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From the article: “I find myself concerned about the retrogressive gender stereotypes in all of her novels, particularly the ineptitude of Bella. Although the novels repeatedly tell the reader that Bella is smart and strong, they repeatedly show her powerlessness. She passes out; she trips repeatedly; she is victimized three times in the first novel alone...And how is it that we’ve created a Mormon subculture in which such behavior would be seen not as a red flag, but as desirable in a boyfriend?

'Twilight.' Mormon author. Mormon themes underlying it. Even Mormons like Jana Riess has concerns about 'Twilight.' Indeed, it's a book to be concerned about. Still, you mean to tell me that Jana Riess is concerned about a theme of victimization in a book that features a vampire family? Hmmm...

Riess asks the question in this article: Would you want your daughter to date Edward Cullen?

But the question has absolutely nothing to do with the self-perceived identity of Edward-Cullen-as-vampire. Nope, it's a question having to do with how Edward Cullen treats his womenfolk...beyond blood-sucking and other nightly activities, that is!

I wonder if Mormon Riess ever wondered to ask the question, Would you want your daughter to date a vampire (in the first place)? (Aside from the other lack of redeeming qualities of the character Cullen?)

From the article: ...And how is it that we’ve created a Mormon subculture in which such behavior would be seen not as a red flag, but as desirable in a boyfriend?

Well, Riess has put her finger on something here. She unwittingly compares the Cullen vampire subculture to the Mormon subculture...I think she's onto something here.

Mormons were into the 19th century practice of blood atonement -- shedding blood for others if they committed sins not covered by Christ's blood. Vampires, of course, are into shedding blood of others, too!

Mormons eschew the cross; well, guess what: Vampires do, too!

Mormons think they'll live forever as fleshly gods; vampires think they'll live forever as fleshly god-like creatures.

1 posted on 06/09/2011 8:06:23 AM PDT by Colofornian
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To: Colofornian

“I find myself concerned about the retrogressive gender stereotypes in all of her novels”.

For the love of Mike, it’s a book and/or a movie. I’ve seen opposite views on this “literature” (I use that word very liberally, here). Edward refuses to sleep with Bella until after they marry even when Bella leads him on and tries to get him to. Allow your children to watch a movie or read material that you approve of but to analyze this “bubble-gum” like it is a Dickens book is silly.


2 posted on 06/09/2011 8:16:20 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: Colofornian
On what planet is this romantic?

Actually, a very good question. The answer is this one. As can be seen by the great many books sold in this genre, not just this series, in which the "romantic hero" behaves in these ways and (much) worse to the heroine. Since those who buy these books are largely women and girls, apparently they find such actions romantic. It's porn for women, and like male porn the other sex is likely to be completely baffled by it.

And how is it that we’ve created a Mormon subculture in which such behavior would be seen not as a red flag, but as desirable in a boyfriend?

I don't see anything particularly Mormon in this. All kinds of women go for this stuff.

Most likely explanation is an inborn tendency towards sexual submission in many, perhaps most, women. When they consciously deny any such tendencies in their real lives, due to political incorrectness, it creeps back out in their fantasy lives.

This theory also explains, IMO, a lot of the extreme hostility many feminists feel towards males. They're angry about the feelings and desires they won't even admit to themselves not being fulfilled.

3 posted on 06/09/2011 8:21:46 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Colofornian

“What’s wrong with looking for a knight in shining armor?”
______________________________________________

Nothing

but why then settle for a vampire ???

representing a jerk, a vandal, a predator ???

Bella wasnt looking for “or a knight in shining armor?”

Bella was looking for some guy who would abuse her and use her as a door mat...

Bella the charactor is self destructive...

Shes the opposite of Gov Sarah Palin...

But then Bella would have rejected a nice guy like Toded

he would be too tame and settled for Bella’s antisocial nature


4 posted on 06/09/2011 8:29:17 AM PDT by Tennessee Nana
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To: Colofornian

Todd


5 posted on 06/09/2011 8:29:48 AM PDT by Tennessee Nana
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To: Colofornian
“I find myself concerned about the retrogressive gender stereotypes in all of her novels, particularly the ineptitude of Bella. Although the novels repeatedly tell the reader that Bella is smart and strong, they repeatedly show her powerlessness. She passes out; she trips repeatedly; she is victimized three times in the first novel alone, only to be rescued by Edward. Worse than Bella’s damsel-in-distress shtick is her disturbing tendency to blame herself for everything, expose herself to serious harm, take over all the homemaking chores for a father who seems incapable of the most rudimentary standards of self-care, and sacrifice everything for a man who is moody, unpredictable, and even borderline abusive. Many women readers will also be troubled by the extreme self-abasement of Wanda in The Host, particularly one scene where she mutilates her own flesh and another where she lies to protect the man who tried to murder her. These are themes I hope do not originate with Meyer’s Mormonism. But while they are cause for concern, they do not mar the creative spirit and theological integrity of Meyer’s work.”
"Off balance, that’s the name of the game. If you want a certain kind of female to do anything for you, and follow you anywhere, keep her off balance. Be moody and unpredictable. Be as erratic as you can be, and blame her for every change. Wobble down the highway, and every five minutes yell at the person in the passenger seat. The astonishing thing is that this really does work, but it only works if your daughters are the kind of girls you shouldn’t want them to be. It only works if they have the kind of parents who let them read Twilight like it was a Nancy Drew book from the fifties or something.

The apostle Paul rebukes the kind of person who goes for this sort of thing. “For ye suffer fools gladly, seeing ye yourselves are wise. For ye suffer, if a man bring you into bondage, if a man devour you, if a man take of you, if a man exalt himself, if a man smite you on the face” (2 Cor. 11:19-20). A daughter (or a wife) might be attracted to this kind of toying-with-rape lit for several different reasons. First, it might be all she knows—she grew up with and around abusive males. She might think that “this is just the way it is.” And the other reason might be that she is surrounded by passivity, males with all the backbone of a peeled banana, and she is so hungry for something hard that she falls for abuser-hard. Either way, the results are sick and twisted."
-- from the thread Twilight #8 (Christian commentary on the Chapter 8 of the first book in the series)

See related thread:
Mormon Bookstore Unshelves Twilight Series, Despite Meyer's Sex=Bad Message
8 posted on 06/09/2011 8:35:05 AM PDT by Alex Murphy (Posting news feeds, making eyes bleed: he's hated on seven continents)
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To: Colofornian

The best part of the article is the stereotypes.

All mormom women love these books.
“She is, after all, one of our own, and we are as proud of her success as we would be if our own biological sister suddenly became a superstar.”
Bullcrap. I live in Utah and I am Mormon and I hear about the books and movies regularly but rarely hear anybody talk about the author.

All mormons act, think, and believe the same.

All mormons who like this book must also support every premise and character flaw in the book.
I love the book “The Outsiders” and somehow that doesn’t make me pro gang banger or pro Soc.

Anybody who would read these books and accept them as a commentary on Mormon theology or some perceived Mormon subculture must be brain dead stupid.


9 posted on 06/09/2011 8:40:06 AM PDT by Rad_J
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