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Keyword: quantumgravity

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  • The Most Powerful Gamma Ray Burst Just Corroborated General Relativity Once Again

    07/10/2020 12:12:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 10 JULY 2020 | MICHELLE STARR
    Last year, scientists detected the most energetic gamma ray burst we've ever seen. A distant galaxy spat out a colossal flare in the range of a trillion electron volts (TeV), providing invaluable new insight into the physics of these incredibly energetic events. That was pretty amazing on its own - but now astrophysicists have used the burst to perform a new, precise test of the theory of general relativity. And - quelle surprise! - this test found that the speed of light is constant in a vacuum. Relativity, once again, has passed with flying colours. The test hinges on a...
  • Astronomers Detect a Burst of Gravitational Waves From The Direction of Betelgeuse

    01/20/2020 11:01:51 AM PST · by Red Badger · 84 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 20 JAN 2020 | EVAN GOUGH, UNIVERSE TODAY
    Gravitational waves are caused by calamitous events in the Universe. Neutron stars that finally merge after circling each other for a long time can create them, and so can two black holes that collide with each other. But sometimes there's a burst of gravitational waves that doesn't have a clear cause. One such burst was detected by LIGO/VIRGO on January 14, and it came from the same region of sky that hosts the star Betelgeuse. Yeah, Betelgeuse, aka Alpha Orionis. The star that has been exhibiting some dimming behaviour recently, and is expected to go supernova at some point in...
  • An 'unknown' burst of gravitational waves just lit up Earth's detectors

    01/15/2020 3:52:50 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 126 replies
    CNET ^ | 01/14/2020 | Jackson Ryan
    Earth's gravitational wave observatories -- which hunt for ripples in the fabric of space-time -- just picked up something weird. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo detectors recorded an unknown or unanticipated "burst" of gravitational waves on Jan. 14. The gravitational waves we've detected so far usually relate to extreme cosmic events, like two black holes colliding or neutron stars finally merging after being caught in a death spiral. Burst gravitational waves have not been detected before and scientists hypothesize they may be linked to phenomena such as supernova or gamma ray bursts, producing a tiny "pop" when...
  • Time travel is possible – but only if you have an object with infinite mass

    12/13/2018 2:07:09 PM PST · by ETL · 95 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Dec 13, 2018 | Gaurav Khanna
    The concept of time travel has always captured the imagination of physicists and laypersons alike. But is it really possible? Of course it is. We're doing it right now, aren't we? We are all traveling into the future one second at a time. But that was not what you were thinking. Can we travel much further into the future? Absolutely. If we could travel close to the speed of light, or in the proximity of a black hole, time would slow down enabling us to travel arbitrarily far into the future. The really interesting question is whether we can travel...
  • What Are Quantum Gravity's Alternatives To String Theory?

    12/19/2015 7:19:11 AM PST · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Fortune ^ | December 17, 2015 | Ethan Slegel
    The Universe we know and love — with Einstein’s General Relativity as our theory of gravity and quantum field theories of the other three forces — has a problem that we don’t often talk about: it’s incomplete, and we know it. Einstein’s theory on its own is just fine, describing how matter-and-energy relate to the curvature of space-and-time. Quantum field theories on their own are fine as well, describing how particles interact and experience forces. Normally, the quantum field theory calculations are done in flat space, where spacetime isn’t curved. We can do them in the curved space described by...
  • ‘Beautiful Mind’ Mathematician John Nash Replaced Einstein’s Theory Of Relativity Days Before Death

    06/01/2015 12:19:56 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 104 replies
    The Inquisitr News ^ | May 30, 2015 | Tara West
    John Forbes Nash Jr. was a mathematical genius who had his life chronicled in the movie A Beautiful Mind. One of Nash’s colleagues says that just days before he died in a New York taxi cab accident, he had discussed his latest and possibly most brilliant discovery to date. Mathematician Cédric Villan says that Nash told him that he had replaced Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and that the new equation would further explain quantum gravity. The Daily Mail reports that on May 20, 2015, just three days before the tax cab accident that would take his life, Nash spoke to...
  • Mapping the road to quantum gravity

    04/26/2014 5:36:47 AM PDT · by onedoug · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 23 APR 2014 | Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
    The road uniting quantum field theory and general relativity -- the two great theories of modern physics -- has been impassable for 80 years. Could a tool from condensed matter physics finally help map the way?
  • String Theory, at 20, Explains It All (or Not)

    12/07/2004 10:01:55 AM PST · by snarks_when_bored · 110 replies · 2,849+ views
    The New York Times ^ | December 7, 2004 | Dennis Overbye
    December 7, 2004 String Theory, at 20, Explains It All (or Not) By DENNIS OVERBYE SPEN, Colo. - They all laughed 20 years ago. It was then that a physicist named John Schwarz jumped up on the stage during a cabaret at the physics center here and began babbling about having discovered a theory that could explain everything. By prearrangement men in white suits swooped in and carried away Dr. Schwarz, then a little-known researcher at the California Institute of Technology.Only a few of the laughing audience members knew that Dr. Schwarz was not entirely joking. He and his...
  • Time Trip - questions and answers (How widely accepted is the theory that we can travel in time?)

    12/25/2003 8:12:15 PM PST · by Momaw Nadon · 91 replies · 2,512+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, December 26, 2003 | BBC
    The Future According to Professor Paul Davies "Scientists have no doubt whatever that it is possible to build a time machine to visit the future". Since the publication of Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity in 1905, few, if any, scientists would dispute that time travel to the future is perfectly possible. According to this theory, time runs slower for a moving person than for someone who is stationary. This has been proven by experiments using very accurate atomic clocks. In theory, a traveller on a super high-speed rocket ship could fly far out into the Universe and then come back...