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Keyword: ww1

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  • First World War centenary: the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, as it happened (101 years ago)

    06/28/2015 12:56:45 PM PDT · by aquila48 · 18 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | June 28, 2014 | Richard Preston
    On Sunday June 28 1914 in Sarajevo, Gavrilo Princip fired the shot that killed the Archduke and started the train of events that led to global war. Here is a step by step account of how the dramatic day unfolded... Our journey starts with an extremely promising omen. Here our car burns, and down there they will throw bombs at us. Archduke Franz Ferdinand comments wryly on the fact that his journey to Bosnia in June 1914 begins with his car overheating The Archduke: Franz Ferdinand, the bumptious, little-loved 51-year-old nephew of the ailing Emperor Franz Joseph, was heir presumptive...
  • The Meaning of Belleau Wood

    06/26/2015 6:44:55 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 56 replies
    Real Clear Defense ^ | June 26, 2015 | By Shawn Callahan
    To really understand Marines, you need to know something about Belleau Wood. On June 6, 1918, the 4th Marine Brigade began its offensive into Belleau Wood in France, marking arguably the most significant day in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps. More Marines died that day than in the 143 years of Marine Corps history that had preceded it — combined. But it is not the magnitude of that sacrifice, or even the military objectives that were accomplished, that define the significance of that day; rather, it was the cultural impact that event had on the Marine Corps. The Marines did...
  • Blueprint for Armageddon

    06/24/2015 10:43:16 AM PDT · by Sopater · 5 replies
    The planet hadnt seen a major war between all the Great Powers since the downfall of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. But 99 years later the dam breaks and a Pandoras Box of violence engulfs the planet.
  • Biden: In WW1, America Should Have Bombed Our Own Steel Mills

    06/17/2015 1:17:10 PM PDT · by Zakeet · 46 replies
    Grabien ^ | June 17, 2015
    JOE BIDEN: "You know it reminds me, I remember back in 1973, I came from Pennsylvania and steel and coal were a big deal, particularly steel. I remember making a speech to the United Steel Workers sponsored by US Steel. There were 3,000 people there and I was a young Senator. Come out and I say, 'you know in World War I we made a mistake, and I was being not unusually Biden controversial. And, I said we made a mistake, we bombed the wrong steel mills. And, I went on to point out that there'd been virtually no innovation...
  • In Flanders Fields

    05/23/2015 10:31:16 AM PDT · by Biggirl · 10 replies
    Arlingtoncemetery.net ^ | May 23, 2015 | Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD
    In Flanders Fields By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918) Canadian Army "In Flanders Fields the poppies blow Between the crosses row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We...
  • 19 May: Remembering Pontian genocide

    05/17/2015 6:33:17 PM PDT · by bad company · 9 replies
    http://www.thetoc.gr ^ | 19 May. 14 | Euthimis Tsiliopoulos
    On 19 may, Hellenism commemorates the extermination of 353,000 Pontian Greeks killed during a genocide. During the years 1914-1923, in the 1st World War, the Greek minority of the Ottoman Empire, the Republic of Turkey's predecessor, were removed from Western Anatolia. An estimated 350 thousands Greeks were killed between 1913-1922, ending thousands of years of Hellenic civilization in Asia Minor. Pontian and Anatolian Greeks were victims of broader Turkish genocide project at all Christian minorities in the Ottoman Empire. More than 3.5 million Greeks, Assyrians and Armenians were killed under the regimes of the Young Turks and of Mustafa Kemal....
  • In WWI, Alvin York Captured 132 German Soldiers Pretty Much Single Handed

    03/13/2015 2:02:20 PM PDT · by daniel1212 · 54 replies
    Vacca Foeda Media ^ | Jan. 24, 1010 | Daven Hiskey
    In WWI Alvin York almost single handedly captured 132 German soldiers using nothing but a rifle and a pistol, while the German soldiers having among them 32 machine guns along with rifles and pistols and the advantage of being above him in the biggest of the forays. And did I mention York was out in the open during the largest gun fight? Ya, when the Germans attacked they pretty much mowed down almost the entire unit that York was with, including Yorks commanding officer, which put him in charge. The other soldiers left from the original group of 17, were...
  • The cat who was shot for treason in the first world war.

    12/31/2014 10:42:14 AM PST · by marthemaria · 19 replies
    A British soldier shakes hands with a kitten on a snowy bank, Neulette, 1917. In the Christmas truce film Joyeux Nol, a cat runs back and forth between the enemy trenches to soldiers that feed it. One names the cat Felix and the other Nestor, and when the two meet in No Mans Land during thet ruce, a sweet argument ensues between the two men over whose cat it is and what is, in fact, its name. The director of the film, Carion, drew on a real life story of a cat who did this during the truce and was...
  • PHOTOS: Soldiers in Afghanistan play soccer in memory of World War One truce

    12/25/2014 5:47:10 AM PST · by huldah1776 · 8 replies
    Reditt.com ^ | December 25, 2014 | NA
    "We were just going to fire on them when we saw they had no rifles ... in about two minutes the ground between the two lines of trenches was swarming with men and officers of both sides, shaking hands and wishing each other a happy Christmas." British and German soldiers gathered in a dusty field in Afghanistan on Wednesday to play a game of soccer in memory of a Christmas truce spontaneously called between their armies a century ago during World War One. That moment in 1914 - when troops along Europe's Flanders front met after four months killing each...
  • The forgotten sneak attack on Britain that backfired on the Kaiser

    12/14/2014 6:32:50 AM PST · by the scotsman · 33 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 14th December 2014 | Tony Rennell
    'A bank of fog was sitting a couple of miles out at sea and a heavy mist lay over the East Coast resort of Scarborough as postman Alfred Beal climbed the wide front steps of Dunollie, a porticoed mansion high on the towns South Cliff. He never reached the door that fateful morning on December 16, 1914, almost exactly a century ago. Three German warships had burst out of the fog bank and were now steaming past the headland, firing volley after volley of shells. One caught poor Beal and blasted his shattered body back down the drive. A second...
  • Still bearing the scars of war, the beautiful landscapes which were once the scene of some of...

    11/07/2014 11:45:40 AM PST · by PROCON · 12 replies
    dailymail.uk.co ^ | Nov. 7, 2014 | Annabel Grossman
    These haunting images reveal the battlefields of World War One as they look today - one hundred years after the fighting broke out. The powerful and atmospheric shots were taken by photographer, Michael St Maur Sheil, who spent seven years on the project. The collection, called Fields of Battle-Lands of Peace 14-18, form an open-air exhibition featuring 60 freestanding photographs, each measuring 1.2 metres (4ft) by 1.8 metres (5ft 10in).
  • UN Inspectors find Mustard Gas Shells

    12/04/2002 12:53:24 PM PST · by rumrunner · 129 replies · 2,040+ views
    AP | 12/05/2002
    Demetrius Perricos, who is leading one of the U.N. inspection teams in Iraq, said Wednesday his team of international arms experts secured about a dozen Iraqi artillery shells containing the mustard liquid agent.
  • Viewpoint: The deadly disease that killed more people than WW1

    10/13/2014 10:50:00 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 28 replies
    bbc ^ | 10-12-2014
    A deadly illness took hold as WW1 ended and killed an estimated 50 million people globally. But the horror made the world aware of the need for collective action against infectious diseases, says Christian Tams, professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow. On Armistice Day, 1918, the world was already fighting another battle. It was in the grip of Spanish Influenza, which went on to kill almost three times more people than the 17 million soldiers and civilians killed during WW1. Dangerous diseases only reach the headlines if there is a risk of a pandemic, like the current...
  • War, Culture, & the Minds of Nations Did Germanys cultural avant-garde cause WWI? Vice versa?

    09/09/2014 9:19:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The National Review ^ | September 8, 2014 | John OSullivan
    German infantry at the Vistula River, 1916We are accustomed to thinking that such real-world physical experiences as war, defeat, and economic ruin produce such psychological, cultural, artistic, and social responses as disillusionment, frenzy (including frenzied enjoyments), and despair in the collective mind. The First World War which, exactly 100 years later, we are now remembering, and whose lessons we are still pondering seems to confirm and illustrate this belief. It was an event whose magnitude and impact we find hard to grasp even today. Though it began in the Balkans, it spread across the world to all continents...
  • 50th anniversary of Yorks death to be celebrated Monday

    09/02/2014 11:58:48 AM PDT · by Borges · 71 replies
    God would never be cruel enough to create a cyclone as terrible as that Argonne battle. Only man would ever think of doing an awful thing like that. And Im telling you the little log cabin in Wolf Valley in old Tennessee seemed a long, long way off. With those words, Sergeant Alvin C. York recalled the intensity of the October, 1918 battle that defined him for generations of Tennesseans as the most highly decorated American soldier of World War I, earning the Congressional Medal of Honor among numerous other awards. In those moments of battle, York, of Fentress...
  • A New Video Documentary Reveals the Hidden Ideological and Scientific Roots of World War I

    08/18/2014 9:30:18 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 26 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | August 18, 2014 | News
    A New Video Documentary Reveals the Hidden Ideological and Scientific Roots of World War I Evolution News & Views August 18, 2014 5:55 AM | Permalink This month marks the hundredth anniversary of the start of the First World War. Between 1914 and 1918, the conflict took 16 million lives in brutal combat yet its causes remain strangely cloudy to most of us. One historian titled his recent book about the origins of the war The Sleepwalkers, as if nations and leaders stumbled into the global catastrophe almost by accident, unmotivated by any particular philosophy or ideology.World War II is...
  • The Hidden World of the Great War- The Lost Underground of World War I

    07/29/2014 9:19:39 AM PDT · by Theoria · 3 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | Aug 2014 | Evan Hadingham
    The entrance is a wet hole in the earth little bigger than an animal burrow, obscured by thorny brush in a secluded wood in northeastern France. Im following Jeff Gusky, a photographer and physician from Texas who has explored dozens of underground spaces like this one. Together we slither through the muddy hole into the darkness below. Soon the passage opens up, and we crawl forward on hands and knees. The glow from our headlamps wavers along the dusty chalk walls of the century-old tunnel, which slopes away from us down into the shadows. After a few hundred feet the...
  • How Nicky and Willy could have prevented World War I

    07/27/2014 2:07:46 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 19 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 7-27-14 | Graham Allison
    One hundred years ago this week, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany exchanged a series of telegrams to try to stop the rush to a war that neither of them wanted. They signed their notes Nicky and Willy. Cousins who vacationed together, hunted together and enjoyed dressing up in the uniforms of each others military officers when sailing on their yachts, these two great-great-grandsons of Paul I of Russia wrote to each other in English, affirming their mutual interests and outlining an agreement that would have resolved the crisis on terms acceptable to both rulers. Yet...
  • Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online

    07/23/2014 3:36:07 PM PDT · by fso301 · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | 07/23/2014 | Staff Writers
    More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website. The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free. The archive will also help people compiling family histories, say curators, since it has extensive information about locations where individual soldiers served. It also contains letters written to and by combatants in the war, which began on July 28, 1914, and...
  • The Foul Tornado: On the centenary of World War I (Outstanding Read)

    07/14/2014 12:17:39 PM PDT · by mojito · 46 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | July/August 2014 | Peter Hitchens
    To say that that the First World War was the greatest cataclysm in human history since the fall of the Roman Empire is to put it mildly. The war destroyed so many good things and killed so many good people that civilization has not recovered and probably never will. Long after it officially ended, it continued to cause millions of deaths and tragedies, most obviously during its encore performance of 1939-45. But it did not stop even then. Many of its worst consequences came during official periods of peace and are unknown or forgotten, or remain unconnected with it in...
  • The War that Never Ended

    06/30/2014 9:53:14 PM PDT · by rmlew · 9 replies
    Gates of Vienna ^ | June 28, 2014 | Baron Bodissey
    One hundred years ago today a Bosnian Serb named Gavrilo Princip assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie. The grand duke the heir to the Austrian throne was shot while traveling in what would today be called a motorcade. He was paying an official visit to Sarajevo in Bosnia-Herzegovina, which was then a province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.Princips action was the trigger for a four-year catastrophe that eventually became known as the Great War or the World War. Later events forced a renaming, and it became the First World War or World War One.Four and...
  • 100 years later, remembering the crucible called World War I

    06/28/2014 7:33:17 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 17 replies
    la times ^ | 6-28-14 | Henry Chu
    The shot that changed the world rang out on a sunny summer's morning in Southeastern Europe. No one knew then that the assassin's bullet would spell the death not just of an Austrian aristocrat but the entire global order, with four empires and millions of lives lost in a conflict on a scale never before seen.. Exactly 100 years ago Saturday, Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and his wife, Sophie, were shot at close range by a young Serbian nationalist on the streets of Sarajevo. The assassination set off a chain reaction that, barely a...
  • World War I: The War That Changed Everything(A Good Read)

    06/23/2014 10:39:30 AM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 20 replies
    WSJ ^ | 20 June 2014 | Margaret MacMillan
    A hundred years ago next week, in the small Balkan city of Sarajevo, Serbian nationalists murdered the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary and his wife. People were shocked but not particularly worried. Sadly, there had been many political assassinations in previous yearsthe king of Italy, two Spanish prime ministers, the Russian czar, President William McKinley. None had led to a major crisis. Yet just as a pebble can start a landslide, this killing set off a series of events that, in five weeks, led Europe into a general war.
  • History Channel's 'The World Wars' Chock Full of Major Historical Errors

    05/29/2014 7:16:16 AM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 95 replies
    NewsBusters ^ | May 29, 2014 | P.J. Gladnick
    Did you know that the Communists stormed the Winter Palace and overthrew the Czar? If you are right now screaming at your computer screen in anger, congratulations. That means you are more informed on the subject of history than the entire History channel. The error cited above is but one of the many that the History Channel included in their three part series, "The World Wars," this week. The amazing thing is that not only a particular History Channel writer made these errors but that nobody at the History Channel spotted them. Are they so involved in the "history" of...
  • ANZACs lasting Middle East impact

    04/26/2014 7:00:20 AM PDT · by Former Fetus · 1 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | 4/25/2014 | Dave Sharma
    Ninety-nine years ago today, April 25, in the very early hours before dawn, some 1200 kilometers from Jerusalem, members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps or ANZACs landed on the western shore of the Gallipoli Peninsula, in modern-day Turkey, at a place we now call Anzac Cove. At roughly the same time, British forces landed at the southern tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula, at Cape Helles, whilst French forces went ashore at Kum Kale, on the Turkish mainland just opposite Cape Helles. Indian and Canadian troops later joined the campaign. This multinational invasion force was to...
  • Suit seeks removal of Bladensburg cross

    03/13/2014 8:01:15 PM PDT · by Pyro7480 · 51 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 03/01/2014 | Michael E. Ruane
    The American Humanist Association filed a lawsuit last week in federal court in Maryland calling for the removal of Bladensburgs 40-foot Memorial Peace Cross, which honors men from Prince Georges County who died during World War I. The association and three individual plaintiffs contend that the cross, which is on state property, violates the constitutional principle of separation of church and state. The cross was dedicated in 1925. ...One of the individual plaintiffs, Steven Lowe of Washington, contends that the cross "associates a Christian religious symbol with the state and gives the impression that the state supports and approves of...
  • How Bad Directions (And A Sandwich) Started World War I

    03/06/2014 3:10:44 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 42 replies
    NPR ^ | March 06, 2014
    World War I began 100 years ago this summer. It's a centennial that goes beyond mere remembrance; the consequences of that conflict are making headlines to this day. To underline that, All Things Considered wanted to turn history on its head and ask historians and listeners alike: What if World War I had never happened? (Submit your answer in the form below.) If that sounds like an unlikely exercise, compare it to an even more unlikely event the one that occurred on June 28, 1914, in the city of Sarajevo. It was the spark that ignited a global conflagration,...
  • World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

    02/20/2014 2:15:56 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 72 replies
    BBC News Magazine ^ | February 11, 2014 | BBC
    Royal cousins Wilhelm II and King George V went to war As nations gear up to mark 100 years since the start of World War One, academic argument still rages over which country was to blame for the conflict.Education Secretary for England Michael Gove's recent criticism of how the causes and consequences of the war are taught in schools has only stoked the debate further. Here 10 leading historians give their opinion. Sir Max Hastings - military historian Germany No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most.
  • Century of Violence: What World War I Did to the Middle East

    02/03/2014 11:48:30 AM PST · by sukhoi-30mki · 16 replies
    Spiegel Online International ^ | January 31, 2014 | Bernhard Zand
    World War I may have ended in 1918, but the violence it triggered in the Middle East still hasn't come to an end. Arbitrary borders drawn by self-interested imperial powers have left a legacy that the region has not been able to overcome. Damascus, year three of the civil war: The 4th Division of the Syrian army has entrenched itself on Kassioun Mountain, the place where Cain is said to have slain his brother Abel. United Nations ballistics experts say the poison gas projectiles that landed in the Damascus suburbs of Muadamiya and Ain Tarma in the morning hours of...
  • Envoy Sent to London: Berlin Denies Rift with UK over WWI Centenary

    08/20/2013 1:44:13 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 58 replies
    Der Spiegel ^ | August 19, 2013 06:33 PM | Friederike Heine
    The German Foreign Ministry on Monday denied allegations that it was attempting to influence Britains plans to commemorate the 2014 centenary of the outbreak of World War I. A spokesman for the ministry confirmed reports that it had sent an envoy to London in early August to discuss the centenary ceremonies. But he added: There was no intervention of any kind in how our friends and partners intend to shape their commemoration of World War I. The Daily Telegraph reported on Sunday that the visit by Andreas Meitzner, a German diplomat tasked with coordinating European commemoration plans for the centenary,...
  • Story of Captains Courage Resurfaces After 98 years

    06/21/2013 5:10:14 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 18 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 21 Jun 2013 | Hayley Dixon
    Captain John Bell was hailed a hero when he faced down the might of a German U-boat by ramming it with his tiny, unarmed cargo ship, becoming the first to sink such a vessel.But like the U-boat Captain Bells story sunk into obscurity - until now, almost 100 years after the event, when his medals are to go for auction. He went on the offensive after the fearsome submarine fired a torpedo at his small steamship in the English Channel. He steered full steam ahead towards the U-boat's periscope until he and his crew heard a loud crash from beneath...
  • Obama Uses 1917 Espionage Act to Go After Reporters

    05/27/2013 3:27:18 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 35 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 27, 2013 | Michael Barone
    There is one problem with the entirely justified if self-interested media squawking about the Justice Department snooping into the phone records of multiple Associated Press reporters and Fox News's James Rosen. The problem is that what the AP reporters and Rosen did arguably violates the letter of the law. The search warrant in the Rosen case cites Section 793(d) of Title 18 of the U.S. Code. Section 793(d) says that a person lawfully in possession of information that the government has classified as secret who turns it over to someone not lawfully entitled to posses it has committed a crime....
  • 1916: World War I Postcard from Hitler Discovered with Misspelling

    02/05/2013 6:32:55 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 15 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Europeana 1914-1918
    1916: Badly spelt postcard from Hitler discovered The father of the owner of the postcard was for many years Landrat (District Administrator) of Dingolfing in Bavaria and an avid stamp collector. On his 65th Birthday, the head of the District Savings Bank presented him with this memorable philatelic collectors item. It is a field postcard written by Corporal Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) to his regimental comrade Karl Lanzhammer (1896-1918) on 19/12/1916 from Munich. Karl Lanzhammer was a friend of Hitlers from their time together on the Western Front, and a known correspondent of his. At this time he was a cyclist...
  • America's Story (part 10) - Sergeant York

    11/10/2012 1:18:02 PM PST · by NEWwoman · 13 replies
    smithsk.blogspot.com ^ | November 5, 2012 | smithsk
    Remember World War One? My grandfather had fought in that war and it seemed like a century ago ... and it was. In two years will be the centennial of the start of the First World War (1914 - 1918). At that time, it was called the Great War, the World War, the War to End all Wars. Only after the start of World War Two was it called World War One. (First World War.com - A Multimedia History of World War One) We see a legacy of the Great War this coming Monday. Signing the Armistice to cease the...
  • In Defense of His Majesty

    09/10/2005 10:30:16 AM PDT · by Unreconstructed Selmerite · 17 replies · 836+ views
    military.com ^ | September 7, 2005 | William S. Lind
    As regular readers in this column know, my reporting senior and lawful sovereign is His Imperial Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II. When I finally report in to that great Oberste Heeresleitung in the sky, I expect to do so as the Kaisers last soldier. Why? Well, beyond Bestimmung, the unhappy fact is that Western civilizations last chance of survival was probably a victory by the Central Powers in World War I. Their defeat let all the poisons of the French Revolution loose unchecked, which is the main reason that we now live in a moral and cultural cesspool.
  • Archaeologists find the bodies of 21 tragic World War One German soldiers...

    02/10/2012 7:53:15 PM PST · by Daffynition · 44 replies
    DailyMail ^ | 10th February 2012 | Graham Smith
    Abbreviated title: The 'Pompeii' of the Western Front: Archaeologists find the bodies of 21 tragic World War One German soldiers in perfectly preserved trenches where they were buried alive by an Allied shell The bodies of 21 German soldiers entombed in a perfectly preserved World War One shelter have been discovered 94 years after they were killed. The men were part of a larger group of 34 who were buried alive when a huge Allied shell exploded above the tunnel in 1918, causing it to cave in. Thirteen bodies were recovered from the underground shelter, but the remaining men had...
  • Veteran's Day 2011 - final homecoming of the WWI vets

    11/08/2011 7:32:26 PM PST · by NEWwoman · 8 replies
    smithsk.blogspot.com ^ | November 6, 2011 | smithsk
    It happened almost a hundred years ago - the Great War, the World War - now known as World War One, as there would be more than one great world war in the 20th century. For many of us, our great grandparents, grandparents, and even parents may have fought in this war. To all of us still living, the Great War seems like ancient history. Volumes were written about this war, which H.G. Wells called - "The War That Will End War." For a summary, below is a brief history of the First World War: .... The "armistice" to end...
  • The Soldiers Humour 1915 & 2010

    09/26/2011 2:42:07 PM PDT · by sussex · 8 replies
    The Aged P.com ^ | 26/09/11 | The Aged P
    Throughout history I would guess the soldiers response to the dark terror of war has been a sense of humour, often even in the grimmest of situations. One of the most famous cartoons ever drawn was created by Bruce Bairnsfather, a British artist who fought in the trenches on the Western Front. As an antidote to the patriotic sketches made by the staff artists in the London magazines, who had no experience of war, Bairnsfathers observations of everyday life in the trenches became very popular with the soldiers themselves and this one, with its grim humour became the stuff of...
  • WWI underground: Unearthing the hidden tunnel war (...killed an estimated 10,000 Germans.)

    06/10/2011 10:09:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 62 replies
    BBC ^ | June 10, 2011 | Peter Jackson
    Archaeologists are beginning the most detailed ever study of a Western Front battlefield, an untouched site where 28 British tunnellers lie entombed after dying during brutal underground warfare. For WWI historians, it's the "holy grail".When military historian Jeremy Banning stepped on to a patch of rough scrubland in northern France four months ago, the hairs on the back of his neck stood up. The privately-owned land in the sleepy rural village of La Boisselle had been practically untouched since fighting ceased in 1918, remaining one of the most poignant sites of the Battle of the Somme. In his hand was...
  • Last World War I combat vet dies in Australia

    05/05/2011 6:31:19 AM PDT · by uglybiker · 18 replies
    msnbc.com ^ | 5/5/2011 | KRISTEN GELINEAU
    SYDNEY The last known combat veteran of World War I was defiant of the tolls of time, a centenarian who swam in the sea, twirled across dance floors, and published his first book at 108. He also refused to submit to his place in history, becoming a pacifist who wouldn't march in parades commemorating wars like the one that made him famous. Claude Stanley Choules, a man of contradictions, humble spirit and wry humor, died in a Western Australia nursing home on Thursday at the age of 110. And though his accomplishments were many including a a 41-year...
  • Last World War I combat vet dies in Australia

    05/04/2011 8:20:10 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 15 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 4, 2011 | KRISTEN GELINEAU
    SYDNEY Claude Stanley Choules, the last known combat veteran of World War I, died Thursday at a nursing home in the Western Australia city of Perth, his family said. He was 110. "We all loved him," his 84-year-old daughter Daphne Edinger told The Associated Press. "It's going to be sad to think of him not being here any longer, but that's the way things go."
  • What got the USA into WW1? ZOT needed.

    04/23/2011 8:53:56 PM PDT · by freepguy · 245 replies · 2+ views
    myself | various | varios
    I'm trying to get the facts that show why the USA got into WW1. As I can tell, Wilson was president. The US was neutral...did not want to get involved. Britian and the Allied Powers were losing the war against the Central Powers. The Balfour Declaration promised a Jewish state in Palestine. The Lusitana was armed and ordered to attack German U-boats. Propaganda was created to convince American populace that Germany needed to be conqered. Can anyone help me get more info on the subject? Thanks. FG
  • Spiro Agnew's Father was a Non-Citizen

    04/12/2011 11:27:59 AM PDT · by Captain Kirk · 142 replies
    U.S. Census 1920 ^ | 1920 | U.S. Bureau of the Census
    See line 72-75 and scroll over to the box that asks about citizenship. Theodore Agnew, Spiro's father, indicates in the box that he is an "al" (for alien). Young Spiro is shown on line 75. We now have two precedents against the birthers. The other is Chester Arthur. Both had non-citizen fathers and NOBODY in either case cared at the time. The controversy over Arthur was solely related to his alleged foreign birth.
  • Being T.E. Lawrence (Review of Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia by Michael Korda)

    04/11/2011 3:10:27 PM PDT · by mojito · 9 replies
    Hoover Institution's Policy Review ^ | 4/1/2011 | Joseph Bottum
    He was the best of England and the worst. A wastrel, in many ways, and a triumph, in others. A hero and a clown. A scholar and a soldier. A sophisticate and a naf. A child and a grown-up. He was an adolescent, all in all: perhaps the greatest lifelong teenager the modern world has ever known, with every bit of the soaring self-confidence and crushing self-doubt the awkward years can bring. His name was Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence. Or T.E. Lawrence, as he signed his books, or John Hume Ross and T.E. Shaw, the military pseudonyms under which...
  • Last American World War I Veteran Dies

    02/28/2011 4:31:31 PM PST · by DBCJR · 9 replies
    The last known American veteran of World War I died Sunday at his home in West Virginia. Former U.S. Army Corporal Frank Buckles was 110 years old... Buckles wanted to serve when World War I broke out, and his lie to the recruiter made it possible. Shortly afterward, at age 16, he deployed to Europe as an ambulance driver. He saw the horror of war close up, ferrying the wounded from the trenches to primitive field hospitals. Later, he drove German prisoners back to Germany. Buckles left the army in 1920 and years later he went to work for a...
  • Once an Eagle

    02/24/2011 9:06:44 PM PST · by occamrzr06 · 4 replies
    Once An Eagle, a novel by Anton Myrer, was published in 1968, at the height of the Vietnam War. Nearly forty years later, this classic novel of soldiers and soldiering remains in print, having sold well over three million copies. It remains a fixture on the Marine Corps Commandants Reading List, as well as other military professional reading lists. The novel also spawned, in 1976, an outstanding nine-hour television miniseries of the same name, starring Sam Elliot, Glen Ford, and Darlene Carr. Once An Eagle is the epic tale of good versus evil. The good is embodied in protagonist Sam...
  • WWI veteran to celebrate 110th birthday today

    02/01/2011 10:02:16 AM PST · by Puppage · 20 replies
    herald-mail.com ^ | 2/1/2011 | Puppage
    CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. Frank Woodruff Buckles, Jefferson Countys most famous living citizen and the last surviving World War I doughboy, turns 110 years old Tuesday. Buckles, who lives with his daughter, Susannah Buckles Flanagan, at Gap View, the family farm off old W.Va. 9, has been the subject of wide media and congressional attention in recent years. In 2010, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., and U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., co-sponsored a bill to rededicate and restore a monument in Washington, D.C., honoring the 500 or so District of Columbia residents who served in World War I. Their...
  • JIHAD IN WW1, Ottoman Jihad against the Russians, French, British and genocide on Christians

    12/06/2010 3:32:08 PM PST · by PRePublic · 15 replies · 4+ views
    JIHAD IN WW1 A: Ottoman Jihad against the Russians, French, British. B: Jihad genocide on the Armenians Against the: Russians, French, BritishBBC - History - World Wars: The Middle East during World War One By Professor David R Woodward, Last updated 2010-10-15 TThe Ottoman Empire called for a military jihad against France, Russia and Great Britain in November 1914. How did this affect subsequent Allied campaigns in the Middle East? David Woodward charts the demise of an empire and a dramatic shift in the region's balance of power.http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/middle_east_01.shtml"From Babel to dragomans: interpreting the Middle East," Bernard Lewis, Oxford University Press...
  • 3 British World War I-era ships found off Estonia

    08/23/2010 9:51:02 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 18 replies
    AP ^ | August 23, 2010
    TALLINN, Estonia The wrecks of three British warships sunk after World War I off the coast of a Baltic Sea island have been found, Estonia's military announced Monday. Using state-of-the-art sonar equipment, an Estonian naval vessel last week located the wrecks of HMS Cassandra, HMS Gentian and HMS Myrtle near the Estonian island of Saaremaa, about 90 miles (140 kilometers) southwest of the capital, Tallinn. "We are convinced that these (wrecks) are ... those perished British vessels," Cmdr. Ivo Vark said in a statement. He said that the last coordinates of the vessels reported by then British squadron...
  • War veterans remember Indian soldiers' effort in World War I

    06/27/2010 12:57:17 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    Indian and British war veterans came together in scores to pay homage to the Indian soldiers who gave up their lives in World War I, fighting on the side of the Allies, at a touching memorial service in Brighton. At a solemn ceremony last evening, Nalin Surie, the Indian High Commissioner to UK, saluted the supreme sacrifices made by Indian soldiers. "Over one million Indian Army soldiers saw active service alongside British troops during the First World War," he said at the Chattri memorial. Surie said Brighton has a special place in the hearts of the people as 12,000 Indian...