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Governor Palin: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
conservatives4palin ^ | 1/17/11 | Sarah Palin

Posted on 01/17/2011 12:15:29 PM PST by American Dream 246

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today is a day to reflect on the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King dedicated himself to justice and the struggles of an imperfect world. In the face of fierce opposition, he stood up for the oppressed, and he ultimately sacrificed all for equality and freedom. His was a remarkable life of love and service for all mankind. His work must continue.

With Dr. King’s faith in God and his unwavering hope in a brighter, stronger future, let us recommit today to continuing his work for a more peaceful and just nation.

- Sarah Palin


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: freepressforpalin; lutherking; martinlutherking; obama; palin; tnb
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1 posted on 01/17/2011 12:15:33 PM PST by American Dream 246
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To: American Dream 246

Waiting for cranial-deflagrative liberal reaction in 6...5...4...3...2...


2 posted on 01/17/2011 12:17:16 PM PST by Attention Surplus Disorder ("Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit smoking" - Barack Hussein Obama)
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To: American Dream 246

If you have a FB account, you should take a look at the comments some leftist dunderheads are making. They are being swatted down effectively by supporters. PDS is on full display.


3 posted on 01/17/2011 12:18:44 PM PST by Islander7 (There is no septic system so vile, so filthy, the left won't drink from to further their agenda)
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To: American Dream 246

Palin never misses a beat.

Palin 2012


4 posted on 01/17/2011 12:22:55 PM PST by Gator113 (I'm voting for Sarah Palin, Liberty, our Constitution and American Exceptionalism.)
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To: American Dream 246

Must everyone bow and grovel at the feet of this false god?


5 posted on 01/17/2011 12:26:52 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: Islander7

Where?

Here is a little of a sermon by MLK jr. that his followers would like the world to forget:

“I want you to think with me this morning from the subject: rediscovering lost values. Rediscovering lost values. There is something wrong with our world, something fundamentally and basically wrong. I don’t think we have to look too far to see that. I’m sure that most of you would agree with me in making that assertion. And when we stop to analyze the cause of our world’s ills, many things come to mind.
We begin to wonder if it is due to the fact that we don’t know enough. But it can’t be that. Because in terms of accumulated knowledge we know more today than men have known in any period of human history. We have the facts at our disposal. We know more about mathematics, about science, about social science, and philosophy, than we’ve ever known in any period of the world’s history. So it can’t be because we don’t know enough.

And then we wonder if it is due to the fact that our scientific genius lags behind. That is, if we have not made enough progress scientifically. Well then, it can’t be that. For our scientific progress over the past years has been amazing. Man through his scientific genius has been able to warp distance and place time in chains, so that today it’s possible to eat breakfast in New York City and supper in London, England. Back in about 1753 it took a letter three days to go from New York City to Washington, and today you can go from here to China in less time than that. It can’t be because man is stagnant in his scientific progress. Man’s scientific genius has been amazing.
I think we have to look much deeper than that if we are to find the real cause of man’s problems and the real cause of the world’s ills today. If we are to really find it I think we will have to look in the hearts and souls of men.

The trouble isn’t so much that we don’t know enough, but it’s as if we aren’t good enough. The trouble isn’t so much that our scientific genius lags behind, but our moral genius lags behind. The great problem facing modern man is that, that the means by which we live, have outdistanced the spiritual ends for which we live. So we find ourselves caught in a messed-up world.The problem is with man himself and man’s soul. We haven’t learned how to be just and honest and kind and true and loving. And that is the basis of our problem. The real problem is that through our scientific genius we’ve made of the world a neighborhood, but through our moral and spiritual genius we’ve failed to make of it a brotherhood. And the great danger facing us today is not so much the atomic bomb that was created by physical science. Not so much that atomic bomb that you can put in an aeroplane and drop on the heads of hundreds and thousands of people—as dangerous as that is. But the real danger confronting civilization today is that atomic bomb which lies in the hearts and souls of men, capable of exploding into the vilest of hate and into the most damaging selfishness. That’s the atomic bomb that we’ve got to fear today. Problem is with the men. Within the heart and the souls of men. That is the real basis of our problem.
My friends, all I’m trying to say is that if we are to go forward today, we’ve got to go back and rediscover some mighty precious values that we’ve left behind. That’s the only way that we would be able to make of our world a better world, and to make of this world what God wants it to be and the real purpose and meaning of it. The only way we can do it is to go back, and rediscover some mighty precious values that we’ve left behind.”

Read the rest here:
http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/primarydocuments/Vol2/540228RediscoveringLostValues.pdf


6 posted on 01/17/2011 12:27:11 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

YES!!

Now get back in line prole!


7 posted on 01/17/2011 12:28:34 PM PST by The Toll
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To: PetroniusMaximus


"On this page is the photo taken Sept. 2, 1957 of King attending the Highlander Folk School which the Communist Party operated at Monteagle, Tennessee Identified in the picture is No. 1 King, No. 2, Abner Berry, member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party and writer for the "Daily Worker," No. 3, Aubrey Williams, Communist Party agent and president of the Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) a red front organizing blacks in southern states."
8 posted on 01/17/2011 12:29:31 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: American Dream 246

If you have a FB account, you should take a look at the comments some leftist dunderheads are making. They are being swatted down effectively by supporters. PDS is on full display.


9 posted on 01/17/2011 12:35:21 PM PST by Islander7 (There is no septic system so vile, so filthy, the left won't drink from to further their agenda)
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To: American Dream 246

She’s swallowed the Glenn Beck pill, apparently.


10 posted on 01/17/2011 12:35:57 PM PST by pissant ((Bachmann 2012 - Freepmail to get on/off PING list))
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To: tuckrdout

Thanks!


11 posted on 01/17/2011 12:38:35 PM PST by Islander7 (There is no septic system so vile, so filthy, the left won't drink from to further their agenda)
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To: American Dream 246
Being a white, heterosexual Christian in 2011 is looked upon the way being a black homosexual atheist would have been looked upon in 1911.

Sarah is the face of the new American Civil Rights movement.


Frowning takes 68 muscles.
Smiling takes 6.
Pulling this trigger takes 2.
I'm lazy.

12 posted on 01/17/2011 12:38:55 PM PST by The Comedian ("Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice" - B. Goldwater)
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To: American Dream 246

What gives this racist moose killin’ bee-atch the right to even say the words “Martin Luther King”? Or Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton, or obama bin laden for that matter. sarc


13 posted on 01/17/2011 12:55:39 PM PST by Terry Mross (I voted for McCain and WASTED my vote.)
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To: American Dream 246

Towards the end of his life, it became apparent that Dr. King was not against discrimination. He was only against discrimination against blacks.

Unfortunately, King was also a Socialist. While he helped accomplish a number of great things, he also led the cause for government dependence which has become a curse upon this nation.


14 posted on 01/17/2011 12:58:53 PM PST by MBB1984
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To: Islander7

Here is more by MLK jr. On Communism:

“First I rejected their materialistic interpretation of history. Communism, avowedly secularistic and materialistic, has no place for God. This I could never accept, for as a Christian I believe that there is a creative personal power in this universe who is the ground and essence of all reality-—a power that cannot be explained in materialistic terms. History is ultimately guided by spirit, not matter.

Second, I strongly disagreed with communism’s ethical relativism. Since for the Communist there is no divine government, no absolute moral order, there are no fixed, immutable principles; consequently almost anything-force, violence, murder, lying-is a justifiable means to the “millennial” end. This type of relativism was abhorrent to me. Constructive ends can never give absolute moral justification to destructive means, because in the final analysis the end is preexistent in the mean.

Third, I opposed communism’s political totalitarianism. In communism the individual ends up in subjection to the state. True, the Marxist would argue that the state is an “interim” reality which is to be eliminated when the classless society emerges; but the state i s the end while it lasts, and man only a means to that end. And if any man’s so-called rights or liberties stand in the way of that end, they are simply swept aside. His liberties of expression, his freedom to vote, his freedom to listen to what news he likes or to choose his books are all restricted. Man becomes hardly more, in communism, than a depersonalized cog in the turning wheel of the state. This deprecation of individual freedom was objectionable to me. I am convinced now, as I was then, that man is an end because he is a child of God. Man is not made for the state; the state is made for man. To deprive man of freedom is to relegate him to the status of a thing, rather than elevate him to the status of a person. Man must never be treated as a means to the end of the state, but always as an end within himself.”


15 posted on 01/17/2011 1:00:47 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

Post again, from Dr. King’s own writings...he DID study communism...just as I have. One needs to know what others teach...Here is what he said about it...again:

“First I rejected their materialistic interpretation of history. Communism, avowedly secularistic and materialistic, has no place for God. This I could never accept, for as a Christian I believe that there is a creative personal power in this universe who is the ground and essence of all reality-—a power that cannot be explained in materialistic terms. History is ultimately guided by spirit, not matter.

Second, I strongly disagreed with communism’s ethical relativism. Since for the Communist there is no divine government, no absolute moral order, there are no fixed, immutable principles; consequently almost anything-force, violence, murder, lying-is a justifiable means to the “millennial” end. This type of relativism was abhorrent to me. Constructive ends can never give absolute moral justification to destructive means, because in the final analysis the end is preexistent in the mean.

Third, I opposed communism’s political totalitarianism. In communism the individual ends up in subjection to the state. True, the Marxist would argue that the state is an “interim” reality which is to be eliminated when the classless society emerges; but the state i s the end while it lasts, and man only a means to that end. And if any man’s so-called rights or liberties stand in the way of that end, they are simply swept aside. His liberties of expression, his freedom to vote, his freedom to listen to what news he likes or to choose his books are all restricted. Man becomes hardly more, in communism, than a depersonalized cog in the turning wheel of the state. This deprecation of individual freedom was objectionable to me. I am convinced now, as I was then, that man is an end because he is a child of God. Man is not made for the state; the state is made for man. To deprive man of freedom is to relegate him to the status of a thing, rather than elevate him to the status of a person. Man must never be treated as a means to the end of the state, but always as an end within himself.”


16 posted on 01/17/2011 1:02:13 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

And further King expounded:

“The late Archbishop of Canterbury, William Temple, referred to communism as a Christian heresy. By this he meant that communism had laid hold of certain truths which are essential parts of the Christian view of things, but that it had bound up with them concepts and practices which no Christian could ever accept or profess. Communism challenged the late Archbishop and it should challenge every Christian-as it challenged me-to a growing concern about social justice. With all of its false assumptions and evil methods, communism grew as a protest against the hardships of the underprivileged. Communism in theory emphasized a classless society, and a concern for social justice, though the world knows from sad experience that in practice it created new classes and a new lexicon of injustice.

The Christian ought always to be challenged by any protest against unfair treatment of the poor, for Christianity is itself such a protest, nowhere expressed more eloquently than in Jesus’s words: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor: he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord.”’


17 posted on 01/17/2011 1:05:46 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: tuckrdout
Here is a little of a sermon by MLK jr. that his followers would like the world to forget....

I read the sermon transcript. Reverend King made the point that we live in a God-ordered, moral universe and urged the congregation to put God before material objects, which is a sermon that I've heard (with slight variations) many times in evangelical Christian churches. Hardly subversive.

I'm well aware of Rev. King's history and don't dismiss any of his communist affiliations or personal failings. However, Rev. King was definitely a force for the legal end of institutionalized segregation in America. Sarah Palin's respectful nod to King's place in U.S. history, amplified due to his assassination at age 39, is not an approval of his murky associations and certainly does not deserve the kind of opposition some have aimed at it. Apparently PDS knows no bounds.

18 posted on 01/17/2011 1:09:59 PM PST by Jim Scott
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To: tuckrdout

Thank you for posting this—clarifying MLK’s position on communism is very important.

He nails it pretty well.


19 posted on 01/17/2011 1:11:52 PM PST by reasonisfaith (Rules will never work for radicals (liberals) because they seek chaos. And don't even know it.)
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To: pissant
She’s swallowed the Glenn Beck pill, apparently.

He started slobbering all over King on his radio show this morning...click. Same with the television if he does it tonight.

20 posted on 01/17/2011 1:17:36 PM PST by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: tuckrdout

Sounds like he did a little more than just study it.

“Communists Promoted King

A number of communists who left the party have reported they were ordered to do all within their power to support King’s activities. A black woman, Julia Brown, was a Communist in Cleveland for nine years. She said”

“We were told to promote King, to unite Negroes and Whites behind him, and to turn him into a sort of national hero . We were to look to King as the leader in this struggle, the Communists said, because he was on our side. While in the party I learned that King attended a communist training school, that several of his aides were communists and that he received funds from Communists and took directions from them. He was one of their biggest heroes.”

The U. S. Congressional Record of March 30, 1965 quotes Karl Prussian, an FBI counterspy inside the Communist Party as swearing: “At all of these (Communist Party) meetings Rev. Martin Luther King was always set forth as the individual to whom Communists should rally around... King has either been a member of, or willingly accepted support from over 60 Communist fronts... King accepted support from communist fronts , individuals and organizations which espouse communist causes.””

http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Wolves/king_jr-communist.htm


21 posted on 01/17/2011 1:20:40 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: PetroniusMaximus
Must everyone bow and grovel at the feet of this false god?

I was wondering the same thing. It's sickening to see the worship all the way around.

22 posted on 01/17/2011 1:21:13 PM PST by Borax Queen
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To: Jim Scott
I'm getting really tired of people accusing someone of PDS just because they don't happen to agree with everything Palin says. It's just childish.

Did it every occur to you that you can disagree with someone with being “deranged”.

23 posted on 01/17/2011 1:22:15 PM PST by beandog
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To: beandog
Did it ever occur to you that insinuating Sarah Palin did something wrong because she made an innocuous public statement respectful to Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King on the day set aside as a federal holiday in his name indicates an overripe desire to find fault with Palin, no matter what? I'll make it easy for you: it does.
24 posted on 01/17/2011 1:29:14 PM PST by Jim Scott
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To: reasonisfaith

Yes he does.


25 posted on 01/17/2011 1:36:30 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

Ironic that you are promoting what OTHERS say about MLK; what liars and enemies of the United States, and spies say about an American man who promotes peace, and preaches about Jesus Christ. A man who himself rejected communism. It was these forces who besmirch his reputation that had the most to lose from what MLK jr preached and taught others.

It is ironic that you bring it up on a thread about Sarah Palin, the most lied about and maligned politician today. One who also poses a threat to these very same communist powers.


26 posted on 01/17/2011 1:42:13 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: tuckrdout

Whoa, hold on there partner...

“... an American man who promotes peace, and preaches about Jesus Christ.”

***********

King Denied the Bodily Resurrection, Virgin Birth, and Deity of Jesus Christ

In the same sketch, “An Autobiography of Religious Development,” King wrote that, although he accepted the teachings of his Sunday school teachers until he was about twelve,

this uncritical attitude could not last long, for it was contrary to the very nature of my being. I had always been the questioning and precocious type. At the age of 13 I shocked my Sunday School class by denying the bodily resurrection of Jesus. From the age of thirteen on doubts began to spring forth unrelentingly.

While it is widely believed that Martin Luther King, Jr. was committed to the “Christian religion,” he was far from it. He denied some of the most fundamental components of historic Christianity. He repudiated the doctrine of the deity of Jesus, and he rejected the concept that the Lord was raised bodily from the dead. King disdained the New Testament affirmation of Christ’s virgin birth, asserting that the early Christians devised a mythological story to account for the moral uniqueness of Jesus of Nazareth. His theology has been profusely documented in The Christian News Encyclopedia.

1. In his paper “What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection,” MLK thought that in order to understand the true meaning of orthodox creedal doctrines—like the divine Sonship of Jesus, the virgin birth, and the bodily resurrection—the literal element needed to be stripped away in order to uncover the true experiential foundation beneath it.

* MLK believed that doctrine of Jesus’ deity developed due to Greek philosophical influence and because the early church saw him as the highest and the best
* MLK believed that the “virgin birth” was unscientific and untenable; like divine Sonship, this doctrine developed as a way for the early church to indicate how highly they valued the uniqueness of Jesus.
* MLK believed that the doctrine of the resurrection of Jesus was an attempt by the pre-scientific early church to symbolize the experience that they had with Jesus.

2. Read in light of the above, it is clear to me that in the paper, “The Sources of Fundamentalism and Liberalism Considered Historically and Psychologically,” MLK is self-consciously identifying himself with classical theological liberalism and rejecting the doctrines of fundamentalism.

* MLK praised theological liberalism. In addition to the denial of the doctrines of divine Sonship, the virgin birth, and the resurrection, MLK points out that there is also a denial of Scriptural inerrancy and the doctrine of the fall.

* MLK scorned theological fundamentalism. MLK seems not to believe in the direct creation of the world by God, man as being in the image of God, the historical account of Adam and Eve, the person of the Devil, the Fall, hell, the Trinity, the substitutionary atonement, and the Second Coming.

3. In his paper, “A Study of Mithraism,” MLK suggests that the doctrines of the early church grew out of the Greek mystery religions and cults which flourished at that time.

4. In an interview with Time Magazine, MLK seems to indicate that it was at Crozer Theological Seminary (the setting for the term papers quoted above) that he saw that the ministry was a framework by which he could express his philosophy of social protest.

http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Wolves/mlk_jr-exposed.htm


27 posted on 01/17/2011 1:52:50 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: PetroniusMaximus

I think this is a twisting of the faith of MLK jr.

Your argument deals with a paper King wrote in 1949...which he seems to repudiate in his 1954 sermon, “Rediscovering Lost Values”.

King was not always a born again Christian. He became a preacher as a vocation. But, his experiences with death threats, and bombed churches which killed little girls; being beaten and imprisoned, having dogs set on him; straightened out his thinking, and set his eyes on Jesus! He speakes about the long night he spent as he realised that he couldn’t depend on anyone, but Jesus to save him!

Here is another quote from a letter he wrote from Prison, that his followers should heed:

“I must make two honest confessions to you, my Christian and Jewish brothers. First, I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action”; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a “more convenient season.” Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.”


28 posted on 01/17/2011 2:15:37 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

And thus the straw men come out in force....

Salute MLK Jr. for the truths he told, and ignore the rest. He was not a god and did not wish to be regarded as such.


29 posted on 01/17/2011 2:23:02 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: tuckrdout

There’s room in there for the argument of quite a few fine points....


30 posted on 01/17/2011 2:26:15 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: PetroniusMaximus

quote:
“I have been arrested five times and 1960 put in Alabama jails. My home has been bombed twice. A day seldom passes that my family and I are not the recipients of threats of death. I have been the victim of a near fatal stabbing. So in a real sense I have been battered by the storms of persecution. I must admit that at times I have felt that I could no longer bear such a heavy burden, and have been tempted to retreat to a more quiet and serene life. But every time such a temptation appeared, something came to strengthen and sustain my determination. I have learned now that the Master’s burden is light precisely when we take his yoke upon us.”


31 posted on 01/17/2011 2:28:21 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

“Salute MLK Jr. for the truths he told, and ignore the rest. He was not a god and did not wish to be regarded as such.”

Correction...

“Be compelled to salute MLK...”


32 posted on 01/17/2011 2:30:16 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: HiTech RedNeck

“There are some who still find the cross a stumbling block, and others consider it foolishness, but I am more convinced than ever before that it is the power of God unto social and individual salvation. So like the Apostle Paul I can now humbly yet proudly say, “I bear in my body the marks of the Lord Jesus.” The suffering and agonizing moments through which I have passed over the last few years have also drawn me closer to God. More than ever before I am convinced of the reality of a personal God.”


33 posted on 01/17/2011 2:30:27 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

I believe King hit on our problem today, being a “white moderate”....isn’t a good thing! It leads to nothing but a devaluation of our rights! King knew it, and most of us on FR know it as well! King is a great example for us on how to resist Obama and his communist hoards.


34 posted on 01/17/2011 2:34:13 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: tuckrdout

Believe what you want.

The evidence is there that he was a communist sympathizer, a theological heretic and a notorious womanizer.

If he had a conversion to true Christianity he sure kept it quite. But he was quite vocal about preaching socialism, and social justice disguised in theological terminology.

There are plenty of examples of Godly and courageous black Christians to follow. MLK Jr. was not one of them.

I won’t honor him.

And I sure as h3ll won’t be forced to honor him.


35 posted on 01/17/2011 2:37:53 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: PetroniusMaximus

I hate to say it, but I don’t think I am the one believing “what I want”. I am believing what is the facts. The Bible tells us not to participate in gossip and lies, so I have learned to take a man by what he says. And No, MLK didn’t keep his conversion quiet. He stated it publically, in a sermon titled “why Jesus called a man a fool”:

“So many people have come to feel that on their own efforts they can bring in a new world, but they’ve forgotten to think about the fact that the earth is the Lord’s and the fulness thereof. And so they end up going over and over again without God.

But I tell you this morning, my friends, there’s no way to get rid of him. And all of our new knowledge will not diminish God’s being one iota. Neither the microcosmic compass of the atom nor the vast interstellar ranges of interstellar space can make God irrelevant for living in a universe, where stellar distance must be measured in light years, where stars are five hundred million million miles from the earth, where heavenly bodies travel at incredible speeds. Modern man still has to cry out with the Psalmist, “When I behold the heavens, the work of thy hands and all that thou hast created; what is man, that thou is mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou hast remembered him?”

God is still around. One day, you’re going to need him. The problems of life will begin to overwhelm you; disappointments will begin to beat upon the door of your life like a tidal wave. And if you don’t have a deep and patient faith, you aren’t going to be able to make it. I know this from my own experience. The first twenty-five years of my life were very comfortable years, very happy years; didn’t have to worry about anything. I have a marvelous mother and father. They went out of the way to provide everything for their children, basic necessities. I went right on through school, I never had to drop out to work or anything. And you know, I was about to conclude that life had been wrapped up for me in a Christmas package.

Now of course I was religious; I grew up in the church. I’m the son of a preacher, I’m the great-grandson of a preacher, and the great-great-grandson of a preacher. My father is a preacher, my grandfather was a preacher, my great-grandfather was a preacher, my only brother is a preacher, my Daddy’s brother is a preacher. So I didn’t have much choice, I guess. But I had grown up in the church, and the church meant something very real to me, but it was a kind of inherited religion and I had never felt an experience with God in the way that you must have it if you’re going to walk the lonely paths of this life. Everything was done, and if I had a problem I could always call Daddy, my earthly father; things were solved.

But one day after finishing school, I was called to a little church down in Montgomery, Alabama, and I started preaching there. Things were going well in that church; it was a marvelous experience. But one day a year later, a lady by the name of Rosa Parks decided that she wasn’t going to take it any longer. She stayed in a bus seat, and you may not remember it because it’s way back now several years, but it was the beginning of a movement where fifty thousand black men and women refused absolutely to ride the city buses. And we walked together for 381 days..... Things were going well for the first few days, but then about ten or fifteen days later, after the white people in Montgomery knew that we meant business, they started doing some nasty things. They started making nasty telephone calls, and it came to the point that some days more than forty telephone calls would come in, threatening my life, the life of my family, the life of my children. I took it for a while in a strong manner.

But I never will forget one night very late. It was around midnight. And you can have some strange experiences at midnight. I had been out meeting with the steering committee all that night. And I came home, and my wife was in the bed and I immediately crawled into bed to get some rest to get up early the next morning to try to keep things going. And immediately the telephone started ringing and I picked it up. On the other end was an ugly voice. That voice said to me, in substance, “Nigger, we are tired of you and your mess now. And if you aren’t out of this town in three days, we’re going to blow your brains out and blow up your house.”

I’d heard these things before, but for some reason that night it got to me. I turned over and I tried to go to sleep, but I couldn’t sleep. I was frustrated, bewildered. And then I got up and went back to the kitchen and I started warming some coffee, thinking that coffee would give me a little relief. And then I started thinking about many things. I pulled back on the theology and philosophy that I had just studied in the universities, trying to give philosophical and theological reasons for the existence and the reality of sin and evil, but the answer didn’t quite come there. I sat there and thought about a beautiful little daughter who had just been born about a month earlier. We have four children now, but we only had one then. She was the darling of my life. I’d come in night after night and see that little gentle smile. And I sat at that table thinking about that little girl and thinking about the fact that she could be taken away from me any minute. And I started thinking about a dedicated, devoted, and loyal wife who was over there asleep.And she could be taken from me, or I could be taken from her. And I got to the point that I couldn’t take it any longer; I was weak.

Something said to me, you can’t call on Daddy now, he’s up in Atlanta a hundred and seventy-five miles away. You can’t even call on Mama now. You’ve got to call on that something in that person that your Daddy used to tell you about. That power that can make a way out of no way. And I discovered then that religion had to become real to me and I had to know God for myself.And I bowed down over that cup of coffee—I never will forget it. And oh yes, I prayed a prayer and I prayed out loud that night.......

And I’ll tell you, I’ve seen the lightning flash. I’ve heard the thunder roll. I felt sin- breakers dashing, trying to conquer my soul. But I heard the voice of Jesus saying still to fight on. He promised never to leave me, never to leave me alone. No, never alone. No, never alone. He promised never to leave me, never to leave me alone.

And I’m going on in believing in him. You’d better know him, and know his name, and know how to call his name. You may not know philosophy. You may not be able to say with Alfred North Whitehead that he’s the Principle of Concretion. You may not be able to say with Hegel and Spinoza that he is the Absolute Whole. You may not be able to say with Plato that he’s the Architectonic Good. You may not be able to say with Aristotle that he’s the Unmoved Mover.

But sometimes you can get poetic about it if you know him. You begin to know that our brothers and sisters in distant days were right. Because they did know him as a rock in a weary land, as a shelter in the time of starving, as my water when I’m thirsty, and then my bread in a starving land. And then if you can’t even say that, sometimes you may have to say, “he’s my everything. He’s my sister and my brother. He’s my mother and my father.” If you believe it and know it, you never need walk in darkness.

Don’t be a fool. Recognize your dependence on God. As the days become dark and the nights become dreary, realize that there is a God who rules above.

And so I’m not worried about tomorrow. I get weary every now and then. The future looks difficult and dim, but I’m not worried about it ultimately because I have faith in God. Centuries ago Jeremiah raised a question, “Is there no balm in Gilead? Is there no physician there?” He raised it because he saw the good people suffering so often and the evil people prospering. Centuries later our slave foreparents came along. And they too saw the injustices of life, and had nothing to look forward to morning after morning but the rawhide whip of the overseer, long rows of cotton in the sizzling heat. But they did an amazing thing. They looked back across the centuries and they took Jeremiah’s question mark and straightened it into an exclamation point. And they could sing, “There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole. There is a balm in Gilead to heal the sin-sick soul.” And there is another stanza that I like so well: “Sometimes I feel discouraged.”

Edited for length..


36 posted on 01/17/2011 3:23:39 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: The Comedian

Well said. You’re hot here these last couple of days.


37 posted on 01/17/2011 3:38:51 PM PST by Hardastarboard (Bringing children to America without immigration documents is child abuse. Let's end it.)
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To: American Dream 246

Amen, Sister.


38 posted on 01/17/2011 3:53:50 PM PST by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
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To: PetroniusMaximus

You’re like the thin skinned Jews who complain about Christmas being a national holiday.


39 posted on 01/17/2011 8:20:08 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: HiTech RedNeck

“You’re like the thin skinned Jews who complain about Christmas being a national holiday.”

HUH???


40 posted on 01/17/2011 8:56:09 PM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: tuckrdout; PetroniusMaximus
Ironic that you are promoting what OTHERS say about MLK; what liars and enemies of the United States, and spies say about an American man who promotes peace, and preaches about Jesus Christ.

Here are some of MLK's beliefs concerning Jesus.

In a paper discussing the creation of orthodox beliefs, King argues that the virgin birth story represents a pre-scientific worldview: Christ's followers believed that Jesus's uniqueness could only be explained biologically. According to King, Jesus's early disciples saw his "spiritual life so far beyond theirs" that any attempt to explain his existence as human was inadequate. He concludes, "We of this scientific age will not explain the birth of Jesus in such unscientific terms."[v] This same type of thinking led Christ's followers to externalize their inner experience of his lasting power through the story of the bodily resurrection. Those who knew Jesus "had been captivated by the magnetic power of his personality," King writes, which led them to believe that he "could never die."[vi] The living and eternal presence they experienced was then transferred into the story of a bodily resurrection.

The orthodox attempt to explain the divinity of Jesus in terms of an inherent metaphysical substance within him seems to me quite inadequate. To say that the Christ, whose example of living we are bid to follow, is divine in an ontological sense is actually harmful and detrimental. To invest this Christ with such supernatural qualities makes the rejoinder: "Oh, well, he had a better chance for that kind of life than we can possibly have ..." So that the orthodox view of the divinity of Christ is in my mind quite readily denied. The significance of the divinity of Christ lies in the fact that his achievement is prophetic and promissory for every other true son of man who is willing to submit his will to the will and spirit of God. Christ was to be only the prototype of one among many brothers. The appearance of such a person, more divine and more human than any other, and in closest unity at once with God and man, is the most significant and hopeful event in human history. This divine quality or this unity with God was not something thrust upon Jesus from above, but it was a definite achievement through the process of moral struggle and self-abnegation. [iii]

In a paper entitled "A View of the Cross Possessing Biblical and Spiritual Justification," King describes the various different views of the meaning of the cross throughout history and then concludes: "Any doctrine which finds the meaning of atonement in the triumph of Christ over such cosmic powers as sin, death and Satan is inadequate.... If Christ by his life and death paid the full penalty of sin, there is no valid ground for repentance or moral obedience as a condition of forgiveness. The debt is paid; the penalty exacted, and there is, consequently, nothing to forgive."[xiv]

So which Jesus was MLK promoting?

1. The one from the Bible
2. Or something from his weak and sinful reasoning.
41 posted on 01/17/2011 10:57:44 PM PST by SoConPubbie
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To: HiTech RedNeck

See post #41 and read through the link (also a Freerepublic post) before you attack PetroniusMaximus.

MLK was not the Christian you think he was.


42 posted on 01/17/2011 10:59:11 PM PST by SoConPubbie
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To: SoConPubbie

Where do you get this scope into my brain to know what “sort of Christian I think MLK was”?

Did you borrow it from Karl Rove?

Haw, haw, haw.


43 posted on 01/18/2011 6:37:49 AM PST by HiTech RedNeck (I am in America but not of America (per bible: am in the world but not of it))
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To: SoConPubbie

Again, this is someone else’s spin on what King had to say, in 1949; before he got saved!

Most of us, when we were young, had ‘weak sinful reasoning’! We had radical ideas and did stupid things. Some of us were even Democrats...Michael Savage is one I think of; and secondly one of the most radical changes has been found in Jon Voight. It would not be fair to define the man by what he he said in 1973! And it is not fair to define King by what he said early on either. He grew up, he actually studied and looked at his true beliefs. He was taken through the fire, and refined—he found in the dark night, that his “resoning” and “beliefs” were lacking, and they did not give him strength. He knew that he had to go to Jesus for that strength, and he did.

He said, “But before I was a civil rights leader, I was a preacher of the gospel. This was my first calling and it still remains my greatest commitment. You know, actually all that I do in civil rights I do because I consider it a part of my ministry. I have no other ambitions in life but to achieve excellence in the Christian ministry. I don’t plan to run for any political office. I don’t plan to do anything but remain a preacher.”....

“and I’m going on believing and knowing that God is alive. You see, as long as love is around, God is alive. As long as justice is around, God is alive. There are certain conceptions of God that needed to die, but not God. You see, God is the supreme noun of life; he’s not an adjective. He is the supreme subject of life; he’s not a verb. He’s the supreme independent clause; he’s not a dependent clause. Everything else is dependent on him, but he is dependent on nothing.

One day Moses had to grapple with it and God sent him out and told him to tell the people that “I Am sent you.” And Moses wondered about it, and he said, “Well, what am I to tell the folk?” He said, “Just go on and tell them that I Am sent you. And then if you need a little more information, let them know that my first name is the same as my last, ‘I Am that I Am.’” And God is the only being in the universe that can say that “I Am,” and stop there. Whenever I say, “I am,” I have to say, “I am because of”—because of my parents, because of my environment, because of hereditary circumstances. And each of you has to say you are because of something. But God is life supreme. Now God, the power that holds the universe in the palm of his hand, is the only being that can say, “I Am,” and put a period there and never look back. And don’t be foolish enough to forget him.
You know, a lot of people are forgetting God. They haven’t done it theoretically, as others have done through their theories—postulated through the God-is-dead theology—but a lot of people just get involved in other things. (Yes) And so many people become so involved in their big bank accounts and in their beautiful expensive automobiles that they unconsciously forget God. So many people become so involved in looking at the man-made lights of the city that they forget to think about that great cosmic light that gets up early in the morning in the eastern horizon and moves with a kind of symphony of motion like a masterly queen strolling across a mansion and paints its technicolor across the blue as it moves—a light that man could never make. Some people have become so involved in looking at the skyscraping buildings of the cities that they’ve forgotten to think about the gigantic mountains, kissing the skies, as if to bathe their peaks in the lofty blue—something that man could never make. So many people have become so involved in televisions and radar that they’ve forgotten to think about the beautiful stars that bedeck the heavens like swinging lanterns of eternity, standing there like shining silvery pins sticking in the magnificent blue pincushion—something that man could never make. So many people have come to feel that on their own efforts they can bring in a new world, but they’ve forgotten to think about the fact that the earth is the Lord’s and the fulness thereof. And so they end up going over and over again without God.
But I tell you this morning, my friends, there’s no way to get rid of him. And all of our new knowledge will not diminish God’s being one iota. Neither the microcosmic compass of the atom nor the vast interstellar ranges of interstellar space can make God irrelevant for living in a universe, where stellar distance must be measured in light years, where stars are five hundred million million miles from the earth, where heavenly bodies travel at incredible speeds. Modern man still has to cry out with the Psalmist, “When I behold the heavens, the work of thy hands and all that thou hast created; what is man, that thou is mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou hast remembered him?”


44 posted on 01/18/2011 8:17:56 AM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: tuckrdout

That’s a pretty good analysis.


45 posted on 01/18/2011 8:26:03 AM PST by Poser (Cogito ergo Spam - I think, therefore I ham)
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To: The Comedian

You may be a “comedian” but I think you are correct. I see Sarah in the same role as MLK—the leader of the march, the organizer, the standard bearer. She motivates and inspires others to join the fight for freedom and liberty. She is the heart of the movement.

MLK would not have been as effective as a Senator or even President. I don’t think Palin will either.


46 posted on 01/18/2011 8:30:42 AM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: Poser

I thought so too. I think we need to remind the left that he said these things..


47 posted on 01/18/2011 4:14:27 PM PST by tuckrdout ( A fool vents all his feelings, but a wise man holds them back. Prov.29:11)
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To: tuckrdout


I've provided documented proof to you concerning the lack of faith on the part of MLK.

You've given me nothing but a lot of hope that the belief you have that he is a Christian is accurate and true. No facts, no documented proof to support your contention.

Furthermore, there are multiple articles/testimonies of those who have researched out MLK's life that will provide more substantiation of the fact that MLK was not a Christian.

1. He did not believe in the deity of Christ
2. He did not believe in the Crucifixion of Christ
3. He did not believe in the infalliability of the Bible.
4. He did not believe in the Virgin birth of Christ.


The man was heretic, he was not a Christian.

Was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A Christian?

I've provided you with two sites of information providing documentation concernin the lack of Christian faith on the part of MLK, without which, according to the Bible, we will not see God, we will not make Heaven.

Until you can provide me with documentation that shows he truly repented of his unbelief later in life, you are believing in fairy tales.

I know this, because if he had truly repented, he would have been shouting it from the roof-tops.

Do a google search. You won't find one instance of documented proof of MLK stating he was either born-again or Saved in the Christian sense.
48 posted on 01/18/2011 7:34:05 PM PST by SoConPubbie
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To: tuckrdout; Islander7; PetroniusMaximus
Here is more by MLK jr. On Communism:

Here is the truth concerning the Marxist nature of MLK, the part you either left out or apparently were not aware of:

"King, however, believed in government sway, calling capitalism a system "permitting necessities to be taken from the many to give luxuries to the few. " The "profit motive" has "encouraged smallhearted men to become cold and conscienceless."
49 posted on 01/18/2011 7:44:33 PM PST by SoConPubbie
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To: tuckrdout
Here is more by MLK jr. On Communism:

More on the Marxist nature of MLK:

"King claimed that the "good and just society is neither the thesis of capitalism nor the antithesis of communism, but a socially conscious democracy which reconciles the truths of individualism and collectivism."
50 posted on 01/18/2011 7:46:20 PM PST by SoConPubbie
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