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Keyword: xplanets

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  • Researchers discover a system with three Earth-sized planets

    06/08/2018 9:54:31 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 8, 2018 | Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias
    Credit: Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias __________________________________________________________________________ The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of Oviedo present today the discovery of two new planetary systems, one of them hosting three planets the same size as the Earth. The information about these new exoplanets has been obtained from the data collected by the K2 mission of NASA's Kepler satellite, which started in November 2013. The work, which will be published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), reveals the existence of two new planetary systems detected from the eclipses they produce in the stellar...
  • No Need for Planet Nine? Small Objects' Gravity Could Explain Weird Orbits

    06/05/2018 12:03:18 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 36 replies
    Space.com ^ | Nola Taylor Redd,
    The Kuiper Belt, the region immediately beyond Neptune, harbors TNOs of many sizes. The largest is Pluto, which was discovered more than 60 years before any of the others. Some TNOs are "detached objects," which orbit so far from the sun that they're not appreciably affected by the gravity of Neptune or any other known planet. Perhaps the most famous of these is Sedna, which takes 11,400 years to make a single orbit and never comes closer to the sun than 20 times farther out than Pluto. In 2016, astronomers Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown announced that a distant undiscovered...
  • Pluto has dunes, but they're not made of sand

    06/01/2018 6:44:44 PM PDT · by ETL · 27 replies
    Space.com ^ | May 31, 2018 | Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer
    Pluto is an uncanny-valley world, with landscapes and vistas that seem strikingly similar to those of Earth — until you take a closer look. NASA's New Horizons mission, which flew by the dwarf planet in July 2015, found that Pluto has towering mountains, but of water ice rather than rock; vast plains of frozen nitrogen and other exotic materials; and blue skies provided by a wispy atmosphere that contains no appreciable oxygen. And now, a new study reveals another alien parallel: Pluto has an extensive dune system, but the grains that make up the wind-blown mounds are certainly not sand....
  • WikiLeaks podesta emails show that they are already communicating with extraterrestrials ( no joke!)

    05/24/2018 6:34:36 PM PDT · by MNDude · 108 replies
    email for John Podesta (c/o Eryn Sepp) from Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell requesting meeting From:terribillionairs@aol.com To: john.podesta@gmail.com, eryn_m_sepp@who.eop.gov, eryn.sepp@gmail.com Date: 2014-10-01 09:35 Subject: email for John Podesta (c/o Eryn Sepp) from Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell requesting meeting RE: Apollo 14 Astronaut Edgar Mitchell requests meeting with John Podesta to discuss Disclosure Hugs Eryn, Dr. Edgar Mitchell asks that I write to Mr. Podesta and you requesting his meeting in Washington, DC with John to discuss Disclosure and zero point energy. As John is aware, more than 20 countries including the Vatican have released top secret papers discussing extraterrestrial...
  • Mysterious 'Planet Nine' gets more evidence from weird space rock

    05/21/2018 2:30:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    Fox News ^ | May 21, 2018 | Elizabeth Howell, Space.com
    The solar system just got a bit stranger. As astronomers continue their ongoing quest to find the elusive Planet Nine, a team found a space rock that lends credence to the idea that a huge super-Earth planet really exists in the outer reaches of our solar system. The newfound asteroid, called 2015 BP519, adds to a growing body of evidence about little worlds in the solar system being perturbed by something big. Astronomers detailed its discovery and description in a new paper, adding that its bizarre angle of its orbit gives more weight to the idea that a big planet...
  • It’s full of stars! NASA’s planet-hunting TESS probe sends back its first test image

    05/18/2018 8:01:22 PM PDT · by Simon Green · 21 replies
    Geekwire ^ | 05/18/18 | Alan Boyle
    One month after its launch, NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has sent back an initial test image that shows more than 200,000 stars in the southern sky. TESS’ image was taken by one of its cameras with a two-second exposure. The picture is centered on the constellation Centaurus, with the edge of the dark Coalsack Nebula at upper right and the star Beta Centauri prominent along the lower edge. The picture provides only a hint of what TESS will be seeing once it starts delivering science-quality images next month. When all four wide-field cameras are in operation, TESS’ images...
  • The outer space octopus theory

    05/16/2018 11:08:47 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 48 replies
    Hot Air ^ | 8:41 pm on May 16, 2018 | Jazz Shaw
    Another scientific study has been released offering the controversial claim that there’s a decent chance the octopus (and the rest of the cephalopods) arrived on Earth in the form of frozen eggs 250 million years ago and actually evolved on another world. … This wasn’t the first group to suggest it. In 2015 another research group reached a similar conclusion. The more you read into it, the less crazy it sounds. As we’ve studied the various animals on the planet in ever deeper detail, the octopus really doesn’t seem to fit in with everything else. They’re an invertebrate, but they...
  • Pros and Cons of Various Methods of Interstellar Travel

    05/14/2018 11:08:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 44 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Matt Williams
    It’s a staple of science fiction.... the idea of sending out spaceships with colonists and transplanting the seed of humanity among the stars. Between discovering new worlds, becoming an interstellar species, and maybe even finding extra-terrestrial civilizations, the dream of spreading beyond the Solar System is one that can’t become reality soon enough! For decades, scientists have contemplated how humanity might one-day reach achieve this lofty goal. And the range of concepts they have come up with present a whole lot of pros and cons. These pros and cons were raised in a recent study by Martin Braddock, a member...
  • This May Be the Best Evidence Yet of a Water Plume on Jupiter's Moon Europa

    05/14/2018 10:23:16 AM PDT · by Simon Green · 16 replies
    Space.com ^ | 05/14/18 | Mike Wall,
    The case for a giant plume of water vapor wafting from Jupiter's potentially life-supporting moon Europa just got a lot stronger. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted tantalizing signs of such a plume multiple times over the past half decade, but those measurements were near the limits of the powerful instrument's sensitivity. Now, researchers report in a new study that NASA's Galileo Jupiter probe, which orbited the planet from 1995 to 2003, also detected a likely Europa plume, during a close flyby of the icy moon in 1997. The newly analyzed Galileo data provides "compelling independent evidence that there seems...
  • Dyson Spheres, The Ultimate Alien Megastructures, Are Missing From The Galaxy

    05/04/2018 5:48:07 AM PDT · by C19fan · 77 replies
    Fortune ^ | May 3, 2018 | Ethan Siegel
    Perhaps the greatest 'holy grail' in all of astronomy is the search for life, and particularly intelligent life, beyond Earth. Given that life arose so plentifully and easily here on our home planet, and that the ingredients for life are everywhere we look throughout the Universe, it seems like a foregone conclusion that we wouldn't be alone. The Milky Way, all on its own, has approximately 400 billion stars, each with its own unique history and chances for life to have arisen. Despite how technologically advanced humans have become, SETI searches have all come up empty, perhaps implying that technologically...
  • "Mars Trace Gas Orbiter begins search for methane" The John Batchelor Show with Robert Zimmerman

    04/27/2018 12:09:56 PM PDT · by Voption · 7 replies
    John Batchelor Show/WABC Radio New York ^ | April 27, 2018 | John Batchelor/Robert Zimmerman
    Segment 1 mp3 podcast [13:27 total]; "Europe’s Trace Gas Orbiter has released its first image after reaching its planned science orbit...Martian geology from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter... moving-images from the surface of Comet 67P...simulating super-nova explosions--are neutrino's the key?"
  • Uranus Smells Like Rotten Eggs

    04/23/2018 8:12:33 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 62 replies
    Space.com ^ | April 23, 2018 11:00am ET | Mike Wall,
    Researchers have long wondered about the composition of the clouds high up in Uranus' sky — specifically, whether they're dominated by ammonia ice, as at Jupiter and Saturn, or by hydrogen sulfide ice. The answer has proved elusive, because it's tough to make observations with the required detail on distant Uranus. (Not only are Jupiter and Saturn closer to Earth, they have also hosted dedicated orbiter missions. Uranus has been visited just once — a brief flyby by NASA's Voyager 2 probe in January 1986.) Irwin and his colleagues studied Uranus' air using the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS), an...
  • SpaceX Does it Again; Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)launched

    04/18/2018 5:37:08 PM PDT · by Voption · 3 replies
    SpaceX ^ | April 18, 2018, 6:51 p.m. EDT | Elon Musk
    "SpaceX launched NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) on Wednesday, April 18 from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The launch occurred at 6:51 p.m. EDT, or 22:51 UTC. TESS was deployed into a highly elliptical orbit approximately 49 minutes after launch. Following stage separation, SpaceX successfully landed Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Look at This Fascinating Variety of Planet-Forming Disks Around Other Stars

    04/13/2018 6:44:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has released a stunning collection of images of the circumstellar discs that surround young stars. The images were captured with the SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch) instrument on the ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. We’ve been looking at images of circumstellar disks for quite some time, but this collection reveals the fascinating variety of shapes an sizes that these disks can take.
  • Escape from Proxima b

    04/16/2018 1:36:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 4/16/18 | Abraham Loeb
    A civilization in the habitable zone of a dwarf star like Proxima Centauri might find it hard to get into interstellar space with conventional rocketsAlmost all space missions launched so far by our civilization have been based on chemical propulsion. The fundamental limitation here is easy to understand: a rocket is pushed forward by ejecting burnt fuel gases backwards through its exhaust. The characteristic composition and temperature of the burnt fuel set the exhaust speed to a typical value of a few kilometers per second. Momentum conservation implies that the terminal speed of the rocket is given by this exhaust...
  • Substantial Lack Of Phosphorus In The Universe Makes Finding Alien Life Unlikely

    04/05/2018 11:49:13 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 56 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 4/5/18 | Allan Adamson
    Amid efforts to find alien life, scientists have not yet confirmed the existence of an extraterrestrial civilization. Findings of a new study suggest this has something do with the element phosphorus lacking in the cosmos. Life-Giving PhosphorusPhosphorus is the 11th most common element on Earth, and it is fundamental to all living things. Phosphorus is one of only six chemical elements on our planet that organisms depend on. "[Phosphorus] helps form the backbone of the long chains of nucleotides that create RNA and DNA; it is part of the phospholipids in cell membranes; and is a building block of the...
  • The Alien Observatory --"We May Soon Discover Worlds That Host Lifeforms with Strange...

    04/02/2018 6:23:28 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    In 2016, NASA sequenced DNA in space for the first time, but alien life, we may soon discover, may be vastly different on other planets and moons, particularly as we expand our efforts to explore ocean worlds with our solar system and beyond. “Most strategies for life detection rely upon finding features known to be associated with Earth's life, such as particular classes of molecules,” the researchers wrote. DNA and RNA are the building blocks of life on Earth, but the molecules of life might differ substantially on another planet. A new paper by scientists at Georgetown University, published online...
  • Hunting galaxies in Leo the Lion

    04/01/2018 4:56:21 AM PDT · by SandRat · 25 replies
    Twitter Email Print Save Leo the Lion is one of the more recognizable constellations in the April sky. It is also a great place to point a telescope and try your hand at deep sky observing. The “deep sky” is what astronomers call the realm beyond our solar system; it is populated with galaxies, nebulae and star clusters in abundance. As winter turns to spring, our evening sky turns away from the plane of the Milky Way. Our view is directed into deep space where we find external galaxies unhindered by the obscuring gas and dust of our own galaxy....
  • Interstellar Trade Is Possible

    03/16/2018 9:36:20 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 58 replies
    Tough SF ^ | 3/21/17
    Interstellar Trade Is Possible In this post, we will detail a method for developing interstellar trade using near-future technologies and commercially realistic requirements. We will then look at the various outcomes, challenges and development models that will follow the first interstellar operation. There is now a Summary at the end of the post. A tough taskTravel between stars is hard. The distances are measured in trillions of kilometers and the space between destinations is not really empty. Attempting the crossing at interplanetary speeds is ludicrously slow; the only way is to reach velocities measured in percentages of the speed of...
  • How Did Uranus Form?

    03/09/2018 9:43:05 AM PST · by Simon Green · 83 replies
    Space.com ^ | 03/08/18 | Nola Taylor Redd,
    Although planets surround stars in the galaxy, how they form remains a subject of debate. Despite the wealth of worlds in our own solar system, scientists still aren't certain how planets are built. Currently, two theories are duking it out for the role of champion. The first and most widely accepted, core accretion, works well with the formation of the terrestrial planets but has problems with giant planets such as Uranus. The second, the disk instability method, may account for the creation of giant planets. "What separates the ice giants from the gas giants is their formation history: during...