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  • The Ultimatum That Made The Great War A Foregone Conclusion

    07/24/2014 4:28:00 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 5 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | July 23, 2014 | Aleksandra Rebic
    THE ULTIMATUM THAT MADE THE GREAT WAR A FOREGONE CONCLUSION / Austria-Hungary presents the Kingdom of Serbia with the "Impossible Ultimatum" 100 years ago July 23, 1914Aleksandra's Note: What follows is the impossible Austro-Hungarian ultimatum presented to the government of the Kingdom of Serbia on July 23, 1914, just over 3 weeks after the June 28th assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Fair historians have assessed this ultimatum as being both unreasonable and, more importantly, clearly intended to set Serbia up to fail to meet the demands, thus giving the green light for the war against the Serbs...
  • Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online

    07/23/2014 3:36:07 PM PDT · by fso301 · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 07/23/2014 | Staff Writers
    More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website. The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free. The archive will also help people compiling family histories, say curators, since it has extensive information about locations where individual soldiers served. It also contains letters written to and by combatants in the war, which began on July 28, 1914, and...
  • THE PROSPECT OF WAR WITH SERBIA - "The July Crisis"

    07/15/2014 6:42:08 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 8 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | July 15, 2014 | Austrian Ministerial Council Meeting July 7, 1914
    Aleksandra's Note: The following documentary evidence, the source of which is the Austrian Ministerial Council during the "JULY CRISIS" of 1914 confirms the "theory" that war with Serbia was a foregone conclusion regardless of the Austrian "Ultimatum" that would follow on July 23 and regardless of Serbia's response to that Ultimatum. War would be waged against Serbia, period. What these officials present at this council meeting did not foresee was that war against Serbia would be just the beginning... Sincerely, Aleksandra Rebic ***** Franz Ferdinand (in fur-lined coat) on a hunting weekend with Wilhelm II (left) in 1914. AKG Images...
  • PURGING PRINCIP, THEN AND NOW

    07/10/2014 10:27:57 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 6 replies
    The German invaders occupied Sarajevo on April 15, 1941. Two days later, the local population looted and torched the Grand Synagogue. And on April 19, the local Germans (Volksdeutsche) removed a memorial plaque to Gavrilo Princip; it was sent to Hitler as a trophy and birthday gift. In 1930, a memorial plaque was erected above the street corner where Gavrilo Princip assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, with the following inscription: “At this historic place Gavrilo Princip heralded freedom on Vidov-Dan, June 15 [28] June 1914” (Serbian: „На овом историјском мјесту, Гаврило Принцип навијести слободу, на Видов-дан 15 [28] јуна 1914“) The...
  • The Middle East That France and Britain Drew Is Finally Unravelling

    06/28/2014 7:33:29 AM PDT · by re_tail20 · 10 replies
    The New Republic ^ | June 26, 2014 | John Judis
    The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) publishes a weekly webzine, The Islamic State Report. The latest issue is headlined Smashing the Borders of the Tawaghit. (Tawaghit are non-Muslim creations.) ISIS, citing the Sykes-Picot Treaty of 1916 between the British and French, boasts that it is destroying the partitioning of Muslim lands by crusader powers. That may seem like a quixotic task for a relatively small band of irregulars, but in trying to redraw the map of Iraq and Syria, ISIS has hit upon a weak link in the chain holding the nations of the Middle East together. It...
  • ANZACs lasting Middle East impact

    04/26/2014 7:00:20 AM PDT · by Former Fetus · 1 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | 4/25/2014 | Dave Sharma
    Ninety-nine years ago today, April 25, in the very early hours before dawn, some 1200 kilometers from Jerusalem, members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps or ANZACs landed on the western shore of the Gallipoli Peninsula, in modern-day Turkey, at a place we now call Anzac Cove. At roughly the same time, British forces landed at the southern tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula, at Cape Helles, whilst French forces went ashore at Kum Kale, on the Turkish mainland just opposite Cape Helles. Indian and Canadian troops later joined the campaign. This multinational invasion force was to...
  • 100 years later, remembering the crucible called World War I

    06/28/2014 7:33:17 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 17 replies
    la times ^ | 6-28-14 | Henry Chu
    The shot that changed the world rang out on a sunny summer's morning in Southeastern Europe. No one knew then that the assassin's bullet would spell the death not just of an Austrian aristocrat but the entire global order, with four empires and millions of lives lost in a conflict on a scale never before seen.. Exactly 100 years ago Saturday, Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and his wife, Sophie, were shot at close range by a young Serbian nationalist on the streets of Sarajevo. The assassination set off a chain reaction that, barely a...
  • Archduke Franz Ferdinand: The man whose assassination is blamed for triggering World War I

    06/28/2014 4:16:11 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 26 replies
    ABC (AUS) ^ | 06.28.14
    Archduke Franz Ferdinand is best known as the man whose assassination is widely believed to have led to the outbreak of World War I. But behind that figure lies a story of forbidden love, an obsession with hunting, and a near-miss that could have killed the archduke months before he was shot dead with his wife Sophie in Sarajevo 100 years ago.
  • World War One anniversary: what if Archduke Franz Ferdinand had lived?

    06/28/2014 9:07:15 AM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 53 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | june 27, 2014 | Tim Stanley and Olivia Bolton
    was like something from a film - what started as a farce ended as a tragedy. When Archduke Franz Ferdinand arrived in Sarajevo on June 28 1914, someone threw a bomb at him but it missed. Gavrilo Princip was meant to shoot him there and then but couldnt get a clear shot. So he went to sulk in a caf instead. It was only when Ferdinands car later went down the same street by the same caf and got stuck in the road - that Princip took his chance and shot the Archduke dead. But what if Princip had missed?...
  • Bosnian Serbs unveil statue honoring Archduke Ferdunand's assassin

    06/28/2014 5:46:34 AM PDT · by markomalley · 58 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 6/28/2014 | Rick Moran
    This is pretty bizarre - even for the Balkans. Bosnian Serbs unveiled a statue yesterday honoring Gavrilo Princip, the teenager who pulled the trigger in Sarajevo 100 years ago today killing Archduke Ferdinand - heir to the throne of the Hapsburg Empire - and his wife. The event touched off a series of blunders, misjudgements, and misadventures that culminated in the great powers stumbling into a war that few of them wanted and none could foresee the consequences for. By the time the dust settled in November, 1918, the Hapsburg and Ottoman Empires had disintegrated, Russia had gone Communist, and...
  • WWI and the Second Fall of Man

    06/27/2014 8:58:56 PM PDT · by se99tp · 27 replies
    ChristianConcepsDaily ^ | June 28th, 2014 | Paul Kengor
    On June 28, 1914, a Bosnian-Serb student named Gavrilo Princip killed Austrian archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, the duchess. () That deadly summer unfolded 100 years ago, and the world truly was never the same. Civilization was soon engaged in a horrific conflict marred by mechanized warfare previously unimaginable: tanks, subs, battleships, air power, machine guns with names like the Devils paint brush, and legions of poison gasthe largest-scale use of chemical weapons in history.
  • JUNE 27, 1914 - THE DAY BEFORE THE WORLD CHANGED FOREVER 100 YEARS AGO.

    06/27/2014 8:17:19 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 15 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | June 27, 2014 | Aleksandra Rebic
    DUSK June 27, 2014 / Photo by Aleksandra Rebic Today is Friday, June 27, 2014. Exactly 100 years ago today was the day before everything in the world changed forever. History tells us that it was a beautiful summer in 1914 - everything a summer should be. This peaceful atmosphere in Europe had only 24 hours left. The next day, June 28, 1914 was Vidovdan (St. Vitus Day), a most sacred day in Serbian history. It was also the day that an Austrian Archduke and his wife would come visiting and go for a ride in Sarajevo, a city in...
  • The tragedy to end all of tragedies?

    06/26/2014 8:17:54 PM PDT · by se99tp · 4 replies
    ChristianConcepsDaily ^ | June 27th, 2014 | Gary Welton
    We are our brothers keepers, and we need to be wise as we plan international policy and personal treatment. Nevertheless, it is idealistic and unreasonable to expect that the insane consequences of our human condition will be eradicated this side of eternity.
  • Portrait bought for $670 could now be auctioned off for as much as $839,000 Read more:

    06/11/2014 7:41:07 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 11 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | 6-11-14 | Melanie Greenwood
    Father Jamie MacLeod unknowingly bought the work of Anthony Van Dyck 12 years ago at an antique shop for $670. But after being authenticated by the TV program Antiques Roadshow, the portrait could now sell for as much as $839,000 at auction. MacLeod plans to use the money to buy church bells to commemorate the end of WWI. A British priest who picked up a painting for $670 is likely to see it sold at auction for as much as $839,000. The BBC reported that Father Jamie MacLeod found Anthony Van Dycks Flemish Baroque work 12 years ago in a...
  • WWI in color photos

    04/18/2014 8:52:59 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 29 replies
    Austrian Soldier, Eastern Europe, 1915 German troops in Berlin, 1914 Ambulances in Palestine, 1918 French trenches, 1916 Senegalese troops, France, 1917 Dead Italian soldiers, Italy, 1915
  • Teenagers smuggle WWI bombs on a Heathrow jet bound for Chicago

    04/09/2014 11:53:13 PM PDT · by Slings and Arrows · 27 replies
    Metro [UK] ^ | 9 Apr 2014 | Daniel Binns
    Heathrow Airport has been forced to defend its security after a pair of students smuggled two large World War I artillery shells on to a plane and flew to the US. Baggage screeners made the discovery when the teenagers landed in Chicago, sparking a major incident. It is believed they picked up the 75mm munitions as souvenirs while on a school trip to a former artillery range in France. The find prompted the evacuation of OHare International Airport by the FBI before officials concluded there was no risk of the shells exploding. It is not clear how the students, aged...
  • West celebrates WWI cavalrymen India forgot

    03/30/2014 7:22:38 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 9 replies
    Times of India ^ | Mar 31, 2014, 12.21 AM IST | Manimugdha S Sharma,TNN
    Indian officers of Skinner's Horse with their British officer in 1900. NEW DELHI: Popular culture in India has glorified the martial traditions of the Rajputs. One of which was saka, in which fighting men of a defeated state rode out for a final, suicidal battle dressed in yellow. That antiquated Rajput code has survived in the yellow ceremonial uniform of one of Indian Army's oldest cavalry regiments, the 1st Horse or Skinner's Horse. Over two centuries after it was raised by a "white Mughal" James Skinner who was denied a commission in the Honourable East India Company's...
  • As others mark World War One centenary, Germans prefer to forget

    03/20/2014 6:18:09 AM PDT · by C19fan · 46 replies
    Reuters ^ | march 19, 2014 | Erik Kirschbaum
    A simple plaque marks the forsaken spot where the Red Baron was buried in central Berlin but hardly anyone stops to remember the flying ace shot down in 1918. For Germans, the Great War holds so little interest. The centenary of the outbreak of World War One has caught Germany off guard, while Britain, France, the United States and others mark it with battlefield tours, television programs, exhibitions and plans for ceremonies on the day, in August. Germans aren't sure how, or even if, they should commemorate a war that cost them 13 percent of their territory, all their colonies,...
  • Suit seeks removal of Bladensburg cross

    03/13/2014 8:01:15 PM PDT · by Pyro7480 · 51 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 03/01/2014 | Michael E. Ruane
    The American Humanist Association filed a lawsuit last week in federal court in Maryland calling for the removal of Bladensburgs 40-foot Memorial Peace Cross, which honors men from Prince Georges County who died during World War I. The association and three individual plaintiffs contend that the cross, which is on state property, violates the constitutional principle of separation of church and state. The cross was dedicated in 1925. ...One of the individual plaintiffs, Steven Lowe of Washington, contends that the cross "associates a Christian religious symbol with the state and gives the impression that the state supports and approves of...
  • Tolkiens Lord Of The Rings battle scenes were inspired by WW1 experiences

    02/28/2014 4:23:30 AM PST · by Perdogg · 20 replies
    The harrowing battle scenes and heartache in J.R.R. Tolkiens fantasy masterpiece The Lord Of The Rings were inspired by the authors own First World War nightmare and the death of close friends from Birmingham.
  • Sailor's letter arrives a century later and delivered to WWI seaman's great granddaughter

    02/22/2014 7:33:33 AM PST · by NYer · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | February 23, 2014
    A forgotten letter from a mystery First World War sailor has found its way to his granddaughter after almost a century. The note dated 1916 was discovered behind a fireplace in Kirkwall, Orkney, and signed Your Blue Jacket Boy. Addressed to the servicemans family, it was sealed and stamped but never posted. Staff at Orkney Library hoped to identify the letter writer and launched an appeal on their blog. The hunt spread to Canada, where a distant relative suggested the sailor might be David John Phillips from Llanelli, South Wales. The relative contacted Mary Hodge in Chester, who recognised the...
  • World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

    02/20/2014 2:15:56 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 72 replies
    BBC News Magazine ^ | February 11, 2014 | BBC
    Royal cousins Wilhelm II and King George V went to war As nations gear up to mark 100 years since the start of World War One, academic argument still rages over which country was to blame for the conflict.Education Secretary for England Michael Gove's recent criticism of how the causes and consequences of the war are taught in schools has only stoked the debate further. Here 10 leading historians give their opinion. Sir Max Hastings - military historian Germany No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most.
  • Century of Violence: What World War I Did to the Middle East

    02/03/2014 11:48:30 AM PST · by sukhoi-30mki · 16 replies
    Spiegel Online International ^ | January 31, 2014 | Bernhard Zand
    World War I may have ended in 1918, but the violence it triggered in the Middle East still hasn't come to an end. Arbitrary borders drawn by self-interested imperial powers have left a legacy that the region has not been able to overcome. Damascus, year three of the civil war: The 4th Division of the Syrian army has entrenched itself on Kassioun Mountain, the place where Cain is said to have slain his brother Abel. United Nations ballistics experts say the poison gas projectiles that landed in the Damascus suburbs of Muadamiya and Ain Tarma in the morning hours of...
  • Britain entering first world war was 'biggest error in modern history'

    01/31/2014 11:47:48 PM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 83 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | 30 January 2014 | Maev Kennedy
    Britain could have lived with a German victory in the first world war, and should have stayed out of the conflict in 1914, according to the historian Niall Ferguson, who described the intervention as "the biggest error in modern history". In an interview with BBC History Magazine, Ferguson said there had been no immediate threat to Britain, which could have faced a Germany-dominated Europe at a later date on its own terms, instead of rushing in unprepared, which led to catastrophic costs. "Britain could indeed have lived with a German victory. What's more, it would have been in Britain's interests...
  • Serbia Has a New Teen Idol (Statue of Gavrilo Princip to be erected)

    01/24/2014 7:34:22 AM PST · by C19fan · 39 replies
    The American Interest Blog ^ | January 24, 2014 | Walter Russell Mead
    Serbias government is commissioning a statue to honor Gavrilo Princip, the boy-assassin of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Novosti, Serbias largest newspaper, revealed this week. To avoid any speculation about its intended symbolism, the statue will be erected atop the Belgrade Fortress on June 28, the 100th anniversary of Princips fateful gunshots, which, conventional wisdom holds, ushered in World War I. Serbia and the Serbian people are thus righting a wrong committed against Princip, who has never before had a monument dedicated to him, writes the pro-government paper.
  • Major international conference: 'THE POSITION OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN THE HISTORY OF EUROPE'

    01/13/2014 7:33:27 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 18 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | January 2014 | University of Sarajevo and Centenary News
    Academics of the University of Sarajevo announce the [WWI] conference Aleksandra' Note: I have only one question at this time: Will Serbia's position be represented at this World War One conference in Sarajevo in June of 2014, and will Serbs be present at this conference? Sincerely, Aleksandra Rebic ***** A major international conference about the First World War will see 120 scholars from 28 countries meet in Sarajevo in 2014. The conference, The Position of the First World War in the History of Europe, will be held on the 19th-21st June 2014 at the University of Sarajevo. Scholars from 26...
  • Letter "reveals WWI plans one year before assassination"

    01/09/2014 6:39:29 AM PST · by Ravnagora · 16 replies
    B92 ^ | January 7, 2014 | B92
    ANDRIĆGRAD -- Plans for the start of World War I existed 13 months before the Sarajevo assassination and 14 months before Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia.The Serbian Kingdom soldiers are seen during the Battle of Kolubara (Wikipedia) This can be inferred from a copy of the letter that Director of the Archives of Serbia Miroslav Perišić presented in Andrićgrad, in the RS, Bosnia. Governor of Bosnia-Herzegovina Oskar Potiorek sent this letter to the then Minister of Austria-Hungary Bilinski on May 28, 1913, and its copy was made public at the history department of Kamengrad (Andrićgrad) on Sunday. Perišić noted that...
  • History stutters when repeating itself. What it tells us is clear only if we pay attention.

    01/06/2014 12:31:28 PM PST · by DanMiller · 2 replies
    Dan Miller's Blog ^ | January 6, 2013 | Dan Miller
    Unless we read and understand history we lack sufficient knowledge to avoid repetition of its worst events. Barbara TuchmanMultiple tips of the hat to NEO at Nebraska Energy Observer for calling my attention to this video of which I had previously been unaware. Is the video one hundred percent faithful to Barbara Tuchman's book titled Guns of August? Videos rarely if ever are and this video goes well past August of 1914, the first month of the war,and the events leading up to it. Still, it presents her theses reasonably well.It's an hour and forty minutes long -- shorter than...
  • THE GREAT RETREAT, SERBIA 1915

    12/31/2013 8:21:33 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 3 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | December 31, 2013 | Aleksandra Rebic / M.I. Tatham
    "Night March of the Serbian Army" French WWI postcard Aleksandra's Note:As a lovely, sparkling snow falls steadily over Chicagoland on this last day of 2013, December 31st, it seems most appropriate to pay tribute to those Serb military forces and civilians who embarked on a now legendary exodus from Serbia in the late fall and winter of 1915/1916 southward through Montenegro and Albania to the coast of the Adriatic Sea. The Great Serbian Retreat, also known as the "Albanian Golgotha", was an extraordinary human event in the history of the 20th Century. Though it was a retreat, seen by the...
  • War in the Trenches (Yale Online Lecture on WWI, John Merriman - video at link)

    12/31/2013 11:22:13 AM PST · by Titus-Maximus · 18 replies
    Yale Online ^ | Nov 2008 | John Merriman
    hist-202: European Civilization, 1648-1945 Lecture 17 - War in the Trenches [November 3, 2008] Chapter 1. The Failure of the Schlieffen Plan: The Battle of the Marne [00:00:00] Professor John Merriman: We're going to talk about the war today. Let's do that. I assume that you guys all saw Paths of Glory, so I'm going to talk about the mutinies in a while. Jay Winter is going to talk about essentially the Great War in modern memory. To make a nice transition to his lecture, I'm going to end with something that he wrote about how reality and art came...
  • THE MIRACLE OF THE KOLUBARA!

    11/16/2013 10:13:16 AM PST · by Ravnagora · 12 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | 1983/2011-2013 | Paul Pavlovich
    Legendary Serbian General Zivojin Misich The Miracle of Kolubara River 'Men still talk of the miracle of the Marne, where there is little that is miraculous. There would be more justification in talking of the miracle of the Kolubara.' British Official History of World War I ***** "'Only the passing of two or three centuries are needed to make the glorious heroism of the Serbian soldiers stand out as a legend to the generations that are to come. They will scarcely be able to believe what we have all witnessed.'" *****
  • Rare Color Photographs from the Trenches of World War I

    11/16/2013 8:51:02 AM PST · by NYer · 16 replies
    Lightbox ^ | November 15, 2013
    The wreck of a German tank, which was destroyed during a battle on the Western Front. Black and white photographs often feel more genuine than color images — more truthful, somehow — especially those depicting historical events. Much of that perceived authenticity derives from the fact that black and white pictures seem to be, in the most positive way, far simpler than their color counterparts. The world itself (we like to tell ourselves) was simpler in the latter part of 19th century, and in the earliest decades of the 20th. It was only when human experience began to accelerate and...
  • Soldier aged 13 fought at Somme for six weeks before mother showed War Office his birth certificate

    11/11/2013 7:08:42 AM PST · by the scotsman · 18 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 11th November 2013 | Harriet Arkell
    'A 13-year-old boy who ran away to join up fought on the front line in the First World War until his mother sent his birth certificate to the War Office and pleaded that he should be sent home. Sidney Lewis, who has been recognised as Britain's youngest soldier to serve in the Great War, enlisted with the East Surrey Regiment in August 1915, five months after his 12th birthday, and was fighting on the Somme by the age of 13. But within weeks he was ordered home to his mother, Fanny Lewis, in Tooting, south London, after she told officials...
  • Armistice Day-Let us remember our great American ally Serbia and her Heroes

    11/11/2013 7:04:03 AM PST · by Ravnagora · 10 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | November 11, 2013 | Aleksandra Rebic
    Aleksandra's Note:As the world marks Armistice Day November 11, 2013 and pays tribute to the heroes of World War One and thanks all veterans everywhere who have fought for noble and righteous causes, let us remember our great American ally Serbia, who stood up to the enemy and prevailed at great cost and sacrifice to her nation, her soldiers, and her civilians. Serbia, through all her trials and tribulations in the Great War, remained steadfastly on the side of the victorious Allies, committed to a noble cause and determined to survive and flourish despite the great efforts of the bully...
  • 'Catastrophe' by Max Hastings - magisterial and humane history of the First World War

    10/26/2013 11:49:11 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 35 replies
    The Telegraph UK ^ | October 17, 2013 | Nigel Jones
    German soldiers cross into Belgium in August 1914 Photo: RA/Lebrecht Music & Arts Like one of Field Marshal Haigs family whiskies, Max Hastings is a dram that steadily improves with age. His own trenchant views on war, and caustic opinions of the commanders who ran them, tended to obtrude too obviously in his early works, suggesting that if only he had been present at key military conferences costly errors would have been avoided. However, Hastingss recent massive volumes on his specialist subject, the Second World War, have shown why his position as Britains leading military historian is now unassailable. They...
  • Two unknown soldiers (discovered in the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps)

    10/19/2013 6:48:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 22 replies
    Economist ^ | October 9, 2013
    THE BLACK stain on the ice was instantly recognisable. The technician checking a tarpaulin stretched over a section of the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alpsan experimental attempt to slow the melting quickly called in a rescue party. The block of ice was airlifted to the nearby city of Vicenza. Inside were two soldiers who had fallen at the Battle of Presena in May 1918 and were buried in a crevasse.Their uniforms and their location indicated that they could well have been Kaiserschtzen, specialised mountain troops who fought on behalf of the Austro-Hungarian Empire to defend these mountains from...
  • The man who started the First World War

    09/09/2013 2:08:36 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 21 replies
    The Telegraph UK ^ | August 30, 2013 | Tim Butcher
    Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife descend the steps of the City Hall, Sarajevo, and innocent bystander Ferdinand Behr, inset Photo: IWM History has not been kind to the teenager who triggered the First World War by assassinating Archduke Franz Ferdinand on a sunny Sunday morning in Sarajevo. So colossal was the impact of his actions and so modest his backwoodsman background that the story of Gavrilo Princip has often been overlooked, misrepresented and misunderstood. Muddled theories, often as batty as they are unverifiable, have circulated ever since Princip fired his Browning 9mm pistol on June 28,...
  • Extraordinary chivalry of British PoW who returned to German prison after visiting dying mother

    09/03/2013 7:14:35 PM PDT · by the scotsman · 18 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 4th September 2013 | Yahoo News
    'A British PoW captured by the Germans in World War I was freed to see his dying mother - but went back to the prison camp after giving the Kaiser 'his word' he would return. Capt Robert Campbell, aged 29, was gravely injured and captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp, the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II, begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time....
  • Revealed: Extraordinary story of British WWI captain released by Kaiser from German prison camp

    09/03/2013 3:56:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 24 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 3, 2013
    A British soldier was freed from a German POW camp during World War One to see his dying mother - and kept his promise to the Kaiser by returning, historians have discovered. Captain Robert Campbell, aged 29, was captured just weeks after Britain declared war on Germany in July, 1914. But after two years in Magdeburg Prisoner of War Camp the British officer received word from home his mother Louise Campbell was close to death. He speculatively wrote to Kaiser Wilhelm II begging to be allowed home to visit his mother one final time. Incredibly the German leader granted the...
  • Why are no Allies paying attention to the Serbian WWI Battle of Tser victory?

    08/30/2013 12:22:31 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 23 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | August 30, 2013 | Blogger DTA on the Free Republic forum
    Monument to the Battle of Tser victory of 1914 in Serbia. Author of photo unknown at this time. Aleksandra's Note: The following comments were posted on Free Republic by Blogger DTA on the Free Republic forum. The points DTA makes are well worth noting as we near the Centennial of the Great War.Sincerely,Aleksandra Rebic*****"Austro-Hungarian POWs brought typhus fever to Serbia. By the end of 1914, 200,000 Serbs were dead. The typhus fever tragedy continued into 1915. It was Austro-Hungarian WMD [Weapons of Mass Destruction] of the time. "The Battle of Tser was the first Allied victory in WW1. It is...
  • Serbia marks anniversary of first Allied victory of WWI [CER]

    08/21/2013 3:24:46 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 7 replies
    The Tekeriš memorial (BetaMUP) The Serbian army won the battle - the first Allied victory over the Central Powers in the First World War. The Austro-Hungarian army launched its attack on Serbia from Bosnia-Herzegovina on August 12, 1914 and went on to take the town of Šabac, but the Serbian forces made a strong stand at Mt. Cer, 35 kilometers from the city. The first big confrontation occurred in the night between August 15 and 16 near the village of Tekeriš, and the two armies continued to fight through August 20 along a 50-kilometer-wide front. The Austro-Hungarian forces, commanded by...
  • Unseen World War I Photos: German Trenches

    08/08/2013 2:13:46 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 47 replies
    boingboing ^ | Dean Putney
    The following photos were taken from 1914-1918 by my great-grandfather Lt. Walter Koessler during his time as a German officer in the first World War. They're part of a collection of over a thousand photos, stereographs and their negatives that my family has been saving for a century. This is an unusually large and complete collection, and I've taken on the task of preserving it and printing it so other people can experience this history too. These photos have never been published before.
  • An Empire's Unreasonable Demands guarantee World War One

    08/06/2013 9:13:25 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 14 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | August 6, 2013 | Aleksandra Rebic
    THE IMPOSSIBLE AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN ULTIMATUM TO SERBIA IN 1914Aleksandra's Note: What follows is the impossible ultimatum presented to the Serbian government by Austria-Hungary on July 23, 1914, just over 3 weeks after the June 28th assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Fair historians have assessed this ultimatum as being both unreasonable and, more importantly, clearly intended to set Serbia up to fail to meet the demands, thus giving the green light for the war against the Serbs the Empire had been planning all along. All dates indicated are according to the current [Gregorian] calendar. The "old calendar" [Julian] date...
  • Russia's martyred Tsar Nicholas II Depicted in Serbian Graffiti

    07/17/2013 12:20:47 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 16 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | February 12, 2013 / July 17, 2013 | Paul Gilbert
    Graffiti portrait of Russian Emperor Nicholas II on Ulitsa (Street) Tsara Nikolaja II in the Vrachar district of Belgrade, Serbia. Artist unknown. Aleksandra's Note:On this day, July 17, in 1918, the Communists murdered Russian Tsar Nicholas II Romanov and his family. Tsar Nicholas II did not live to see the end of the First World War or Serbia's glorious victory in that war.Sincerely,Aleksandra Rebic**** By Paul Gilbert: A rare historical figure is the subject of a graffiti drawing in Belgrade, Serbia. An enormous image of Emperor Nicholas II can now be found on Ulitsa Tsara Nikolaja II, in the Vrachapy...
  • Pictures of military science from 1913

    07/17/2013 8:16:57 AM PDT · by DFG · 37 replies
    Daily Mail UK ^ | 07/16/2013 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A fascinating collection of illustrations shows how America keenly observed Britain and Germany as the countries prepared for the first world war - long before the United States was drawn into battle. In 1913, before WWI even began, military scientists watched from across the Atlantic as the rival nations raced to build more efficient and effective weapons in a bid to control sea, sky and land. The images, published originally by the magazine Scientific American in 1913 and again on its website this week, mostly depict these weapons, though some of the drawings show mistaken assumptions about how a war...
  • Rare 3D Camera Found Containing Photos from WWI

    07/07/2013 5:48:13 AM PDT · by NYer · 42 replies
    io9 ^ | July 5, 2013
    SWhile visiting an estate in Ontario's Niagara Falls two years ago, a film enthusiast stumbled upon a rare World War I Richard Verascope stereo camera previously owned by the French Army. Here's what he found inside. The verascope camera, which was purchased by A Nerd's World's Chris Hughes, was found in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. The antique had been in the possession of an elderly man who was clearing out his camera collection in preparation for retirement. S"Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers...
  • Some 3D Photos of World War I from Rare, Vintage Stereo Camera

    07/04/2013 7:30:55 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 30 replies
    A Nerd's World ^ | circa, WWI | A Nerd's World
    Rare 3D Camera Found Containing Photos from WWI "One cold morning last year, we attended an estate in the Niagara Falls where we were fortunate enough to come across and purchase a rare World War I Richard Verascope stereo camera previously owned by the French Army. The camera is in pristine condition and included the original leather carrying case and glass slides. Each slide is a piece of history in photographic form and I get shivers every time I place a glass slide into the 3D stereo viewer. Only at A Nerds World 986 Bathurst street can you see the...
  • THE SARAJEVO ASSASSINATION JUNE 28, 1914-A Day of Death and Martyrs that would change the world

    06/28/2013 3:16:25 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 12 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | June 28, 2013 | Aleksandra Rebic
    Field of Kosovo Peonies / Painting by Nadezda Petrovic "...A century later, we still do not know with certainty who knew what, and when they knew it."David FromkinJune 28th is a sacred day in Serbian history. It is on this day, "Vidovdan", many years ago, that the Christian Serbs, under the command of their beloved leader St. Lazar, sacrificed their entire army of 70,000 men on the fields of Kosovo, fighting against the Ottoman Turks, the Islamic army that was pushing into the Balkans and into the heart of Europe. That was 1389, and the beginning of Turkish rule over...
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE WORLD CHANGED FOREVER - JUNE 27.

    06/27/2013 5:50:27 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 3 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | June 27, 2013 | Aleksandra Rebic
    June 27, 2013 By Aleksandra Aleksandra's Note: Today is Thursday, June 27, 2013. Exactly 99 years ago today was the day before everything in the world changed forever. History tells us that it was a beautiful summer in 1914 - everything a summer should be. The peaceful atmosphere in Europe had only 24 hours left. The next day, June 28, 1914 was Vidovdan, a most sacred day in Serbian history. It was also the day that an Austrian Archduke and his wife would come visiting and go for a carriage ride in a city in Bosnia. It was a day...
  • Obama Uses 1917 Espionage Act to Go After Reporters

    05/27/2013 3:27:18 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 35 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 27, 2013 | Michael Barone
    There is one problem with the entirely justified if self-interested media squawking about the Justice Department snooping into the phone records of multiple Associated Press reporters and Fox News's James Rosen. The problem is that what the AP reporters and Rosen did arguably violates the letter of the law. The search warrant in the Rosen case cites Section 793(d) of Title 18 of the U.S. Code. Section 793(d) says that a person lawfully in possession of information that the government has classified as secret who turns it over to someone not lawfully entitled to posses it has committed a crime....