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Keyword: ageofsail

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  • Portuguese 400 year old shipwreck found off Cascais

    09/25/2018 8:33:34 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    bbc ^ | 24 September 2018
    The team believe the ship was returning from India when it sank sometime between 1575 and 1625. This was at the height of Portugal's spice trade with Asia. Chinese porcelain from the late 16th and early 17th centuries was also among the wreck, as were bronze artillery pieces and cowry shells - a currency used in the slave trade. Cascais municipal council said the ship was found at the start of September while dredging the mouth of the Tagus river, which runs past the resort town through Lisbon.
  • Don't Blame Columbus for All the Indians' Ills

    10/29/2002 2:08:09 AM PST · by sarcasm · 16 replies · 243+ views
    The New York Times ^ | October 29, 2002 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    uropeans first came to the Western Hemisphere armed with guns, the cross and, unknowingly, pathogens. Against the alien agents of disease, the indigenous people never had a chance. Their immune systems were unprepared to fight smallpox and measles, malaria and yellow fever.The epidemics that resulted have been well documented. What had not been clearly recognized until now, though, is that the general health of Native Americans had apparently been deteriorating for centuries before 1492.That is the conclusion of a team of anthropologists, economists and paleopathologists who have completed a wide-ranging study of the health of people living in the Western...
  • American Indians in Galway, Ireland?

    09/10/2018 8:20:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Beachcombing's Bizarre History Blog ^ | November 17, 2012 | Dr. Beach Combing
    One of the most dramatic pieces of evidence for a pre-Columbian crossing of the Atlantic is to be found in a single Latin marginalia, that is some words scribbled into the margin of a book. The sentence in question appears in a copy of the Historia rerum ubique gestarum by Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini which was published in Venice in 1477. In that work Piccolomini discusses the arrival of Indians in Europe blown from across the Atlantic at a date when America was unknown to Europeans (another post another day). Next to this passage a reader has written in Latin the...
  • Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old

    09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · by blam · 90 replies · 3,344+ views
    Sunday Gazette Mail ^ | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
    Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN — The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeleton’s teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
  • Did the ROMANS discover America? Radical theory claims sword found on Oak Island...

    12/17/2015 2:48:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 149 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | Thursday, December 17, 2015 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    The researchers are basing their claims on a number of Roman discoveries in Oak Island... As well as the stone, they found carved stones on Oak Island also 'possess a language from the ancient Levant' according to Pulitzer. Other findings include a Roman legionnaire's whistle found on Oak Island in 1901, a Roman shield 'boss' and a small Roman head sculpture found in Mexico City in 1933. Another clue, in his report, is the presence of an invasive species of plant which was once used by Romans... 'The ceremonial sword came out of that shipwreck,' he told The Boston Standard....
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • The Roman Head From Tecaxic-Calixtlahuaca, Mexico: A Review Of The Evidence

    12/18/2004 4:26:41 PM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 1,546+ views
    University Of New Mexico ^ | 4-18/22-2001 | Romeo H. Hristov/Santiago Genoves T.
    The Roman Head from Tecaxic-Calixtlahuaca, Mexico: A Review of the evidence Paper prepared for the 66th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in New Orleans, Louisiana (April 18-22, 2001). Romeo H. Hristov (b) and Santiago Genovés T. (b) (a) Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 8713 1, U.S.A. (b) Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas-UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria 04510, México, D.F., MEXICO Abstract: Since the publication of the complementary research on the apparently Roman head found in Central Mexico (Hristov, Romeo and Santiago Genovés 1999 "Mesoamerican Evidence of Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Contacts, Ancient Mesoamerica. 10 (2): 207-213) this find...
  • Romans in Brazil During the Second or Third Century?

    10/17/2004 7:47:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1,059+ views
    Mysterious Earth ^ | June 20, 2003 | "Michael"
    This is a discovery that has received little to no examination, much less validation, from the realm of mainstream archaeology, no doubt in part because Marx is not a Ph.D. archaeologist. Scouring the web for more information about this finding, I did find a reference to the discovery in an article from Dr. Elizabeth Lyding Will, an expert on Roman amphoras (clay vessels used to store and ship goods during the Roman era). Dr. Will apparently has a piece of an amphora recovered from Marx's Brazil discovery. Of it, she says: The highly publicized amphoras Robert Marx found in the...
  • Romans In Brazil During The Second Third Century?

    12/10/2003 5:37:14 PM PST · by blam · 99 replies · 7,762+ views
    Romans in Brazil During the Second or Third Century? Ex-marine and underwater explorer/archaeologist/treasure-hunter Robert Marx states rather flatly: Amongst my most notable discover[ies] was that of a 2nd century BC Roman shipwreck in the Bay of Guanabara, near Rio de Janeiro. This is a discovery that has received little to no examination, much less validation, from the realm of mainstream archaeology, no doubt in part because Marx is not a Ph.D. archaeologist. Scouring the web for more information about this finding, I did find a reference to the discovery in an article from Dr. Elizabeth Lyding Will, an expert on...
  • A Revisionist Muslim History of America (Greenfield)

    02/16/2015 8:21:36 PM PST · by Louis Foxwell · 22 replies
    Sultan Knish blog ^ | Monday, February 16, 2015 | Daniel Greenfield
    Monday, February 16, 2015 A Revisionist Muslim History of America Posted by Daniel Greenfield @ the Sultan Knish blogTurkish President Erdogan’s claim that Columbus encountered a mosque in Cuba (the explorer actually saw a rock whose shape he compared to the dome of a mosque) and a Saudi Imam claiming that Columbus had sailed to America to attack Muslims are typical of an emerging genre of Muslim revisionist history that lays claim to America based on an imaginary earlier Muslim presence here. While these examples may be laughable, Muslim historical revisionism has taken root in academia. It can be found...
  • Vikings' mysterious abandonment of Greenland was not due to climate change, study suggests

    12/07/2015 6:24:36 PM PST · by skeptoid · 47 replies
    The Washington Post via Alaska Dispatch News ^ | December 7, 2015 | Chris Mooney
    It has often been cited as one of the classic examples of how changes in climate have shaped human history. Circa the year 985, Erik the Red led 25 ships from Iceland to Greenland, launching a Norse settlement there and giving the vast ice continent the name "Greenland." Within just a few decades, the Norse -- sometimes also dubbed Vikings -- would make it to Newfoundland as well. They maintained settlements of up to a few thousand people in southwest Greenland for several centuries, keeping livestock and hunting seals, building churches whose ruins still stand today, and sending back valuable...
  • Colombian Treasure Find Could Shed Light on Spain’s Colonial Past but Spark Legal Battles

    12/05/2015 3:56:47 PM PST · by Theoria · 15 replies
    WSJ ^ | 05 Dec 2015 | Sara Schaefer Muñoz
    Spanish galleon San Jose sank more than 300 years ago in battle with British, while carrying vast cargo of gold and precious stones Colombia’s discovery of the 300-year-old, shipwrecked galleon San Jose, thought to be loaded with some $10 billion in gold and precious stones, could shed light on an important period in Spanish colonial history but also spawn legal battles over the valuable cargo. Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said his country spent two years studying historical maps, meteorology and used the latest sea-searching technology to locate the Spanish vessel, which sank during a battle in 1708 in the...
  • Remains of Conquistador Convoy Found in Mexico

    10/09/2015 1:45:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 108 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Friday, October 09, 2015 | unattributed
    In 1520, a Spanish-led supply convoy that may have consisted of as many as 550 people, including Cubans of African and Indian descent, women, and Indian allies of the Spaniards, was captured and taken to a town inhabited by the Aztec-allied Texcocanos, or Acolhuas. The town is now known as Zultepec-Tecoaque, an archaeological site east of Mexico City. Excavations have uncovered carved clay figurines of the invaders that the Texcocanos had symbolically decapitated. Human and animal bones with cut marks have also been found, indicating that the members of the convoy and their horses were actually sacrificed and eaten. The...
  • Was Christopher Columbus in Greenland 15 years before he discovered America?

    06/12/2015 3:01:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Christopher Columbus wrote that he sailed in February 1477 to an island a hundred miles beyond Tile (Iceland). This trip, which would have led him to Greenland according to the distance he mentioned, was questioned many times in the 20th century. Arguments against accepting his claim have been that ice and snow would not have allowed him to make an expedition to the North in winter, and that the details he had given about the size of the tides (26 braccia) were far too overstated to be taken seriously. Taking into consideration new research concerning the change of climate at...
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerðir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • Study: Vikings May Have Taken a Native American to Iceland

    11/26/2010 10:24:36 AM PST · by pillut48 · 92 replies
    Yahoo News/Time ^ | Fri Nov 26, 4:25 am ET | LISA ABEND
    Pity poor Leif Ericsson. The Viking explorer may well have been the first European to reach the Americas, but it is a certain Genoan sailor who gets all the glory. Thanks to evidence that has until now consisted only of bare archeological remains and a bunch of Icelandic legends, Ericsson has long been treated as a footnote in American history: no holiday, no state capitals named after him, no little ditty to remind you of the date of his voyage. But a group of Icelandic and Spanish scientists studying one mysterious genetic sequence - and one woman who's been dead...
  • First American in Europe 'was native woman kidnapped by Vikings and hauled back to Iceland...'

    11/17/2010 8:33:00 AM PST · by Albion Wilde · 87 replies · 2+ views
    Daily Mail Online (UK) ^ | November 17, 2010 | NIALL FIRTH
    A native woman kidnapped by the Vikings may have been the first American to arrive in Europe around 1,000 years ago, according to a startling new study. The discovery of a gene found in just 80 Icelanders links them with early Americans who may have been brought back to Iceland by Viking raiders. The discovery means that the female slave was in Europe five centuries before Christopher Columbus first paraded American Indians through the streets in Spain after his epic voyage of discovery in 1492...
  • Ptolemy's Geography, America and Columbus: Ancient Greeks and why maybe America was discovered

    09/25/2009 12:32:08 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 22 replies · 1,238+ views
    mlahanas.de ^ | Michael Lahanas
    Ptolemy's Geography, America and Columbus: Ancient Greeks and why maybe America was discovered Michael Lahanas Aristotle: “there is a continuity between the parts about the pillars of Hercules and the parts about India, and that in this way the ocean is one.” [As] for the rest of the distance around the inhabited earth which has not been visited by us up to the present time (because of the fact that the navigators who sailed in opposite directions never met), it is not of very great extent, if we reckon from the parallel distances that have been traversed by us... For...
  • Pre-Columbian Map of North America Could Be Authentic--Or not

    07/23/2009 4:35:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 1,214+ views
    Scientific American ^ | July 22, 2009 | Brendan Borrell
    A Danish art conservator claims that the controversial Vinland Map of America, published prior to Christopher Columbus's landfall, may not be a forgery after all. "We have so far found no reason to believe that the Vinland Map is the result of a modern forgery," says Renè Larsen of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Reuters first publicized his results last week but provided none of the skepticism being voiced by veterans in the field. The map mysteriously emerged in a Geneva bookshop in 1957 depicting a "new" and "fertile" land to the west that Viking explorer Leif Eriksson...
  • Archaeological sensation in Oestfold [ Inca remains from 11th c Norway? ]

    06/26/2007 11:34:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies · 1,285+ views
    Norway Post ^ | Tuesday, June 26, 2007 | Rolleiv Solholm (NRK)
    Norwegian arhaeologists are puzzled by a find which indicates an Inca Indian died and was buried in the Oestfold city of Sarpsborg 1000 years ago. The remains of two elderly men and a baby were discovered during work in a garden, and one of the skulls indicates that the man was an Inca Indian. There is a genetic flaw in the neck, which is believed to be limited to the Incas in Peru, says archaeologist Mona Beate Buckholm. The Norway Post suggests that maybe the Vikings travelled even more widely than hitherto believed? Why could not the Viking settlers in...