Keyword: ww1

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  • German WW-1 U-boat found off Belgian coast

    09/19/2017 8:23:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    BBC ^ | 09-19-2017 | Staff
    The wreck of a German submarine that sank during World War One has been found in the North Sea and officials believe 23 bodies may be inside it. The type UB-II submarine is said to be in good condition, lying at a depth of 30m (100ft) off the Belgian coast. "The submarine is in such good condition that we reckon all the bodies are still on board," said West Flanders Governor Carl Decaluwé. The vessel is thought to have been sunk by a mine. Mr Decaluwé told reporters on Tuesday that the location of the wreck was being kept under...
  • Back in the Trenches – Ithaca M37 Trench Gun

    09/13/2017 10:22:17 AM PDT · by w1n1 · 27 replies
    Am Shooting Journal ^ | 9/13/2017 | Frank Jardim
    The Army’s best combat pump shotgun is back: Inland’s reissue of Ithaca’s M37 Trench Gun.Two top-shelf Ohio-based firearms manufacturers have partnered to bring collectors and shooters a fine reissue – I hesitate to call it a replica – of the vintage U.S. Army Ithaca M37 Trench Gun. This retro military model is made by the Upper Sandusky-based Ithaca Gun Company for their Dayton neighbor, Inland Manufacturing. The latter is best known for their excellent reproductions of World War II M1 carbines. It was during World War I that you might say the Army got serious about shotguns. It was, after...
  • See No Evil? Then it will take you by surprise.

    07/26/2017 7:57:40 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    City Journal ^ | Summer, 2017 | Myron Magnet
    Incredibly, it wasn’t until I was 19 that I learned that there had been a Holocaust. My hyper-assimilated, New England Jewish family and friends looked only to the present and future. We focused on the polio vaccine that promised to banish the iron lungs that had been our childhood terror. We trusted in the United Nations, whose gleaming buildings my father took me to see when they were brand-new, and from which I came away with hopeful admiration—mixed, however, with a vague sense, which I couldn’t have put into words then, that perhaps an enterprise housed in architecture so grandiosely...
  • A mother's solace: A letter from a World War I enemy

    06/03/2017 8:30:49 PM PDT · by buckalfa · 19 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | April 2O, 2015 | Patrick OGran
    In 1922, four years after her American son was killed in action in World War I, Sallie Maxwell Bennett received a letter from Emil Merkelbach, a German officer who had fought against her son in the battle that ended his life. "You will look upon my writing, no doubt, as something unusual, and rightly so, for it is indeed not exactly usual for a former enemy of his own accord to report about his opponent in the World War. I was myself a German officer in the World War." Emil Merkelbach was the leader of a German balloon squadron stationed...
  • Review: ‘Wonder Woman’ film and star live up to the name

    05/29/2017 10:27:37 PM PDT · by Bratch · 25 replies
    AP via The Washington Times ^ | May 30, 2017 | LINDSEY BAHR
    “Wonder Woman ” has been the subject of so much superfluous fuss, it’d be easy to forget that behind all of the hand-wringing and both symbolic and real pressure to succeed there’s actually a movie meant to entertain. Yet, like the heroine at its center, “Wonder Woman” the movie rises with powerful grace above the noise. It’s not perfect, but it’s often good, sometimes great and exceptionally re-watchable. Director Patty Jenkins’ film is so threaded with sincerity and goodness it’s a wonder how it got past the pugnacious minds responsible for what’s come before. “Wonder Woman” evokes not only the...
  • Reminder of when Hollywood produced heroes

    05/29/2017 10:34:29 AM PDT · by LS · 40 replies
    Hardly anyone thinks of "heroes" when you say "Hollywood" today. But not long ago, most of Hollywood's leading men--or those who would later go on to be stars---fought and many died in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. Of course Jimmy Stewart always is among the first mentioned, flying missions in B-24s over Europe and remaining in the Air Force Reserve after the war to become a general. But did you know these stars also served in the USAAF? Charles Bronson, Gene Autry, Gene Roddenberry, Burgess Meredith, Cameron Mitchell, Kevin McCarthy, Dale Robertson, George (Superman) Reeves, Jackie Coogan (gliders), Martin...
  • Today in U.S. military history: Leroy Petry's Medal of Honor, and the 1st flight of the Black Widow

    05/26/2017 6:35:39 AM PDT · by fugazi · 6 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 26, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1917: U.S. Army Gen. John Joseph “Black Jack” Pershing is named commander-in-chief of the American Expeditionary Force, which is destined for European combat the following year. 1942: The Northrop P-61 “Black Widow” night fighter makes its first flight. The twin-boom P-61 is the first aircraft to carry radar and the U.S. military’s first night fighter. The warplane saw service in both the Atlantic and Pacific Theaters, and is widely believed to be credited with the last “kill” of an enemy aircraft in World War II, when a Japanese “Tojo” fighter pilot flies into the water while attempting to evade a...
  • 100 Years On, the Story of the Norfolk Fishermen Who Took on the Austro-Hungarian Navy

    05/14/2017 11:13:27 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    Eastern Daily Press ^ | 14 May 2017 | Steve Snelling
    John Turner was an unlikely hero in an improbable battle. A century after a little-known naval clash in which armed British drifters fought Austrian cruisers, Steve Snelling salutes the magnificent courage of a Norfolk fisherman turned man o’ war. In a war of industrialised slaughter the forlorn and all-but forgotten clash between two ludicrously ill-matched naval armadas off the coast of Italy a century ago was, on the face of it, an unlikely headline-grabber. Compared to the titanic struggles taking place on the western front, the David and Goliath encounter between Austrian battleships and a force of British fishing boats...
  • Did the Obama Administration Know that Syria Still had Chemical Weapons?

    04/08/2017 5:02:13 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 41 replies
    PJ Media ^ | April 8, 2017 | Rick Moran
    Sean Keeley of The American Interest noticed a curious statement from National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster when he briefed reporters on the Syrian strike. And the one thing that I will tell you though, there was an effort to minimize – to minimize risk to third-country nationals at that airport – I think you read Russians from that – but that – and we took great pains to try to avoid that. […] And then there were also measures put in place to avoid hitting what we believe is a storage of sarin gas, so that that would not be ignited...
  • Centennial Commemoration of the U.S. Entry into World War I [April 6th, 1917]

    04/05/2017 4:28:34 PM PDT · by SES1066 · 19 replies
    On April 6, 1917, the United States officially entered World War I, a war that changed the nation and the world forever. On April 6, 2017, thousands in attendance, as well as those watching video across the nation and around the world, will see the United States commemorate this turning point in our nation’s and the world’s history with the “In Sacrifice for Liberty and Peace: Centennial Commemoration of the U.S. Entry into World War I” ceremony, hosted by the United States World War One Centennial Commission at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri.
  • The First Test Of WW1 Mark VIII Tank (1918) HD

    12/28/2016 1:53:09 PM PST · by BBell · 30 replies
    Here we see video of the first time the Mark VIII tank from World War 1 is being tested and rolled out for the military to consider whether or not to fund its mass production. More information is in the video text slides.
  • France celebrates centennial of an American's July 4 sacrifice

    07/03/2016 11:42:32 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 18 replies
    cbsnews.com ^ | July 3, 2016 | AP
    BELLOY-EN-SANTERRE, France - In the end, Alan Seeger's bones could no longer be distinguished from those of his Foreign Legion comrades who had fallen alongside him in one of the most brutal battles of World War I. United across nations, it was the glorious death that he craved. Seeger - an American poet, romantic and soldier - died on that most American of days, July 4th, a century ago Monday. Barely 28, he was already fighting for a global, common cause that bound dozens of countries together at a time when the United States was still a bystander, reluctant to...
  • How J.R.R. Tolkien Found Mordor on the Western Front

    07/01/2016 5:10:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    NY Times ^ | June 30, 2016 | Joseph Laconte
    IN the summer of 1916, a young Oxford academic embarked for France as a second lieutenant in the British Expeditionary Force. The Great War, as World War I was known, was only half-done, but already its industrial carnage had no parallel in European history. “Junior officers were being killed off, a dozen a minute,” recalled J. R. R. Tolkien. “Parting from my wife,” he wrote, doubting that he would survive the trenches, “was like a death.”
  • German WW1 destroyers found in Whale Island mud

    04/18/2016 7:30:28 AM PDT · by artichokegrower · 12 replies
    Navy News ^ | 13 April 2016
    A tiny drone has scanned the wrecks of two German WW1 warships – forgotten and mostly buried by the sludge and mud at the southern end of Whale Island. Marine archeologists hope to bring the two vessels - one a veteran of Jutland - back to life in 3D computer model form as part of centennial commemorations of the Great War.
  • Battle Without End: The casualties of Verdun

    03/04/2016 8:33:58 AM PST · by C19fan · 40 replies
    Weekly Standard ^ | March 14, 2016 | Geoffrey Norman
    There is something hard, cold, and brutal about the structure. It looks like a concrete airplane hangar and rising above it is what is called the “Lantern of the Dead." The shape suggests, appropriately, an artillery shell. When you walk around the outside of the building you find small windows, and when you look through them what you see are bones. Human bones and skulls. Piles of them. They are the remains of more than 130,000 men who were killed here and whose bodies could not be recovered or identified and so remained in the mud, blown apart again and...
  • 100 Years Ago Today: Battle of Verdun starts

    02/21/2016 7:38:14 PM PST · by abishai · 41 replies
    Centenary News ^ | February 21, 2016
    A massive artillery bombardment on the morning of February 21st 1916 signalled the start of the German attack on Verdun, the longest single battle of the First World War. More than 1,200 guns opened fire before German troops began their assault on fortifications of major symbolic inportance to France. Even by the standards of the Great War, the Battle of Verdun was a particularly brutal campaign of attrition, fuelled by the determination of both sides not to give way as the struggle wore on. The battle was to last 300 days, almost until Christmas, on a narrow front stretching no...
  • British accuse Australia of banning them from WWI Battle of Fromelles centenary commemoration

    02/05/2016 2:40:36 PM PST · by naturalman1975 · 24 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 5th February 2016 | Sophie Aubrey
    THE relatives of slain British soldiers have accused the Department of Veterans' Affairs of banning them from attending centenary commemorations for a catastrophic WWI battle that killed thousands of Australian soldiers. The Battle of Fromelles is among Australia's bloodiest military encounters and the brutal loss has long been blamed on a disastrous incompetence of British military strategy. A special service to mark the battle's 100th anniversary is to take place on July 19 this year at the Pheasant Wood military cemetery in Fromelles, northern France. The slaughter is viewed by historians as the darkest 24 hours in the Australia's history...
  • The West's Great Folly: Believing Old Empires Had Gone 'Progressive,' Too

    01/14/2016 6:01:28 PM PST · by Kaslin · 4 replies
    PJ Media ^ | January 14, 2016 | Michael Gurfinkel
    By the end of the 19th century, it was commonly held that four European powers possessed great foreign services: the Habsburg Monarchy (known after 1867 as Austria-Hungary or the "Double Monarchy"), the Ottoman Empire, the Holy See, and Russia.Retrospectively, it appears that there was much truth about that opinion. Presently, we should take notice that these powers -- now treated by "progressive" discourse as expired, dusty tales no longer relevant to our modern conflicts -- are in fact pivotal instruments in world politics today.Agreed, we can preclude the Habsburg service, arguably the most prestigious of all four in 1914, which...
  • The FRiday Night Movie - Paths of Glory (1957)

    11/06/2015 7:01:05 PM PST · by DemforBush · 10 replies
    Youtube ^ | N/A | N/A
    A WW1 classic tonight. Regiment 701 of the French Army is ordered to make a near-suicidal attack against a heavily fortified German position known as the "Ant Hill." When the attack fails, three soldiers are selected for court-martial and execution for cowardice. Only Colonel Dax (Kirk Douglas) stands between the men and the firing squad. Directed by Stanley Kubrick. Based on the real life WW1 court-martials of the Souain Corporal Affair. HD video, variable film speed (see post).
  • Henry Henley Chapman, USMA Class of 1917, Military Family dating back to the Revolution.

    10/22/2015 12:26:25 PM PDT · by robowombat · 2 replies
    Henry Henley Chapman No. 5733, Class of April 20, 1917. Killed in action September 29, 1918, at Cambria, France, aged 24 years. Captain Henry Henley Chapman, of the class of 1917, U. S. M. A., was killed in action, in France, September 29th,. 1918. He fell on the field of honor while leading his men over the top in the first wave of the great attack of the Thirtieth Division that broke the Hindenberg line at Bellicourt, about four miles north of St. Quentin, and where the St. Quentin Canal enters the tunnel. The 30th was operating with the 4th...