Keyword: ww1

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  • Israel Breaking: IDF Reinforces Gaza Border, Massive Rocket Barrage Follows 'Botched' Operation...

    11/13/2018 2:27:13 AM PST · by Nextrush · 29 replies
    Nextrush Free ^ | 11/13/2018 | Nextrush/Self
    It seemed like things were going to quiet down in Gaza last week with the delivery of 15 million dollars in cash from Qatar in multiple suitcases. The "payoff" money was designed to pacify Gaza and help calm things down between Israel and the militant group Hamas which has maintained steady pressure on Israel with everything from occasional rocket barrages to constant incendiary kites to mass protests at the border fences forcing Israeli snipers to open fire. But suddenly on Sunday night all hell broke loose. IDF soliders were operating inside Gaza using civilian vehicles backed by air support, tanks...
  • All quiet on the Western Front garden! WWI expert turns his yard into trench system(trunc)

    11/19/2018 5:47:38 PM PST · by dynachrome · 18 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 11-11-18 | STEPHANIE LINNING
    Andrew Robertshaw, 58, built the 60ft trench with 30 volunteers in a field behind his former home in Surrey Spent a month shifting 200 tons of earth to build dugout, which features officers' mess and soldiers' quarters Hopes to teach people more about the horrific living conditions endured by British troops during the Great War The historian said that films and TV shows often offer a simplistic and inaccurate view of life on the front line Hosts open days and educational visits to the trench, which was designed based on war time diary descriptions
  • The M1917 Enfield: America's WWI Workhorse

    11/18/2018 5:34:43 PM PST · by Rummyfan · 25 replies
    Shooting Illustrated ^ | 11 Nov 2018 | Wiley Clapp
    As firearms go, the M1917 Enfield was not the handsomest ever issued to a U.S. Soldier. It’s true that no one ever guaranteed our guys were going to get good-looking guns, but that is exactly what happened at several points in history. The M1 Carbine—World War II’s “War Baby”—was a gun that just about everyone felt was a good one. The Colt Peacemaker of 1873 had a wonderful set of contours that evolved into the classic cowboy six-shooter. But the gun at hand was a military service rifle that wasn’t just good, but rather very good. Against its contemporaries—Mauser, Lee-Enfield,...
  • Trump’s rain decision casts dark clouds over his Paris trip

    11/11/2018 12:44:55 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 141 replies
    Pollutico ^ | 11/11/2018 08:24 AM EST | NANCY COOK
    PARIS — President Donald Trump’s decision to cancel his visit to an American military cemetery outside of Paris threatened to overshadow his trip here, as government officials, historians and fellow Republicans hammered him for more than 24 hours for that move. “President@realDonaldTrump a no-show because of raindrops? Those veterans the president didn’t bother to honor fought in the rain, in the mud, in the snow — & many died in trenches for the cause of freedom. Rain didn’t stop them & it shouldn’t have stopped an American president,” wrote former Secretary of State John Kerry, a veteran of the Vietnam...
  • From godlessness to ruthlessness: Religion and the First World War

    11/11/2018 5:43:39 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 14 replies
    Alexander Solzhenitsyn had once asked why, in 1914, a Europe "bursting with health and abundance" had "fallen into a rage of self-mutilation"; and the Russian writer offered the same explanation as he did for all the disasters of the early 20th century: man had "forgotten God". Anyone will agree that there was a decline in the importance of religion during and after the first world war. Theocratically-based regimes, notably the Russian and Ottoman empires, were replaced by secular ones. In western Europe, Protestant and Catholic clergy struggled to explain the seemingly senseless horrors of the war to their flock. It...
  • Kerry slams Trump for canceling attendance at WWI memorial

    11/11/2018 4:04:45 AM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 66 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 11/11/18
    US President Donald Trump was forced to cancel his attendance on Saturday at a commemoration in France for US soldiers and marines killed in World War I because rain made it impossible to arrange transport. “[The attendance of the president and first lady] has been canceled due to scheduling and logistical difficulties caused by the weather,” the White House said according to Reuters, adding that Chief of Staff John Kelly, who is a former general, went instead. While the president was scheduled to attend the ceremony at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery in Belleau, rain and low clouds prevented his helicopter...
  • PETER HITCHENS: Soldiers? No, Brtiain lost 700,000 poets, teachers, inventors...and fathers

    11/10/2018 6:39:56 PM PST · by Nextrush · 47 replies
    DailyMail.com ^ | 11/10/2018 | Peter Hitchens
    What do you think about during the two minutes silence? I used to think of men at war, and hear in my head the shouts and the clash of arms. Now I see a narrow street of small houses at dusk. A young man in army uniform is embracing his wife and little children in a lighted doorway. He will not return. I recently learned that, on the first day of commemoration, in 1919, the silence was often far from silent. In many places, when the traffic and the factories stopped, the sound of uncontrollable weeping could be heard in...
  • Tens of thousands of people bring London to a halt to see tribute to Brits killed in the First [tr]

    11/10/2018 5:25:06 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | November 9, 2018 | Faith Ridler and Leigh Mcmanus
    Tens of thousands of people gathered at the Tower of London tonight as time runs out to view the 10,000 torches installed in memory of those killed in the First Word War. Queues stretched more than 50 yards back from the '90 minutes wait' sign at Tower Bridge as crowds waited to view the touching tribute. The installation, Beyond the Deepening Shadow, will be open to the public until Remembrance Sunday on November 11. The Queen and senior members of the Royal Family are due to attend the Festival of Remembrance at London's Royal Albert Hall on Saturday night as...
  • World War I: Why?

    11/09/2018 12:08:07 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 64 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | John Keegan, James L. Swanson
    The Great War of 1914-1918 was the defining event of our time: a lost generation of millions dead or maimed; mournful widows and orphans; empires toppled and nations shattered; Western civilization damaged; vast treasures sacrificed. And in war's aftermath, democracies stillborn and totalitarianism and vengeance enthroned. How did it happen? Keegan, despite his vast expertise, confesses that even when one knows what happened, it is difficult to explain why. "The First World War is a mystery. Its origins are mysterious. So is its course. Why did a prosperous continent, at the height of its success as a source and agent...
  • Today in US military history: Jihad at Fort Hood and 2 Roosevelts lead attack in 'No Man's Land'

    11/05/2018 8:20:07 AM PST · by fugazi · 11 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Nov. 5, 2018 | Chris Carter
    Today's post is in honor of Sgt. 1st Class Jose A. Rivera, who was killed in action on this day in 2003 in Mumuhdyah, Iraq. The 34-year-old native of Bayamon, Puerto Rico was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment. 1862: Realizing an army led by Gen. George McClellan would never defeat the Confederates, Pres. Abraham Lincoln removes the cautious Army of the Potomac commander, choosing Gen. Ambrose Burnside as his replacement. Two years and three days later, Lincoln would defeat McClellan - a Democrat - in the 1864 presidential election. 1915: Lt. Commander Henry...
  • Tiny Pakistan village which sent EVERY able-bodied man to fight in World War One [tr]

    10/26/2018 6:32:56 AM PDT · by C19fan · 3 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 26, 2018 | Cait Kelly
    A nineteenth century cannon sits at the entrance of a Pakistani village, the huge monument casts a striking silhouette against the dust and cobble alleyways of the small agricultural village. Nestled in the rocky hills of Punjab's salt ranges, blasted by heat in the summer, the village of Dulmial is a far cry from the freezing mud of the Flanders trenches. Locally, Dulmial is now known simply as the 'village with the gun' but when the man who uncovered the horrors, and heroics that the cannon symbolized, first saw it, it meant nothing to him, The Telegraph reports.
  • Student rep sparks outrage after vowing to tear down a 'mural of white men' honouring those [tr]

    10/25/2018 7:25:14 AM PDT · by C19fan · 25 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 25, 2018 | Richard Spillett
    The president of a university students' union has been criticised for saying a mural in memory of First World War soldiers should be 'painted over' because it displays only 'white men'. Emily Dawes, the head of the University of Southampton Students' Union, provoked outrage when she referred to the university's Rotherstein Mural as a 'mural of white men' and called for it to be taken down. She tweeted: 'Mark my words - we're taking down the mural of white men in the uni Senate room, even if I have to paint over it myself.' Both she and the students' union...
  • Field Marshal Douglas Haig would have let Germany win, biography says

    11/10/2008 11:14:39 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 31 replies · 374+ views
    The Times ^ | 11/11/2008 | Ben Hoyle
    He is the most pilloried military leader in British history, caricatured as a butcher and a bungler who sent hundreds of thousands of men over the top to their deaths. Now a new biography pins a further damning indictment on Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig. Late in the final year of the First World War, it argues, he was pushing for a peace that would have left Germany as the real winner of the war. According to Dr J. P. Harris, senior lecturer in War Studies at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, Haig was not quite the uncaring monster of...
  • America’s Biggest Battle, 100 Years On

    09/26/2018 10:15:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 10 replies
    National Review ^ | September 16, 2018 | Dan McLauhlin
    One hundred years ago this morning, at 5:30 a.m. Central European Time, the 1.2 million-man American Expeditionary Force launched all of its available combat strength into the largest and arguably the bloodiest battle in American history: the six-week Meuse-Argonne offensive that continued through the armistice at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918. The horrific and protracted battle brought a decisive end to the first war in which Americans fought on European soil. Though it was filled with then-famous incidents and notable Americans, the ordeal of the Meuse-Argonne is far less remembered today than...
  • First World War battlefield in Verdun still a danger

    08/07/2018 4:43:59 PM PDT · by robowombat · 95 replies
    ITV REPORT ^ | 7 August 2018 at 5:50pm | ITV News Europe Editor James Mates
    First World War battlefield in Verdun still a danger with thousands of exploded shells 100 years on Nearly 100 years since the end of the First World War and there are still areas of France unsafe to be visited because of unexploded shells. Some 300,000 soldiers were killed in the Battle of Verdun between France and Germany from February to December 1916. During the onslaught, around six million shells - including many containing mustard gas - were fired by the opposing sides. One million of those failed to explode. Dozens of unexploded shells are unearthed every day. At the end...
  • The Significance of JULY 28 in Serbian-American History / WWI begins...

    07/28/2018 8:43:01 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 11 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | July 28, 2018 | Aleksandra Rebic
    Photo of the Serbian and American flags flying at Serbian National Defense headquarters in Chicago by Aleksandra Rebic July 2018. The Significance of JULY 28 in Serbian-American History / WWI begins and America formally honors Serbia as an Ally, paying tribute to her contributions and sacrifice.Aleksandra's Note: Today, July 28, 2018, marks two important anniversaries. On this date in 1914 Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, thus beginning what would turn into the First World War. On this date in 1918, exactly one century ago, the Serbian flag flew at the White House in Washington, D.C. at the request of American...
  • Exclusive–O’Donnell: Soissons, A Battle You’ve Never Heard of Changed the Course of WWI

    07/10/2018 2:28:07 PM PDT · by huldah1776 · 9 replies
    Breitbart News ^ | June 8, 2017 | Patrick K. O'Donnell
    One hundred years ago, Allied troops readied themselves for a forgotten battle that turned the tide of World War I. Thousands of American servicemen marched through the night to position themselves for a surprise strike against the Germans. A thunderstorm raged the third week of July 1918. Other than the occasional arcs of white-hot lightning, the night was so dark that the American Marines marched with each man holding one hand on the pack of the man in front of him to avoid getting lost. They hadn’t eaten in more than a day, and the men were bone-weary. Still, they...
  • Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War I

    07/03/2018 4:21:36 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 10 replies
    ​Exploring the impact of World War One on British, German and French art Marking the 100 years since the end of World War One, Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One looks at how artists responded to the physical and psychological scars left on Europe. Art was used in many ways in the tumultuous period after the end of the war, from documenting its destructive impact, to the building of public memorials and as a social critique. This fascinating and moving exhibition shows how artists reacted to memories of war in many ways. George Grosz and Otto Dix...
  • The Scottish island that buried America's dead

    05/04/2018 5:14:19 AM PDT · by Winniesboy · 12 replies
    BBC ^ | May 1st 1018 | Glenn Campbell
    It is the whisky-making Scottish island, world famous for its peaty single malts and warm hospitality. But the isle of Islay, in the Inner Hebrides, is now being recognised for an almost forgotten example of huge courage and humanity. A hundred years ago, Islay was on the frontline in the battle at sea during World War One. The island coped with mass casualties from two major troopship disasters just eight months apart. ... Between them, the sinkings of the SS Tuscania in February and HMS Otranto in October, claimed the lives of about 700 men in the last year of...
  • non-Jewish WWI German flying ace who painted a Star of David on plane to annoy Hermann Goering

    03/01/2018 6:13:51 PM PST · by SJackson · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 3-1-18
    The non-Jewish WWI German flying ace who painted a Star of David on his plane just to annoy Hermann Goering after he made Photos showing how a German fighter pilot painted a Jewish Star of David on his First World War plane just to annoy a racist Hermann Goering have come to light. Leutnant Adolf Auer wasn't Jewish himself but was upset when commanding officer Goering made anti semitic remarks about his own wingman, Willi Rosenstein. In revenge, Lt Auer painted the six-pointed Jewish symbol on the side of his Fokker biplane for Goering to see. Lt Auer painted a...