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Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • Bronze ring found in ancient fortress near Bethlehem may have belonged to Pontius Pilate

    12/02/2018 7:59:52 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 22 replies
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | Nov 30, 2018 | Nick Squires
    A 2,000-year-old bronze ring found near Bethlehem bears the name of Pontius Pilate, the Roman official who ordered Jesus Christ to be crucified, archeologists have revealed.
  • Ring of Pontius Pilate, who ordered Jesus Christ's crucifixion, discovered near Bethlehem

    12/02/2018 6:55:57 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 12/02/2018 | Stoyan Zaimov
    Researchers have deciphered an ancient inscription on a bronze ring first found 50 years ago pointing to Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who ordered Jesus Christ’s crucifixion. Haaretz reported that the ring in question was first discovered at the site of Herodion near the West Bank’s Bethlehem by professor Gideon Forster from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, shortly after the Six-Day War in 1968-69. The owner of the ring had remained a mystery for some 50 years, however, but a recent cleansing and special camera work at the Israel Antiquities Authority labs found Greek writing on the ring, which translates...
  • Pontius Pilate’s ring discovered from site near Bethlehem

    11/29/2018 7:28:32 PM PST · by bkopto · 97 replies
    World Israel News ^ | 11/29/2018 | staff
    The Israeli daily Ha’aretz is reporting that a bronze ring found 50 years ago at the Herodion excavation near Bethlehem has been discovered to bear the name of Pontius Pilate, Roman governor of Jerusalem and the man who ordered the crucifixion of Jesus, according to the New Testament. Ha’aretz reports that the name was discovered on the ring with the use of a special camera at the Israel Antiquities Authority labs. The letters on the ring spelled out in Greek writing “Pilatus.” The words surrounded a picture of a wine vessel. Hebrew University Professor Danny Schwartz told Ha’aretz that Pilatus...
  • Can You Learn Two Languages At the Same Time?

    12/02/2018 1:28:11 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 75 replies
    Brainscape ^ | Oct 2018 | Kaitlin Goodrich
    Can I Learn Two Languages at the Same Time? In short, yes, it is possible to learn two languages simultaneously. Our brains are frequently required to learn similar topics at the same time. In fact, all educational curriculum count on the fact that you should be able to process and filter information from multiple categories concurrently. Even in other situations, our brains are primed to adjust to new tasks as needed on a regular basis. Motivation matters– especially when attempting to learn two languages at once. If your only goal in studying two languages at the same time is to...
  • Genetic Study Uncovers New Path to Polynesia

    02/05/2011 4:22:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Thursday, February 3, 2011 | University of Leeds
    The islands of Polynesia were first inhabited around 3,000 years ago, but where these people came from has long been a hot topic of debate amongst scientists. The most commonly accepted view, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence as well as genetic studies, is that Pacific islanders were the latter part of a migration south and eastwards from Taiwan which began around 4,000 years ago. But the Leeds research -- published February 3 in The American Journal of Human Genetics -- has found that the link to Taiwan does not stand up to scrutiny. In fact, the DNA of current...
  • New research forces U-turn in population migration theory

    05/23/2008 10:49:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies · 142+ views
    University of Leeds ^ | May 23, 2008 | Unknown
    Research led by the University of Leeds has discovered genetic evidence that overturns existing theories about human migration into Island Southeast Asia (covering the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysian Borneo) - taking the timeline back by nearly 10,000 years. Prevailing theory suggests that the present-day populations of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) originate largely from a Neolithic expansion from Taiwan driven by rice agriculture about 4,000 years ago - the so-called "Out of Taiwan" model. However an international research team, led by the UK’s first Professor of Archaeogenetics, Martin Richards, has shown that a substantial fraction of their mitochondrial DNA lineages (inherited...
  • Australian Neuroscientist Discovers Hidden Region in Human Brain: Endorestiform Nucleus

    11/24/2018 9:55:34 AM PST · by ETL · 10 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Nov 23, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    The newly-discovered region, named the endorestiform nucleus, is located within the inferior cerebellar peduncle, an area that integrates sensory and motor information to refine our posture, balance and fine motor movements. Professor Paxinos suspected its existence three decades ago but has only now been able to see it due to better staining and imaging techniques.“The endorestiform nucleus is intriguing because it seems to be absent in the rhesus monkey and other animals that we have studied,” Professor Paxinos said.“This region could be what makes humans unique besides our larger brain size.”“I can only guess as to its function, but given...
  • Ancient dialect extinct after last speaker dies

    02/05/2010 7:30:14 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 41 replies · 824+ views
    Yahoo News/Reuters ^ | Feb 5, 2010 | Sanjib Kumar Roy
    PORT BLAIR, India (Reuters) – One of the world's oldest dialects, which traces its origins to tens of thousands of years ago, has become extinct after the last person to speak it died on a remote Indian island. Boa Sr, the 85-year-old last speaker of "Bo," was the oldest member of the Great Andamanese tribe, R.C. Kar, deputy director of Tribal Health in Andaman, told Reuters on Friday. She died last week in Port Blair, the capital of Andaman and Nicobar Islands, which were hit by a devastating tsunami in 2004. "With the death of Boa Sr and the extinction...
  • Ancient tribal language becomes extinct as last speaker dies

    02/05/2010 1:17:19 AM PST · by cold start · 34 replies · 1,308+ views
    Guardian.co.uk ^ | 4 Feb 2010 | Jonathan Watts
    Death of Boa Sr, last person fluent in the Bo language of the Andaman Islands, breaks link with 65,000-year-old culture The last speaker of an ancient tribal language has died in the Andaman Islands, breaking a 65,000-year link to one of the world's oldest cultures. Boa Sr, who lived through the 2004 tsunami, the Japanese occupation and diseases brought by British settlers, was the last native of the island chain who was fluent in Bo. Taking its name from a now-extinct tribe, Bo is one of the 10 Great Andamanese languages, which are thought to date back to pre-Neolithic human...
  • Portraits of Caligula: The Seated Figure? Joe Geranio

    04/23/2006 5:34:56 PM PDT · by Joe Geranio · 1 replies · 158+ views
    Portraits of Caligula: The Seated Figure? Joe B. Geranio Introduction: The purpose of this study is to identify the reverse figure on the consensv dupondii (See coin portrait on this page of seated figure of dupondius) , struck during the reign of the Emperor Caligula. There has been much controversy over this reverse type, which, along with portraits in the round of Caligula, will be examined in some depth. Through numismatic, literary and epigraphical evidence I will study the seated figure, which has been traditionally accepted as Augustus, and not Caligula.+ Backround Gaius Julius Caesar Germanicus was born in A.D....
  • The Unsolved Mystery of the Tunnels at Baiae

    10/04/2012 5:34:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Past Imperfect 'blog ^ | October 1, 2012 | Mike Dash
    According to legend, the sibyl traveled to Tarquin's palace bearing nine books of prophecy that set out the whole of the future of Rome. She offered the set to the king for a price so enormous that he summarily declined -- at which the prophetess went away, burned the first three of the books, and returned, offering the remaining six to Tarquin at the same price. Once again, the king refused, though less arrogantly this time, and the sibyl burned three more of the precious volumes. The third time she approached the king, he thought it wise to accede to...
  • A need for music even in cave era ('Neanderthal conservatives')

    06/25/2009 12:40:34 AM PDT · by james500 · 5 replies · 598+ views
    Boston Globe ^ | 6/25/2009 | Carolyn Y. Johnson
    We all knew that Stone Age humans were hunters and gatherers. But sculptors and flutists? Archeologists said yesterday that they had unearthed the oldest musical instruments ever found - several flutes that inhabitants of southwestern Germany laboriously carved from bone and ivory at least 35,000 years ago. The find suggests just how integral artistic expression may be to human existence: Music apparently flourished even in prehistoric days when mere survival was a full-time endeavor. Fragments of the instruments were found in a cave, amid bones from bears and mammoths and flakes of flint from a prehistoric tool shop. “There were...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 64 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • Ancient Iraqi harp reproduced by Liverpool engineers

    07/31/2005 12:01:10 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies · 1,410+ views
    A team of engineers at the University of Liverpool has helped reproduce an ancient Iraqi harp – the Lyre of Ur Engineers from the University's Lairdside Laser Engineering Centre (LLEC) employed revolutionary laser technology to engrave authentic designs onto Gulf Shell (mother of pearl) – the original material used to decorate the body of the harp. Dr Carmel Curran, who carried out the work at the LLEC, commented: "This is the first time we have laser processed this type of material and the results are remarkable. It is fantastic to be involved in the recreation of such a piece of...
  • THE SURPRISING CONNECTION BETWEEN THE MUSKOGEE LANGUAGE AND WHISKEY

    10/29/2018 7:57:30 AM PDT · by DariusBane · 45 replies
    The People of one fire ^ | 15 March 2015 | Richard Thornton
    There are today eight living Muskogean languages, Alabama, Apalachee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Florida Seminole, Koasati, Miccosukee and Oklahoma Muskogee (Mvskoke). In the past, there were at least seven more Muskogean languages, but they are now extinct. Ironically, of all these surviving Muskogean languages, Muskogee is the most aberrant. In plain English, that means that Muskogee, the language for which the Muskogean Language Family was named, is the least similar to the other languages. The origin of Muskogee’s uniqueness is a Sherlock Holmes mystery that has yet to be solved.
  • Museum Of The Bible Says 5 Of Its Most Famed Artifacts Are Fake

    10/23/2018 8:48:30 AM PDT · by Blue House Sue · 24 replies
    NPR ^ | 10/23/18 | Emily Sullivan
    The Museum of the Bible said Monday that five of its 16 famous Dead Sea Scrolls fragments are fake. A team of German experts analyzed the privately funded Washington, D.C., museum's fragments and found they had "characteristics inconsistent with ancient origin." The fragments will no longer be displayed at the museum. "Though we had hoped the testing would render different results, this is an opportunity to educate the public on the importance of verifying the authenticity of rare biblical artifacts, the elaborate testing process undertaken and our commitment to transparency," said Jeffrey Kloha, chief curatorial officer for the museum, said...
  • Scientists found common genes in different peoples of the Ural language family

    10/18/2018 10:45:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 15, 2018 | AKSON Russian Science Communication Association
    The Ural family languages are the third after Indo-European and Turkic most common in Northern Eurasia. According to linguists, the Ural family languages were built from a single proto-language 6000-4000 years old, which was divided into two large branches: Finno-Ugric and Samoyed languages. Ural-speaking peoples live on giant territories from Baltics to West Syberia and include Finns and Estonians, Karelians and Hungarians, Mordovian Erzya and Moksha, West Siberian Khanty and Mansi, Nenets and others. Do this different peoples share common roots and biological history? And how did these related languages spread over such a wide territory? This questions are addressed...
  • 6th Century Roman Law Text Discovered ... Inside Parchment Recycled as Medieval Bookbinding [tr]

    10/17/2018 10:10:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | July 25, 2017 | Theodoros Karasavvas
    By combining two imaging techniques (visible hyperspectral imaging and x-ray fluorescence), a diverse team of Northwestern University researchers has developed a new technology that gives access to medieval texts hidden in parchment re-used for ancient book-bindings, as Live Science reported. The new technology is seen by researchers as truly innovative, as it can be used to help decipher the text under the surface of other bookbinding materials. "For generations, scholars have thought this information was inaccessible, so they thought, 'Why bother?'" the study's senior researcher, Marc Walton, a senior scientist at the Northwestern University-Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific...
  • A Timeworn Scroll Reveals King Henry VII's Interests in New World Colonization

    10/17/2018 9:49:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | October 6, 2018 | Ashley Cowie
    In AD 1499 England launched its very first English-led expedition to "Terra Nova" (New World) and now researchers studying a 16th century scroll have found King Henry VII awarded William Weston, one the explorers, with... the payment of 30 British pounds sterling... equivalent of a laborers salary for six years... The information was discovered on a huge parchment dating back more than 500 years and ultraviolet light was required to reveal the hidden text said study co-researcher Evan Jones, a senior lecturer in economic and social history at the University of Bristol in a report in Live Science. In 2009,...
  • 2,000-year-old inscription spells Jerusalem as Israel does today

    10/11/2018 12:25:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Art Daily ^ | Thursday, October 11, 2018 | Agence France-Presse
    Israel unveiled Tuesday a stone pillar engraved with an ancient inscription showing that the spelling of Jerusalem in its present-day Hebrew form was already in common use some 2,000 years ago. During construction work in February in Jerusalem, archaeologists unearthed the pillar with the inscription "Hananiah son of Dodalos of Jerusalem," written in Aramaic with Hebrew letters. The Hebrew spelling of the city -- pronounced Yerushalayim -- is the same today. The stone was originally part of a Jewish potter's village dating to the second century BC near Jerusalem. The site, now inside the city, became the Roman 10th Legion's...