Keyword: ww1

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  • First World War battlefield in Verdun still a danger

    08/07/2018 4:43:59 PM PDT · by robowombat · 89 replies
    ITV REPORT ^ | 7 August 2018 at 5:50pm | ITV News Europe Editor James Mates
    First World War battlefield in Verdun still a danger with thousands of exploded shells 100 years on Nearly 100 years since the end of the First World War and there are still areas of France unsafe to be visited because of unexploded shells. Some 300,000 soldiers were killed in the Battle of Verdun between France and Germany from February to December 1916. During the onslaught, around six million shells - including many containing mustard gas - were fired by the opposing sides. One million of those failed to explode. Dozens of unexploded shells are unearthed every day. At the end...
  • The Significance of JULY 28 in Serbian-American History / WWI begins...

    07/28/2018 8:43:01 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 11 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | July 28, 2018 | Aleksandra Rebic
    Photo of the Serbian and American flags flying at Serbian National Defense headquarters in Chicago by Aleksandra Rebic July 2018. The Significance of JULY 28 in Serbian-American History / WWI begins and America formally honors Serbia as an Ally, paying tribute to her contributions and sacrifice.Aleksandra's Note: Today, July 28, 2018, marks two important anniversaries. On this date in 1914 Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, thus beginning what would turn into the First World War. On this date in 1918, exactly one century ago, the Serbian flag flew at the White House in Washington, D.C. at the request of American...
  • Exclusive–O’Donnell: Soissons, A Battle You’ve Never Heard of Changed the Course of WWI

    07/10/2018 2:28:07 PM PDT · by huldah1776 · 9 replies
    Breitbart News ^ | June 8, 2017 | Patrick K. O'Donnell
    One hundred years ago, Allied troops readied themselves for a forgotten battle that turned the tide of World War I. Thousands of American servicemen marched through the night to position themselves for a surprise strike against the Germans. A thunderstorm raged the third week of July 1918. Other than the occasional arcs of white-hot lightning, the night was so dark that the American Marines marched with each man holding one hand on the pack of the man in front of him to avoid getting lost. They hadn’t eaten in more than a day, and the men were bone-weary. Still, they...
  • Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War I

    07/03/2018 4:21:36 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 10 replies
    ​Exploring the impact of World War One on British, German and French art Marking the 100 years since the end of World War One, Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One looks at how artists responded to the physical and psychological scars left on Europe. Art was used in many ways in the tumultuous period after the end of the war, from documenting its destructive impact, to the building of public memorials and as a social critique. This fascinating and moving exhibition shows how artists reacted to memories of war in many ways. George Grosz and Otto Dix...
  • The Scottish island that buried America's dead

    05/04/2018 5:14:19 AM PDT · by Winniesboy · 12 replies
    BBC ^ | May 1st 1018 | Glenn Campbell
    It is the whisky-making Scottish island, world famous for its peaty single malts and warm hospitality. But the isle of Islay, in the Inner Hebrides, is now being recognised for an almost forgotten example of huge courage and humanity. A hundred years ago, Islay was on the frontline in the battle at sea during World War One. The island coped with mass casualties from two major troopship disasters just eight months apart. ... Between them, the sinkings of the SS Tuscania in February and HMS Otranto in October, claimed the lives of about 700 men in the last year of...
  • non-Jewish WWI German flying ace who painted a Star of David on plane to annoy Hermann Goering

    03/01/2018 6:13:51 PM PST · by SJackson · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 3-1-18
    The non-Jewish WWI German flying ace who painted a Star of David on his plane just to annoy Hermann Goering after he made Photos showing how a German fighter pilot painted a Jewish Star of David on his First World War plane just to annoy a racist Hermann Goering have come to light. Leutnant Adolf Auer wasn't Jewish himself but was upset when commanding officer Goering made anti semitic remarks about his own wingman, Willi Rosenstein. In revenge, Lt Auer painted the six-pointed Jewish symbol on the side of his Fokker biplane for Goering to see. Lt Auer painted a...
  • Hobbit director Peter Jackson brings WWI back to life in incredible colour photos and new footage

    01/29/2018 9:57:11 PM PST · by beaversmom · 9 replies
    The Sun ^ | January 22, 2018 | Neal Baker
    LORD of the Rings director Sir Peter Jackson is going from Middle Earth to the Western Front — transforming grainy footage of World War I into stunning 3D colour. The documentary announced on Monday is among dozens of artworks commissioned to commemorate 100 years since the end of the 1914-18 war. The New Zealander has restored film from the Imperial War Museum using cutting-edge digital technology and hand colouring. He paired it with archive audio recollections from veterans of the bloody conflict. Sir Peter said the aim is to close the 100-year time gap and show "what it was like...
  • Trench sniping via periscope with the WWI-era Cameron Yaggi 1903

    11/23/2017 10:03:05 AM PST · by Simon Green · 11 replies
    Guns.com ^ | 11/22/17 | Chris Eger
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=40&v=Kr_j_7oXbNE Developed by J.L. Cameron and L.E. Yaggi during the Great War to allow Doughboys to pop shots at the Kaiser’s sauerkraut-eating legions across No Man’s Land, this rare trench rifle is up for auction. Up for bid in Rock Island Auction’s upcoming December Premiere Firearms Auction, this late WWI model (1918-marked barrel) Springfield Armory Model 1903 rifle comes complete with a very hard to find Cameron-Yaggi device, one of several “trench periscope” setups tested for use in that horrible “War to end all wars.” To avoid the Richard Harrow treatment, the idea was that marksmen could use these...
  • The Great Folly of World War I

    11/18/2017 5:48:48 AM PST · by Kaslin · 104 replies
    American Thinker.com ^ | November 18, 2017 | Mike Konrad
    World War I was the greatest folly by far to befall Western civilization. The second greatest folly was America entering the catastrophe. The totalitarian rebounds that followed were consequences that could have been avoided. I am not excusing German militarism, which indeed played a major part. The kaiser was arguably mentally ill, with dreams of martial glory and building an empire. He had ignored the advice of Bismarck, who, though militarist himself, had enough sense to limit his territorial ambitions. Bismarck knew that Germany was surrounded on all sides and that it is not good to provoke rivals. So the...
  • Armistice Day, 2017

    11/11/2017 9:04:20 AM PST · by Jack Black · 7 replies
    Cascade Free Zone ^ | 11/11/2017 | XeroXero
    Today is November 11, Armistice Day. It is the 99th anniversary of the Armistice, which ended the fighting in World War 1. On “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month”—a ceasefire came into effect, ending the war. Over 70 million men, 60 million of them Europeans, were mobilized and fought as soldiers in the war. Over nine million combatants and seven million civilians died as a result of the war. At some point our politicians decided that Armistice Day would become Veterans Day in the USA. While it is excellent that we have a special day...
  • Peace Cross of Bladensburg ruled unconstitutional by appeals court

    10/18/2017 4:18:06 PM PDT · by markomalley · 26 replies
    Washington Times ^ | 10/18/17 | Bradford Richardson
    A three-judge court panel ruled Wednesday that a World War I memorial in the shape of a cross in Bladensburg, Maryland, is unconstitutional, a decision that a legal scholar says could imperil other similar memorials. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit said the 40-foot cross erected 92 years ago violates the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause. “The monument here has the primary effect of endorsing religion and excessively entangles the government in religion,” Judge Stephanie Thacker wrote for the majority. “The Latin cross is the core symbol of Christianity. And here, it is 40...
  • Hunt for Family of First World War Hero Honoured 100 Years After Passchendaele

    10/07/2017 2:07:37 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 3 replies
    The Herald (Scotland) ^ | 6th October | Colin McNeill
    A search has been launched to find relatives of a soldier awarded the Victoria Cross for bravery during the Battle of Passchendaele in the First World War. Officials hope to have family members present at a ceremony to honour the bravery of Robert Shankland, which will take place in Ayr on October 26, 100 years since the heroic acts took place. Mr Shankland was born on October 10, 1887 at 6 Gordon Terrace in the South Ayrshire town and emigrated to Canada in 1911. At the outbreak of the First World War he enlisted and returned to Europe as part...
  • German WW-1 U-boat found off Belgian coast

    09/19/2017 8:23:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    BBC ^ | 09-19-2017 | Staff
    The wreck of a German submarine that sank during World War One has been found in the North Sea and officials believe 23 bodies may be inside it. The type UB-II submarine is said to be in good condition, lying at a depth of 30m (100ft) off the Belgian coast. "The submarine is in such good condition that we reckon all the bodies are still on board," said West Flanders Governor Carl Decaluwé. The vessel is thought to have been sunk by a mine. Mr Decaluwé told reporters on Tuesday that the location of the wreck was being kept under...
  • Back in the Trenches – Ithaca M37 Trench Gun

    09/13/2017 10:22:17 AM PDT · by w1n1 · 27 replies
    Am Shooting Journal ^ | 9/13/2017 | Frank Jardim
    The Army’s best combat pump shotgun is back: Inland’s reissue of Ithaca’s M37 Trench Gun.Two top-shelf Ohio-based firearms manufacturers have partnered to bring collectors and shooters a fine reissue – I hesitate to call it a replica – of the vintage U.S. Army Ithaca M37 Trench Gun. This retro military model is made by the Upper Sandusky-based Ithaca Gun Company for their Dayton neighbor, Inland Manufacturing. The latter is best known for their excellent reproductions of World War II M1 carbines. It was during World War I that you might say the Army got serious about shotguns. It was, after...
  • See No Evil? Then it will take you by surprise.

    07/26/2017 7:57:40 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    City Journal ^ | Summer, 2017 | Myron Magnet
    Incredibly, it wasn’t until I was 19 that I learned that there had been a Holocaust. My hyper-assimilated, New England Jewish family and friends looked only to the present and future. We focused on the polio vaccine that promised to banish the iron lungs that had been our childhood terror. We trusted in the United Nations, whose gleaming buildings my father took me to see when they were brand-new, and from which I came away with hopeful admiration—mixed, however, with a vague sense, which I couldn’t have put into words then, that perhaps an enterprise housed in architecture so grandiosely...
  • A mother's solace: A letter from a World War I enemy

    06/03/2017 8:30:49 PM PDT · by buckalfa · 19 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | April 2O, 2015 | Patrick OGran
    In 1922, four years after her American son was killed in action in World War I, Sallie Maxwell Bennett received a letter from Emil Merkelbach, a German officer who had fought against her son in the battle that ended his life. "You will look upon my writing, no doubt, as something unusual, and rightly so, for it is indeed not exactly usual for a former enemy of his own accord to report about his opponent in the World War. I was myself a German officer in the World War." Emil Merkelbach was the leader of a German balloon squadron stationed...
  • Review: ‘Wonder Woman’ film and star live up to the name

    05/29/2017 10:27:37 PM PDT · by Bratch · 25 replies
    AP via The Washington Times ^ | May 30, 2017 | LINDSEY BAHR
    “Wonder Woman ” has been the subject of so much superfluous fuss, it’d be easy to forget that behind all of the hand-wringing and both symbolic and real pressure to succeed there’s actually a movie meant to entertain. Yet, like the heroine at its center, “Wonder Woman” the movie rises with powerful grace above the noise. It’s not perfect, but it’s often good, sometimes great and exceptionally re-watchable. Director Patty Jenkins’ film is so threaded with sincerity and goodness it’s a wonder how it got past the pugnacious minds responsible for what’s come before. “Wonder Woman” evokes not only the...
  • Reminder of when Hollywood produced heroes

    05/29/2017 10:34:29 AM PDT · by LS · 40 replies
    Hardly anyone thinks of "heroes" when you say "Hollywood" today. But not long ago, most of Hollywood's leading men--or those who would later go on to be stars---fought and many died in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Of course Jimmy Stewart always is among the first mentioned, flying missions in B-24s over Europe and remaining in the Air Force Reserve after the war to become a general. But did you know these stars also served in the USAAF? Charles Bronson, Gene Autry, Gene Roddenberry, Burgess Meredith, Cameron Mitchell, Kevin McCarthy, Dale Robertson, George (Superman) Reeves, Jackie Coogan (gliders), Martin...
  • Today in U.S. military history: Leroy Petry's Medal of Honor, and the 1st flight of the Black Widow

    05/26/2017 6:35:39 AM PDT · by fugazi · 6 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 26, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1917: U.S. Army Gen. John Joseph “Black Jack” Pershing is named commander-in-chief of the American Expeditionary Force, which is destined for European combat the following year. 1942: The Northrop P-61 “Black Widow” night fighter makes its first flight. The twin-boom P-61 is the first aircraft to carry radar and the U.S. military’s first night fighter. The warplane saw service in both the Atlantic and Pacific Theaters, and is widely believed to be credited with the last “kill” of an enemy aircraft in World War II, when a Japanese “Tojo” fighter pilot flies into the water while attempting to evade a...
  • 100 Years On, the Story of the Norfolk Fishermen Who Took on the Austro-Hungarian Navy

    05/14/2017 11:13:27 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    Eastern Daily Press ^ | 14 May 2017 | Steve Snelling
    John Turner was an unlikely hero in an improbable battle. A century after a little-known naval clash in which armed British drifters fought Austrian cruisers, Steve Snelling salutes the magnificent courage of a Norfolk fisherman turned man o’ war. In a war of industrialised slaughter the forlorn and all-but forgotten clash between two ludicrously ill-matched naval armadas off the coast of Italy a century ago was, on the face of it, an unlikely headline-grabber. Compared to the titanic struggles taking place on the western front, the David and Goliath encounter between Austrian battleships and a force of British fishing boats...