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To: Diana in Wisconsin; All
Help me with a mystery. I live in East Central North Carolina. Property has a pond and used to be rural, but now surrounded by houses. Have seen everything from foxes to deer to rats and even a beaver once. Last March, something was chewing on some trees we planted by the pond. I got some wire around them after I noticed, but what the heck could it have been?

I am more than half Yankee, so I suspected a beaver, but a local friend whose family has been here for generations asked me what is was. I told him if you don't know, I sure don't.

If you have any ideas, please let me know. The wire has stopped the problem but I expect to lose the first tree.

Click on the pictures to enlarge.

tree1

tree2

tree3


20 posted on 12/07/2019 8:11:02 AM PST by RightGeek (FUBO and the donkey you rode in on)
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To: RightGeek

Beaver.


22 posted on 12/07/2019 8:12:29 AM PST by mad_as_he$$
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To: RightGeek

Beaver, definitely.


23 posted on 12/07/2019 8:14:50 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (Baseball players, gangsters and musicians are remembered. But journalists are forgotten.)
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To: RightGeek
Not strictly gardening, but I had to laugh. "Hay Trump"


24 posted on 12/07/2019 8:15:26 AM PST by RightGeek (FUBO and the donkey you rode in on)
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To: RightGeek

I can’t say what caused that without a closer look at the teeth marks. But I can tell you a way to save your tree.

Have you ever tried your hand at grafting?

There’s a trick for saving girdled trees, called a bridge graft. Basically, you take a piece of fresh bark, or a nice springy twig, and graft one end to the living bark at the bottom of the wound, and the other end to the top. Do several per tree, in case some don’t take.

Here’s a good how-to guide: http://www.ladybug.uconn.edu/FactSheets/trees—bridge-grafting-and-inarching-.php

You can also do an image search and find some nice photos of the process.

As long as the tree can transport nutrients along these bridges, it should be able to recover.


44 posted on 12/07/2019 2:18:49 PM PST by Ellendra (A single lie on our side does more damage than a thousand lies on their side.)
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