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Keyword: jupiter

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  • Lack of sunspots to bring record cold, warns NASA scientist

    11/13/2018 1:59:43 AM PST · by SMGFan · 91 replies
    Ice Age Now ^ | November 12, 2018
    “It could happen in a matter of months,” says Martin Mlynczak of NASA’s Langley Research Center. ________________ “The sun is entering one of the deepest Solar Minima of the Space Age,” wrote Dr Tony Phillips just six weeks ago, on 27 Sep 2018. Sunspots have been absent for most of 2018 and Earth’s upper atmosphere is responding, says Phillips, editor of spaceweather.com. Data from NASA’s TIMED satellite show that the thermosphere (the uppermost layer of air around our planet) is cooling and shrinking, literally decreasing the radius of the atmosphere. To help track the latest developments, Martin Mlynczak of NASA’s...
  • The Purported Plumes of Jupiter's Moon Europa Are Missing 'Hotspot' Engines

    10/24/2018 8:49:46 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    Space.com ^ | October 24, 2018 07:00am ET | Nola Taylor Redd,
    Plumes are common throughout the solar system. Jupiter's moon Io is constantly shooting volcanic material into the air. Saturn's icy moon Enceladus famously blasts water vapor and other material from its subsurface ocean into space via a set of geysers near the south pole. And Earth is rich in geysers, from Yellowstone National Park's Old Faithful to Iceland's Great Geysir. Firing off the gas that makes up these plumes requires an energy source, which usually heats up the ground around the plume source. Enceladus, Io and Earth all have hotspots around their geysers and volcanoes. But not Europa, as far...
  • 50-Foot-Tall Ice Spikes Cover Europa, New Study Suggests

    10/09/2018 9:45:30 AM PDT · by ETL · 25 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Oct 9, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    On Earth, the sublimation of massive ice deposits at equatorial latitudes under cold and dry conditions in the absence of any liquid melt leads to the formation of spiked and bladed textures eroded into the surface of the ice.Known as penitentes, these sublimation-sculpted blades grow to between 3 to 16 feet (1-5 m) tall, but they are restricted to high-altitude tropical and subtropical conditions, such as in the Andes.Europa, however, has the perfect conditions necessary for penitentes to form more uniformly — its surface is dominated by ice.It has the thermal conditions needed for ice to sublime without melting; and...
  • Jupiter's Icy Moon Europa Has a Really Weird Cold Spot

    09/07/2018 2:11:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    Space.com ^ | September 7, 2018 12:19pm ET | Meghan Bartels,
    Just because Jupiter's moon Europa is coated in ice doesn't mean all that ice is the same temperature. And now, scientists have mapped the hot and cold spots on the moon's surface using data gathered from Earth, with accuracy down to 125 miles (200 kilometers). While most of the temperature variations they measured can be explained by sunlight's influence on the ice, there's one unusually cold spot that is stumping the scientists behind the new research. That spot, which falls on the moon's northern hemisphere, stood out in images taken at different times of the day, which surprised the scientists....
  • Plasma Scientists Created Invisible, Whooping 'Whistlers' in a Lab

    08/19/2018 5:08:37 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    space.com ^ | August 17, 2018 07:10am ET | Rafi Letzter, Live Science Staff Writer |
    There's a sort of radio wave that bangs its way around Earth, knocking around electrons in the plasma fields of loose ions surrounding our planet and sending strange tones to radio detectors. It's called a "whistler." And now, scientists have observed bursts like this in more detail than ever before. Whistlers, typically created during certain lightning strikes, usually travel along Earth's magnetic-field lines. Humans first detected them more than a century ago, thanks to their ability to make a "whistling" sound (really more like a ghostly recording of laser blasts in a "Star Wars" movie) when picked up by a...
  • Jupiter's Moon Ganymede Generates Incredible Magnetic Waves

    08/07/2018 10:12:39 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 08/06/2018
    NASA’s Galileo spacecraft surprised scientists when it revealed that Jupiter’s moon Ganymede generated its own magnetic field. But new research shows Ganymede also creates incredibly powerful waves that rocket particles to enormous energies. Scientists revealed these huge electromagnetic waves while studying old data from Galileo, which orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003. The observations show another wild way that a moon can interact with the magnetic field of its planet. Jupiter’s radius is around 11 times that of Earth, but it is perhaps 20,000 times more magnetic. This generates an intense radiation environment around the planet. Typically, these waves around...
  • Moon pairs with brightening Mars tonight

    06/03/2018 8:03:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    Saturn will not be too far away. It will be just west of Mars and not as bright as the Red Planet. Mars is growing brighter every night. On July 27, Mars will reach opposition. This is when Earth will be directly between Mars and the sun. Therefore, Mars will look very bright and grace the sky all night. It will be brighter than Jupiter! Before Mars reaches opposition, the Earth passes directly between Saturn and the moon. This is a great time to view Saturn; it’s in the sky all night, and it is bright. Earthsky.com has a great...
  • Europa Lander May Not Have to Dig Deep to Find Signs of Life

    07/23/2018 7:32:23 PM PDT · by Simon Green · 23 replies
    Space.com ^ | 07/23/18 | Mike Wall
    If signs of life exist on Jupiter's icy moon Europa, they might not be as hard to find as scientists had thought, a new study reports. The 1,900-mile-wide (3,100 kilometers) Europa harbors a huge ocean beneath its icy shell. What's more, astronomers think this water is in contact with the moon's rocky core, making a variety of complex and intriguing chemical reactions possible. Researchers therefore regard Europa as one of the solar system's best bets to harbor alien life. Europa is also a geologically active world, so samples of the buried ocean may routinely make it to the surface...
  • Researchers Discover 12 New Moons Around Jupiter

    07/17/2018 10:10:37 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    In March 2017, Jupiter was in the perfect location to be observed using the Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, which has the Dark Energy Camera and can survey the sky for faint objects. Astronomer Scott Sheppard of the Carnegie Institution for Science and his team were using the telescope to search the edge of the solar system for signs of Planet Nine. They realized they could observe Jupiter at the same time. They would be able to tell the difference between Jupiter and the objects around it versus the distant solar system objects because any...
  • We Might Have Just Discovered 2 Dark Moons Hidden Near Uranus

    12/22/2017 6:11:50 AM PST · by Red Badger · 50 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 17 OCT 2016 | FIONA MACDONALD
    ================================================================================================================ Researchers have re-examined data captured by the Voyager 2 spacecraft back in 1986, and think they've found evidence of two never-before-seen moons hidden in the rings of Uranus. Uranus, the third largest planet in our Solar System, already has 27 moons that we know of - but these two new ones appear to orbit the planet more closely than any of its other natural satellites, and are causing wavy patterns in its closest rings. Although Saturn is the most famous ringed planet orbiting our Sun, it's not the only one, with the three other gas giants - Jupiter, Uranus,...
  • 'Cataclysmic' collision shaped Uranus' evolution

    07/03/2018 6:34:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 30 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 2, 2018 | Durham University
    The collision with Uranus of a massive object twice the size of Earth that caused the planet's unusual spin, from a high-resolution simulation using over ten million particles, coloured by their internal energy. Credit: Jacob Kegerreis/Durham University ___________________________________________________________________________ Uranus was hit by a massive object roughly twice the size of Earth that caused the planet to tilt and could explain its freezing temperatures, according to new research. Astronomers at Durham University, UK, led an international team of experts to investigate how Uranus came to be tilted on its side and what consequences a giant impact would have had on the...
  • NASA reveals stunning images of Jupiter taken by the Juno spacecraft

    06/26/2018 12:49:24 PM PDT · by Simon Green · 52 replies
    The Independant ^ | 06/25/18 | Alexandra Richards
    Nasa has released stunning images of Jupiter taken from the Juno spacecraft. The breathtaking images show swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter’s northern hemisphere. Scientists said the photos allowed them to see the planet’s weather system in greater detail. According to the space station, the brighter colours in the images represent clouds made up of ammonia and water, while the darker blue-green spirals represent cloud material "deeper in Jupiter's atmosphere." At the time Juno was about 9,600 miles from the planet's cloud tops. The Juno satellite was launched in order to improve Nasa’s understanding of the solar...
  • This May Be the Best Evidence Yet of a Water Plume on Jupiter's Moon Europa

    05/14/2018 10:23:16 AM PDT · by Simon Green · 16 replies
    Space.com ^ | 05/14/18 | Mike Wall,
    The case for a giant plume of water vapor wafting from Jupiter's potentially life-supporting moon Europa just got a lot stronger. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted tantalizing signs of such a plume multiple times over the past half decade, but those measurements were near the limits of the powerful instrument's sensitivity. Now, researchers report in a new study that NASA's Galileo Jupiter probe, which orbited the planet from 1995 to 2003, also detected a likely Europa plume, during a close flyby of the icy moon in 1997. The newly analyzed Galileo data provides "compelling independent evidence that there seems...
  • Jupiter and Venus Change Earth’s Orbit Every 405,000 Years

    05/10/2018 7:28:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 61 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 05/10/2018 | Matt Williams
    Over the course of the past 200 million years, our planet has experienced four major geological periods (the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous and Cenozoic) and one major ice age (the Pliocene-Quaternary glaciation), all of which had a drastic impact on plant and animal life, as well as effecting the course of species evolution. For decades, geologists have also understood that these changes are due in part to gradual shifts in the Earth’s orbit, which are caused by Venus and Jupiter, and repeat regularly every 405,000 years. But it was not until recently that a team of geologists and Earth scientists...
  • By Jove: Jupiter at Opposition for 2018

    05/02/2018 7:26:11 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    universetoday ^ | by David Dickinson
    That bright “star” is actually a planet, the king of them all as far as our Solar System is concerned: Jupiter. May also ushers in Jupiter observing season, as the planet reaches opposition on May 9th, rising in the east opposite to the setting Sun to the west. Jupiter now joins Venus in the dusk sky, ending the planetary drought plaguing many an evening star party. Shining a magnitude -2.5 near opposition, you can even pick Jupiter out against the deep blue daytime sky… if you know exactly where to look for it. The Moon visits Jupiter once every orbit,...
  • Wrong-Way, Daredevil Asteroid Plays 'Chicken' with Jupiter

    03/30/2017 8:13:58 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    space.com ^ | 03/29/2017 | Hanneke Weitering
    The unnamed asteroid shares Jupiter's orbital space while moving in the opposite direction as the planet, which looks like a recipe for a collision, astronomers said. Yet somehow, the asteroid has managed to safely dodge Jupiter for at least tens of thousands of laps around the sun, a new study showed. It was given the provisional designation 2015 BZ509 with the nickname "BZ." Scientists noticed that the asteroid moves in the opposite direction of every planet and 99.99 percent of asteroids orbiting the sun, in a state known as retrograde motion. ... BZ may seem like a lucky asteroid, narrowly...
  • Io Afire With Volcanoes Under Juno’s Gaze

    04/10/2018 7:33:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 5 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 04/10/2018 | Bob King
    Io boasts more than 130 active volcanoes with an estimated 400 total, making it the most volcanically active place in the Solar System. Juno used its Jovian Infrared Aurora Mapper (JIRAM) to take spectacular photographs of Io during Perijove 7 last July... Juno’s Io looks like it’s on fire. Because JIRAM sees in infrared, a form of light we sense as heat, it picked up the signatures of at least 60 hot spots on the little moon on both the sunlight side (right) and the shadowed half. Like all missions to the planets, Juno’s cameras take pictures in black and...
  • PC Lies: Google doddle of Juno Mission Team Members vs Actual Juno Mission Team Members

    07/06/2016 11:49:38 AM PDT · by Trumpinator · 12 replies
  • Juno Isn’t Exactly Where it’s Supposed To Be. The Flyby Anomaly is Back, But Why Does it Happen?

    12/01/2017 7:24:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 12/01/2017 | Matt Williams
    In the early 1960s, scientists developed the gravity-assist method, where a spacecraft would conduct a flyby of a major body in order to increase its speed. Many notable missions have used this technique, including the Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, and New Horizons missions. In the course of many of these flybys, scientists have noted an anomaly where the increase in the spacecraft’s speed did not accord with orbital models. This has come to be known as the “flyby anomaly”, which has endured despite decades of study and resisted all previous attempts at explanation. To address this, a team of researchers...
  • An even more spectacular movie of Jupiter’s storms!

    03/12/2018 12:27:29 PM PDT · by Voption · 8 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | March 12, 2018 | Robert Zimmerman
    "Cool image time! Yesterday I posted a short gif created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt, using twelve Juno images, that showed some cloud changes over time... Today, I discovered that Eichstädt has created an even more spectacular movie, which I have embedded below the fold, based on images taken during Juno’s tenth close fly-by."