown mystery as gulag inmates surfaced to report sightings of the Swede in Siberia into the 1950s.
  • Today we honor the men of Iwo Jima

    02/19/2018 8:09:54 AM PST · by Oldpuppymax · 55 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 2/19/18 | Kevin "Coach" Collins
    Seventy three years ago today the United States Marine Corps sent waves of teenaged men onto the black foreboding beaches on a Japanese held island called Iwo Jima. Capturing Iwo Jima was essential to the American war against Japan as it offered a place for battered bombers to safely land which would save the lives of hundreds of airmen returning from sorties over Japan in barely flyable planes. The average age of these men was just under nineteen. They knew what was at stake and charged up Iwo’s beaches sometimes straight into enemy machine gun fire that would have stopped...
  • 102-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor's Emotional Reunion with Nephew He Never Knew [Video and Story]

    02/10/2018 1:09:47 PM PST · by beaversmom · 22 replies
    CBN ^ | November 29, 2017
    A 102-year-old Holocaust survivor had thought his entire family had been killed during World War II until he met he recently meet his nephew. Eliahu Pietruszka had fled to the Soviet Union from Warsaw, Poland in 1939 as the war erupted. He was 24 at the time and left behind his parents and twin brothers Volf and Zelig, who were 15. His parents and Zelig were later deported from the Warsaw Ghetto by Adolph Hiter's SS units and were murdered in a Nazi concentration camp. Somehow Volf managed to escape and stayed in touch with Eliahu before he was sent...
  • Francis ‘Jeep’ Sanza, Patton’s driver in World War II, dies in Napa at 99

    02/10/2018 2:24:32 AM PST · by beaversmom · 70 replies
    The San Francisco Chronicle ^ | February 1 2018 | Sam Whiting
    Francis “Jeep” Sanza, a beer truck driver and milkman who got his work experience driving for Gen. George S. Patton during World War II, died Tuesday at his Victorian home in downtown Napa. He was 99. Sanza died in his sleep, said his son Nick Sanza. A framed picture of his former boss Patton was hanging in the dining room until his last day. From the preparations for D-Day, in May 1944, right up through the landing at Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge and the final push into Germany, Sanza was at the wheel of an open air Willys-Overland...
  • Fooling the Nazis: How a Roman hospital invented ‘K Disease’ to save dozens of Jewish lives

    06/28/2016 3:56:33 AM PDT · by NYer · 6 replies
    Aletelial ^ | June 23, 2016 | Jesús Colina
    The name was terrible, but the “K Disease” was not a lethal virus. It was actually the clever invention of Professor Giovanni Borromeo and a religious of the Hospital of the Brothers Hospitallers of Saint John of God, to save the lives of dozens of Jews persecuted by the Nazis during World War II.When the SS entered the Fatebenefratelli hospital located on the Tiber Island in Rome, medical personnel and religious explained to the Germans that behind the doors of two special wards, there were patients suffering from this terrible K Disease, some of whom were terminally ill. The...
  • Legendary American Hero Steve “Spiro” Pisanos Passes Away at 96

    06/13/2016 3:55:39 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 6 replies
    San Diego Air & Space Museum ^ | June 2016 | unknown
    Retired Col. Steve Pisanos, a World War II ace who was decorated by four nations, has died, his family confirmed through the San Diego Air and Space Museum on June 9. Pisanos was 96. Born in Athens, Greece, Pisanos [sometimes spelled Pissanos] came to the United States in 1938. He joined the British Royal Air Force in 1941 and served with an Eagle Squadron until American members were absorbed by the US Army Air Forces 4th Fighter Group. Pisanos was then commissioned a USAAF lieutenant. On May 3, 1942, Pisanos became an American citizen during a ceremony in London, England,...