Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Proxima Centauri's No Good, Very Bad Day
Science Daily ^ | 26 February 2018

Posted on 02/27/2018 2:25:58 AM PST by zeestephen

Astronomers have detected a massive stellar flare -- an energetic explosion of radiation -- from the closest star to our own Sun, Proxima Centauri, which occurred last March. This finding raises questions about the habitability of our Solar System's nearest exoplanetary neighbor, Proxima b [an Earth-like planet], which orbits Proxima Centauri.

(Excerpt) Read more at sciencedaily.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: astronomy; catastrophism; proximab; proximacentauri; space; xplanets
Proxima Centauri is 4.25 light years away.

When they say this happened "last March," I assume that means the Earth observation happened last March.

The huge size of this solar flare has added a huge new problem to the conditions that must exist to support life.

If these huge flares are common throughout our galaxy, they would evaporate the atmosphere and liquid water of any nearby planets, and sterilize the planet surface with lethal radiation.

1 posted on 02/27/2018 2:25:58 AM PST by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

If these huge flares are common throughout our galaxy, they would evaporate the atmosphere and liquid water of any nearby planets, and sterilize the planet surface with lethal radiation. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Well, did it do so on Proxima Centuri or are the Centaurians simply harnessing the energy of the flares?

Did Proxima Centuri have an atmosphere?

This happened aboy 5 years ago in light speed adjusted time, so when do we send water via cometary rendezvous?


2 posted on 02/27/2018 2:36:01 AM PST by Candor7 ((Obama Fascism)http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2009/05/barack_obama_the_quintessentia_1.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen
It must have happened at least 4.3 years ago or we wouldn't know about it.

Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf, which tend to be unstable flare stars. It is possible to have stable ones, but most have violent outbursts that would periodically roast any planets in their habitable zones.

Red dwarfs make up about 75% of all stars in the galaxy. Even if only a few percent of them are stable, unlike our nearest friend here, that still means billions of chances for life in our galaxy alone.
3 posted on 02/27/2018 2:40:19 AM PST by Telepathic Intruder
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen
So the pretty picture of the "dust ring" shown in the image from this article was just an echo from the flare.


4 posted on 02/27/2018 2:50:27 AM PST by InABunkerUnderSF (Back from the dead)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Telepathic Intruder
Red dwarfs make up about 75% of all stars in the galaxy. Even if only a few percent of them are stable, unlike our nearest friend here, that still means billions of chances for life in our galaxy alone.

The more I read about the function of the Moon & tidal forces of the Earth-Moon system the more I realize the criticality of the moon's existence to the formation of life on Earth. So looking for rocky planets with a stars presumed "habitable zone" is only the first step, and one that doesn't get you very far toward finding life.

5 posted on 02/27/2018 3:06:41 AM PST by Tallguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

See Ciixin Liu’s excellent description (including flares) for what life would be like living in the system in his novel “The Three Body Problem”.


6 posted on 02/27/2018 3:14:27 AM PST by PIF (They came for me and mine ... now it is your turn ...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

Laugh all you want.
When Sol and Earth are long gone in 5 billion years,
Proxima Centauri will still have 1 trillion years left.


7 posted on 02/27/2018 3:27:42 AM PST by Diogenesis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tallguy

I didn’t say a stable star’s habitable zone is the only requirement for life. A large moon could also be necessary, or maybe not. There could be a thousand requirements, or just a few. Life could evolve under completely different conditions than our own, or maybe not. A single example is not enough to form a statistical basis for determining the probability of life in the universe apart from ourselves.


8 posted on 02/27/2018 3:50:12 AM PST by Telepathic Intruder
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

*another ping*


9 posted on 02/27/2018 3:50:14 AM PST by fieldmarshaldj ("It's Slappin' Time !")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

Vin Diesel or however you spell it, he could have survived.


10 posted on 02/27/2018 3:55:11 AM PST by goldendelicious
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tallguy

“. . . the more I realize the criticality of the moon’s existence to the formation of life on Earth.”

And if that’s the case (and I tend to agree, not that I’m any expert) that tends to argue for the scarcity of life as we know it elsewhere in the universe. That’s especially so because of the size of our moon relative to the size of Earth (a complete aberration compared to what we see in the rest of the solar system); and because of the circumstances of it’s formation. As I understand it, the best theory is that the moon was formed as a piece of the proto-Earth knocked off by a collision with a massive object of just the right size that had to hit with just the right velocity and just the right glancing angle to give us the system we have now.

If all that’s the case, the chances of that happening elsewhere aren’t all that high. I’ve always thought that the argument “since there are 10^n stars in the universe, that number is so large life *has* to exist somewhere else” is flawed by the realization that if the odds of getting things right for the initiation of living systems are 10^-n, we’re it. And if the moon and it’s formation in the fashion described above are crucial, achieving a potentially viable system may well be a real long shot.


11 posted on 02/27/2018 4:08:26 AM PST by Stosh
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Stosh

Coupled with the theory that only second generation planets have the kind of atmosphere required for life as we know it, that would make life rare indeed.


12 posted on 02/27/2018 6:03:47 AM PST by gnarledmaw (Hive minded liberals worship leaders, sovereign conservatives elect servants.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Tallguy; Stosh
The Moon causes 2/3 of the tides, the Sun causes 1/3, IOW, even without the Moon, we'd have tides. And take your copies of "Rare Earth" and throw them into the recycle bin.

13 posted on 02/27/2018 8:48:10 AM PST by SunkenCiv (www.tapatalk.com/groups/godsgravesglyphs/, forum.darwincentral.org, www.gopbriefingroom.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: fieldmarshaldj; KevinDavis; annie laurie; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ...
Thanks fieldmarshaldj.
 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

14 posted on 02/27/2018 8:49:50 AM PST by SunkenCiv (www.tapatalk.com/groups/godsgravesglyphs/, forum.darwincentral.org, www.gopbriefingroom.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

Should we dispatch some fire engines?


15 posted on 02/27/2018 8:53:53 AM PST by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 75thOVI; Abathar; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; ...

16 posted on 02/27/2018 9:01:03 AM PST by SunkenCiv (www.tapatalk.com/groups/godsgravesglyphs/, forum.darwincentral.org, www.gopbriefingroom.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson