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Japanese pilot who led Pearl Harbor WWII attack became US citizen
examiner.com ^ | 09/18/11 | Gil Guignat

Posted on 09/18/2011 1:22:21 PM PDT by SGW

This man [ Mitsuo Fuchida ] who led the first wave of airplane attacks on Pearl Harbor during the Second World War was honored with United States citizenship in 1966. His attack caused the deaths of 2500 Americans the morning of December 7, 1941.

“After World War II ended, Fuchida became an evangelist Christian preacher and frequently travelled to the United States to minister to the Japanese expatriate community. He became a United States citizen in 1966.”

(Excerpt) Read more at examiner.com ...


TOPICS: Government
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I still cannot believe that the US government honored this Japanese pilot who caused the deaths of 2500 Americans with US citizenship. It is no wonder our immigration policy is in shambles. Next thing you will know is that Obama will sign an executive order to give the family of the dead 9-11 terrorists retroactive social security benefits. You laugh but our immigration policy is so ridiculous now that this would not surprise me. Or maybe the family of the 9-11 terrorisat will sue the airlines for not having better security thus causing the deaths of the terrorists. We live in madness.
1 posted on 09/18/2011 1:22:29 PM PDT by SGW
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To: SGW

The past is the past. We have to move on. The USA was right in granting him citizenship. After all, he converted to Christianity.


2 posted on 09/18/2011 1:28:03 PM PDT by MinorityRepublican
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To: SGW

My grandfather must be rolling in his grave.


3 posted on 09/18/2011 1:28:17 PM PDT by dragonblustar (I'm reporting this to Attaaaaaaaaack Waaaaaatch! Vigilancia de Ataque!!!!!!!!!)
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To: SGW

At least US citizenship isn’t granted on the basis of racial purity as is with the Japanese.


4 posted on 09/18/2011 1:29:23 PM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: SGW

We elected a muslim after 9-11...our government has been infested with commies since the ‘20’s...what other result could one expect.


5 posted on 09/18/2011 1:29:26 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: SGW
Blame the military leaders who set Japan's foreign policy. Fuchida was a soldier & spent alot of time and energy reaching out to his old enemy after the war. By all accounts he was a decent man.

Besides, at least one of his kids moved to the states. I suspect this had something to do with his becoming a citizen.

But your are correct - our immigration policy today is totally insane.

6 posted on 09/18/2011 1:31:13 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: SGW

I don’t see what the big deal is. He was a legal naval combatant fighting for his country at the time. If you read the wiki article, it goes on to state how he came to reject the bushido code he believed in as a Japanese citizen, converted to Christianity and came to respect and believe in American values of the country he eventually adopted as his own...


7 posted on 09/18/2011 1:31:33 PM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: SGW

I agree that our immigration policy is messed up and we shouldn’t have let this guy in. But, not because he killed Americans in a war. He was a Soldier doing his job.


8 posted on 09/18/2011 1:32:14 PM PDT by Protoss
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To: SGW

Why so horrified? The man acted honorably by any standard. It was his government which decided to attack us, not him. He simply performed his duty to country, a value which is pretty universally respected, or used to be anyway. I’d be much more horrified to read about a coward or deserter becoming a US citizen.


9 posted on 09/18/2011 1:33:36 PM PDT by mr_griz
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To: SGW

You link to the examiner blog a lot, but it is really a crappy site full of flash and trackers. Do you have a better source for this story besides the examiner blog? If not, could you just post the entire blog instead of making folks go there and pick up malware?


10 posted on 09/18/2011 1:34:47 PM PDT by Larry Lucido (I can only be series in a parallel universe.)
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To: SGW
I heard this story the other day...must be going around. It did shock me.

I can see both sides...How could the U.S. govt do this? But, then if, by 1966, he had renounced the gvt that HE SERVED AS A MILITARY MAN....and, then becoming a Christian, becoming a pastor? It's an enormous amount to think about.

I must say...when I heard it...I thought: Uh-oh...Urban legend. But...what do I know? If it's true I'd love to read more about it...ALL ABOUT IT.

This sounds like an epic movie with a fantastic ending.

I'm still wondering about the urban legend thingy.

11 posted on 09/18/2011 1:35:36 PM PDT by Pigsley
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To: SGW

This is what happens when you make peace.


12 posted on 09/18/2011 1:35:59 PM PDT by Berlin_Freeper
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To: SGW

It is rough. I guess folks feel he repented?


13 posted on 09/18/2011 1:36:49 PM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: Protoss

Well I am stuck on the idea that he spearheaded the killing of 2500 Americans.

Why did we pursue German soldiers for war crimes? We should have forgiven them too after all they were doing their jobs.

Come to think of it, I don’t recall the Japanese showering the Americans who dropped the nuclear bombs in Japan with Japanese citizenship. They too were doing their jobs.

while we are at it, what is the big deal with building a Mosque at ground zero. Those wanting to build the mosque had nothing to do with 9-11.


14 posted on 09/18/2011 1:37:10 PM PDT by SGW
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To: SGW

Here - Much better than the examiner blog.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsuo_Fuchida

Mitsuo Fuchida 3 December 1902 – 30 May 1976) was a Japanese Captain[1] in the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service and a bomber pilot in the Imperial Japanese Navy before and during World War II. He is perhaps best known for leading the first air wave attacks on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. Fuchida was responsible for the coordination of the entire aerial attack working under the overall fleet commander Vice Admiral Nagumo.

After World War II ended, Fuchida became an evangelist Christian preacher and frequently travelled to the United States to minister to the Japanese expatriate community. He became a United States citizen in 1966.[2]


15 posted on 09/18/2011 1:37:40 PM PDT by Larry Lucido (I can only be series in a parallel universe.)
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To: SGW

I’m with you. God may forgive him, but I won’t.


16 posted on 09/18/2011 1:37:42 PM PDT by eater-of-toast ("It is much more important to kill bad bills than to pass good ones." --Calvin Coolidge)
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To: SGW

I read Fuchida’s story many years ago so this is not news to me. In an interview, he respected the United States and it’s soldiers and during war, you have to obey the commands of your superiors. Unlike in America, the hierarchy of Japanese culture is in the senpai’ or senior class that you HAVE to obey. I know...I co-translate Japanese animes for a fansub group.

He became a US citizen not only because of his children but he also believed that in America, Christianity is more accepted than it is in Japan where the prevalent religion is in the shinto’. I will give him a pass on this. I have an issue and real problem if he preached against the United States but he didn’t.


17 posted on 09/18/2011 1:39:26 PM PDT by max americana (FUBO NATION 2012 FK BARAK)
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To: SGW
I don't have a problem with this.
He did what a soldier does.
If he were alive today, would anyone here have a problem with giving Robert E. Lee back his citizenship?
He became citizen of a rebelling section of the country, that for all intents and purposes was another country. He made war on the country he had sworn to serve. He was the leading military figure in a conflict that costs the North (i.e. the USG!) 300000 lives (the South roughly the same!) Heck I would even give Jeff Davis his citizenship back if he was alive to accept it and wanted it.
I once met an American citizen who had been a U-boat captain. He was an engineer at a local plant where I grew up.
If this guy had been a commander of a POW camp, then I would ask a lot of questions & demand documentation before I would even consider. Remember Japanese POW camps had a higher mortality rate then German concentration camps.
18 posted on 09/18/2011 1:40:49 PM PDT by Reily
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To: SGW

Heard this story the other day...must be going around. It did shock me.

I can see both sides...How could the U.S. govt do this? But, then if, by 1966, he had renounced the gvtmt that HE SERVED AS A MILITARY MAN....and, then becoming a Christian, becoming a pastor? It’s an enormous amount to think about.

I must say...when I heard it...I thought: Hmmmm...Urban legend. But...what do I know? If it’s true I’d love to read more about it...ALL ABOUT IT.

This sounds like an epic movie with a fantastic ending.

I’m still wondering about the urban legend thingy


19 posted on 09/18/2011 1:42:35 PM PDT by Pigsley
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To: skeeter
Blame the military leaders who set Japan's foreign policy.

That's absolutely correct. Isoroku Yamamoto, who planned and let the Pearl Harbor attack, studied 3 years at Harvard and knew America well. He begged the Japanese High Command to leave us alone. He was overruled and ordered to attack, which he reluctantly did. He was not proud of attacking a "sleeping giant".

20 posted on 09/18/2011 1:42:57 PM PDT by Tonytitan
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To: Larry Lucido

I’m such a fool. I always go to these links without thinking. Now my computer is slow.


21 posted on 09/18/2011 1:44:26 PM PDT by Pigsley
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To: eater-of-toast

I guess my point is that no one should be rewarded with US citizenship when they killed Americans on that scale. This is ridiculous.

The message I get from this is that the more you crap all over America even by killing thousands of Americans the more we will reward you. I live in Arizona and let me tell you that out southern border is a blood bath with roughly 10,000 killed every year. Some illegals come over the border go on crime or killing sprees and then go back or are caught and sent back only to start again.

Now we have an immigration policy that seeks to give those killing Americans citizenship. There is such poor database enforcement that police have no idea who the bad guys are.

The point I got from this article is that whether it was 50 years ago where this Japanese guy helped kill 2500 Americans or now where narco terorrists regularly kill Americans, it seems that US citizenship does not stand for much these days.


22 posted on 09/18/2011 1:45:36 PM PDT by SGW
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To: SGW

The U.S allowed the Loyalists to come back to their homes.

We made former Confederates U.S. citizens again.

A former Nazi ran our space program.

The point is that wars end. Bitterness remains for sure, but you move on as best you can.

But I totally get how this will make some vets very upset.


23 posted on 09/18/2011 1:45:52 PM PDT by VanDeKoik (1 million in stimulus dollars paid for this tagline!)
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To: SGW

24 posted on 09/18/2011 1:46:29 PM PDT by Bobalu (More rubble, less trouble)
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To: SGW

After the war, Fuchida was called on to testify at the trials of some of the Japanese military for Japanese war crimes. This infuriated him as he believed this was little more than “victor’s justice”. Convinced that the Americans had treated the Japanese the same way and determined to bring that evidence to the next trial, in the spring of 1947, Fuchida went to Uraga Harbor near Yokosuka to meet a group of returning Japanese prisoners of war. He was surprised to find his former flight engineer, Kazuo Kanegasaki, who all had believed had died in the Battle of Midway. When questioned, Kanegasaki told Fuchida that they were not tortured or abused, much to Fuchida’s disappointment,,,, then went on to tell him of a young lady who served them with the deepest love and respect, but whose parents, missionaries, had been killed by Japanese soldiers on the island of Panay in the Philippines.

For Fuchida, this was inexplicable, as in the Bushido code revenge was not only permitted, it was a responsibility for an offended party to carry out revenge to restore honor. The murderer of one’s parents would be a sworn enemy for life. He became almost obsessed trying to understand why anyone would treat their enemies with love and forgiveness.

In the fall of 1948, Fuchida was passing by the bronze statue of Hachiko at the Shibuya Station when he was handed a pamphlet about the life of Jacob DeShazer, a member of the Doolittle Raid who was captured by the Japanese after his B-25 Mitchell ran out of fuel over occupied China. In the pamphlet “I Was a Prisoner of Japan” DeShazer, himself a former U.S. Army Air Force Staff Sergeant and bombardier, told his story of imprisonment, torture and his account of an “awakening to God”. It was from this experience that Fuchida reportedly decided to pursue a post-wartime role as a Christian missionary.
In 1951, he, along with a colleague, published an account of the Battle of Midway from the Japanese side. In 1952, Fuchida toured the United States as a member of the Worldwide Christian Missionary Army of Sky Pilots. Fuchida remained dedicated to a similar initiative as the group for the remainder of his life.

They guy wasn’t a terrorist murderer,, he was a Navy carrier pilot,, doing exactly what carrier pilots do. He came to embrace the Christian roots of American culture and to embrace it, and spread it. Give it a rest.


25 posted on 09/18/2011 1:48:35 PM PDT by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office)
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To: SGW

I’d rather have him as a citizen than ‘vato loco’.


26 posted on 09/18/2011 1:48:56 PM PDT by real saxophonist (The fact that you play tuba doesn't make you any less lethal. -USMC bandsman in Iraq)
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To: Bobalu

27 posted on 09/18/2011 1:50:32 PM PDT by Bobalu (More rubble, less trouble)
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To: VanDeKoik

Again, this guy spearheaded the killing of 2500 Americans. That is what I am stuck on. No one should be rewarded for that regardless of how sorry they are. This was not done by mistake. It was intentional.


28 posted on 09/18/2011 1:51:12 PM PDT by SGW
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To: SGW
“After World War II ended, Fuchida became an evangelist Christian preacher and frequently traveled to the United States to minister to the Japanese expatriate community. He became a United States citizen in 1966.”

It sounds as if he first served his county admirably during the war. He then spent his remaining years serving God in the most effective and humbling way possible. He was naturalized only 20 years after the war ended. Was there a protest then? It is pointless to dredge this up 45 years later as a flawed analogy to the problems with our current immigration system. Frankly, the U.S. might be far better off with more immigrants like Mr. Fuchida.

The following is an account of his post-war activities:


29 posted on 09/18/2011 1:51:12 PM PDT by Ronaldus Magnus
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To: SGW

In previous centuries of warring states - the defeated nation(s)’ territories would have been taken by the victors as the spoils of war. Every citizen of that defeated nation would have become a citizen of the occupier.

The US did not adopt the old Roman and European models - but if it had - the gentleman would have become a citizen by default - rather than application & in doing so, embracing the US Constitution and our Judeo-Christian traditions.


30 posted on 09/18/2011 1:52:12 PM PDT by sodpoodle (Despair: Man's surrender. Laughter: God's redemption.)
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To: SGW

At the substantial risk of sounding like a total dick, he was a uniformed enemy combatant, operation under (as far as he knew) lawful orders, executing a surgical strike against a military target.

He acquitted himself honorably after the war.


31 posted on 09/18/2011 1:52:41 PM PDT by null and void (Day 971 of America's holiday from reality...)
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To: SGW

Dresden is also thinking of making Bomber Harris a postumous citizen, lol!


32 posted on 09/18/2011 1:53:24 PM PDT by miss marmelstein (Run, Sarah, Run! Please!)
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To: SGW

Damn site is a resource hog.

I hit the print button to get out and read the article.


33 posted on 09/18/2011 1:54:53 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SGW
Why did we pursue German soldiers for war crimes? We should have forgiven them too after all they were doing their jobs.

Ordinary German soldiers were not pursued for war crimes. If you are referring to the ones who participated in the Nazi genocide, they were prosecuted for participating in deliberate acts of mass-murder against prisoners and innocent civilians, which is a whole different ball game from killing the other side's soldiers on the battlefield...

34 posted on 09/18/2011 1:55:58 PM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: SGW
Sounds to me like he was marked as OK by this fellow...I have no complaints.

35 posted on 09/18/2011 1:56:15 PM PDT by Bobalu (More rubble, less trouble)
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To: SGW

He was a soldier and acted honorably.
This is about what happened afterward...


36 posted on 09/18/2011 1:56:53 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (I want a Triple A president for our Triple A country)
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To: Larry Lucido

I thought is was just me.

I had to print the article and get out of that resource pig.


37 posted on 09/18/2011 1:57:32 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SGW

A Jap was flying for the Krauts?


38 posted on 09/18/2011 1:59:31 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
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To: SGW

“Why did we pursue German soldiers for war crimes”

We pursued the ones who came into towns,, rounded up innocent civilians, and murdered them. That was pure murder. Thats why we pursue them.

Furthermore, he had a deep postwar friendship with some Doolittle raiders. If guys like that can give it a rest, you should too.

Last,, by some accounts, after he came here, he found a way to give a million dollars a year to local governments on Oahu as an attempt to make restitution. I’ve never heard of such a thing. Did Werner Von Braun ever show such remorse, or do anything similar for the slave labor he used?


39 posted on 09/18/2011 2:00:22 PM PDT by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office)
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To: SGW

The United States was right to “grant” him citizenship.

He was a legal combatant, wasn’t tried in the Hague nor even a candidate for the Hague.

He converted to Christianity, became a preacher and by all accounts was an upright man.

I’m fine with him being an American.

The crux of the article is why do we have a broken immigration system that rewards the unjust and lawbreakers.


40 posted on 09/18/2011 2:00:41 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SGW

That’s very true.

However I’ve seen many cases where people at Pearl Harbor have let the past go and have become friends with some of the former adversaries that participated in the attack. it was a douche move on Japan’s part, but it was an official military engagement by an organized army of an recognized nation. Nothing like a 9-11 in those terms. It was respond in kind and the war happened to its conclusion.

I, as some guy in my early 30s, cant hold a grudge in the stead of the people back then. Japan was a completely reformed and friendly nation by the time I was born. Time had moved on. The war was over. This guy recognized he was in the wrong, and appears to have repented as much as humanly possible.

What else can you do at that point? If he was that repugnant to this nation, the U.S. military would have jailed or shot him when they had the chance after the war. They certainly knew what they were doing back then far better than we do.


41 posted on 09/18/2011 2:01:29 PM PDT by VanDeKoik (1 million in stimulus dollars paid for this tagline!)
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To: SGW

Bump for later read


42 posted on 09/18/2011 2:01:32 PM PDT by tanknetter
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This guy claimed to have led Pearl Harbor, as well as many other sneak attacks across the Pacific. Been at the Battle of Midway, one of the few Japanese pilots who escaped with his life. Been at Hiroshima & attend the Japanese surrender on the USS MO. Oh & he was a witness at the Japanese war crimes tribunals.

Either this guy is the Japanese Forest Gump, or he is an abject Liar.

If he was such a believer in the Bushido code then why wasn’t he one of the kamikaze pilots towards the end of the war? Why did he sit by & watch 15-16 year old boys with little to no flight time enter the cockpits on their suicide missions?

In my opinion this guy was a coward, fake & fraud. We don’t need trash like him dis-honoring our country.


43 posted on 09/18/2011 2:02:19 PM PDT by RC51
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To: SGW

He was not part of any group within his military that systematically carried out orders as part of death camps.

There is a difference.


44 posted on 09/18/2011 2:02:37 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SGW

Maybe in a few years they’ll grant posthumous US citizenship to Osama Bin Looser?


45 posted on 09/18/2011 2:04:01 PM PDT by SkyDancer (A critic is like a legless man who teaches running.)
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To: SGW

Also, Japan was subject to administration under the USJMC after the war.

If was important, we could have gone after Hirihito, Yamamoto and many others.

The outcome was just and we’ve moved on.


46 posted on 09/18/2011 2:04:35 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

During the Pearl Harbor attack hundreds of civilians were killed as well. Oh! Well collateral damage. No biggee. I can’t beleive how cavalier people are to simple brush aside this level of killing and explain it away.


47 posted on 09/18/2011 2:04:53 PM PDT by SGW
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To: DesertRhino
In 1951, he, along with a colleague, published an account of the Battle of Midway from the Japanese side.

I think there was a movie made based on that account. "I bombed Pearl Harbor"

What I find amazing, is that he survived the war!

48 posted on 09/18/2011 2:05:22 PM PDT by painter (No wonder democrats don't mind taxes.THEY DON'T PAY THEM !)
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To: Bobalu

Oh him again....


49 posted on 09/18/2011 2:08:25 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Revolting cat!

Can you believe it?

But we didn’t quit!


50 posted on 09/18/2011 2:09:14 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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