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Drugs Contamination In Tap Drinking Water
Health Alkaline Water ^ | January 17, 2014 | Alexanne Stone

Posted on 01/18/2014 8:00:18 AM PST by truthnomatterwhat

We have a tendency in our society to take our drinking water for granted and assume that water contamination will be taken care of by our local authorities. We need to change the way we think in this regard because budgets for water treatment are drying up and the use of recycled water is now becoming more common. We can no longer just think of water as a gift from Mother Nature that will always be there when we need it, but rather as an industry and commodity which needs investment!

Here is one way how the contamination in drinking water begins.

The drugs and personal care products that we use in our lives on a daily basis are excreted from our bodies or are washed off us during our daily cleansing rituals. And, we often dump them down the sink as we wash out their containers for recycle. We’ve not yet counted here the drugs in our drinking water that people intentionally flush down their toilets or dump down their sinks when they want to dispose of them.

So, all of this waste ends up as sewage which flows into sewer systems and septic tanks. But where does it go from there? Although the waste then goes through treatment plants, the current municipal water processing systems that are used in just about every town and city in America, are not set up to deal with the volume and types of environmental waste that we create inadvertently every day.

Many scientists see water management as a critical issue, and are beginning to monitor the impact that Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in water have on our health. PPCPs detected in drinking water are....

Drugs Contamination In Tap Drinking Water http://www.healthalkaline.com/drugs-contamination-in-tap-drinking-water/#ixzz2qlZap6tw Follow us: @healthalkaline on Twitter | alkalinewaterhealth on Facebook

(Excerpt) Read more at healthalkaline.com ...


TOPICS: Food; Health/Medicine; Society
KEYWORDS: drinkingwater; drugs; pharmaceuticals; tapwater

1 posted on 01/18/2014 8:00:18 AM PST by truthnomatterwhat
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To: truthnomatterwhat

That’s why I only drink rainwater and grain alcohol Mandrake.


2 posted on 01/18/2014 8:04:10 AM PST by Yorlik803 ( Church/Caboose in 2016)
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To: truthnomatterwhat

A few years ago I had a septic system pumped. I got to talking with the guy, and he commented that he’d been at some homes where the tanks were a real mess—things didn’t break down. He said they were usually occupied by elderly people taking a lot of medications, and that the medications seemed to kill the normally active bacteria, causing the problem.

I thought it was interesting, considering that medications are measured in fractions of grams, and the septic tank is roughly 1500 to 2000 gallons, plus overflow.


3 posted on 01/18/2014 8:04:47 AM PST by Pearls Before Swine
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To: Pearls Before Swine

Two professors at a local college found prescription drugs in the local river. Not all of a drug is metabolized by the body before it’s excreted.


4 posted on 01/18/2014 8:07:16 AM PST by meatloaf (Impeach Obama. That's my New Year's resolution.)
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To: truthnomatterwhat

Fifty years of birth control hormones in the water supply has given us a generation of sissified wusses instead of masculine men.


5 posted on 01/18/2014 8:09:01 AM PST by informavoracious (Open your eyes, people!)
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To: Pearls Before Swine

I have a rental income property with a septic tank, it’s amazing what people flush. They have no idea some measure of it ends up in the tap water.


6 posted on 01/18/2014 8:09:44 AM PST by truthnomatterwhat (Proclaim liberty!)
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To: Pearls Before Swine
I'd still rather have a septic tank, so I can control what's in there and be responsible for upkeep. It's bizarre that for recylcing, people wash out containers inside their houses and let that gunk into the system.

I never had sewer until I moved here. Upkeep of the lines is pricey. I NEVER had a problem with a septic system....I wish the law allowed that option.

Another huge source of contamination that gets into rivers and lakes is the chemicals that people put on their lawns. There isn't even a reason for that. A well-chosen grass for the environment and soil conditions does not need fertilizers or plant foods.

7 posted on 01/18/2014 8:14:29 AM PST by grania
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To: truthnomatterwhat

The thing I don’t understand about this cycle of drugs being washed off and then returning is this: Drugs don’t degrade?


8 posted on 01/18/2014 8:14:48 AM PST by TalBlack
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To: truthnomatterwhat

“They have no idea some measure of it ends up in the tap water.”

The septic holds solid waste that often decomposes with the residue having to be periodically pumped out. The water goes underground and is hopefully purified by mother nature in the septic field and then goes to ground water where the pump pulls it out of well and back into the house.


9 posted on 01/18/2014 8:16:26 AM PST by staytrue
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To: Yorlik803

10 posted on 01/18/2014 8:18:25 AM PST by EEGator
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To: TalBlack

Drugs are considered toxic waste and have to be discarded professionally. Google how to get rid of expired prescription drugs.


11 posted on 01/18/2014 8:21:46 AM PST by truthnomatterwhat (Proclaim liberty!)
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To: informavoracious

LOL :)


12 posted on 01/18/2014 8:22:14 AM PST by truthnomatterwhat (Proclaim liberty!)
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To: staytrue

Right! So what to do about that?


13 posted on 01/18/2014 8:24:37 AM PST by truthnomatterwhat (Proclaim liberty!)
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To: Pearls Before Swine
I thought it was interesting, considering that medications are measured in fractions of grams, and the septic tank is roughly 1500 to 2000 gallons, plus overflow.

When medicines are dosed, one of the factors considered is how much of the medicines the body can absorb before the rest is excreted as waste.

In a septic tank, the antibiotics aren't going anywhere and can pose as more than the required quantity to kill off the microbes, even in large containers.

14 posted on 01/18/2014 8:30:21 AM PST by James C. Bennett (An Australian.)
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To: Yorlik803

Yeah but tap water is now free anti-depressants and viagra for everyone!


15 posted on 01/18/2014 8:32:51 AM PST by DannyTN (A>)
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To: truthnomatterwhat
I've suddenly taken an interest in hydroponics after another interest, mining bitcoins, led me to find a use for the excess heat from the computer used. In learning about hydroponics, I've had to learn about water. Most water from a municipal source is way to chlorinated and alkaline for plants and added to this the TDS (total dissolved solids) was borderline for human consumption in the case of our water supply where I live.

For years, I have been using the expensive countertop filters and water pitcher filters to take out the chorine and other contaminants - I thought. After getting a TDS meter and testing our water before and after filtering, I discovered these filters do almost nothing in the way of filtering out contaminates. Our water system has a TDS reading of 450+ (even after filtering). The limit is 500. This means there are all kinds of other compounds and salts dissolved in the water that not only prevent it from hydrating a body properly, many can be harmful to you over time. If plants and their simple systems can't handle it, common sense says a complex system like the human body can also be adversely affected by these contaimenants.

In order to verify my readings, I tested some distilled water I had on hand that was years old. It tested zero for TDS. I also had some bottles of Ozarka Spring water stored. Ozarka had a reading of about 45 on the TDS meter. pH of the municipal water was practically off the scale of my test strips 8-9. Rainwater here is about 5. Plants like a pH of about 6. In my smug ignorance, and false faith in my "filtered" pitchers, I often berated those who drank bottled water - not anymore, at least not those who drink Ozarka spring water from Walmart.

It's also no wonder I have had a "brown thumb" for years. I had been killing plants with chlorinated, high alkaline water. The solution I've found, just recently I might add and because of researching hydroponics, was the purchase of a reverse osmosis system. It immediately lowered the TDS to 12 and the PH to a perfect 6 for plants. Coffee and food prepared using this water now tastes far superior to that made from water out of the municipal tap.

After more research, I find that most say the human body needs a higher pH (more alkaline) or neutral water (ph of 7). I'm not convinced but looking at adding a mineral post filter to the system split off from the main tank, just for a mineralized water for drinking.

Would appreciate input of others who have studied and worked on this.

16 posted on 01/18/2014 8:50:24 AM PST by Errant (Surround yourself with intelligent and industrious people who help and support each other.)
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To: truthnomatterwhat

Glad we have a well for our water here in the mountains, and it’s sparsely populated.


17 posted on 01/18/2014 8:53:50 AM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: Yorlik803
"That’s why I only drink rainwater and grain alcohol Mandrake."

The cure! That's what you got there is the cure.

(Nothing will get you back on your feet from a bad hangover faster than the cure!)

18 posted on 01/18/2014 9:03:51 AM PST by Slump Tester (What if I'm pregnant Teddy? Errr-ahh -Calm down Mary Jo, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it)
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To: truthnomatterwhat

Many years ago, I read a story about how Prozac was found in the water table in England.


19 posted on 01/18/2014 9:16:01 AM PST by RandallFlagg (IRS = Internal Revenge Service)
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To: James C. Bennett

In a septic tank, they flow out with the rest of the effluent into the drainage system. I would think an equilibrium concentration would eventually be reached.


20 posted on 01/18/2014 9:19:09 AM PST by Pearls Before Swine
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To: DannyTN

That is a joke there, but It will be deleted.


21 posted on 01/18/2014 9:25:15 AM PST by Yorlik803 ( Church/Caboose in 2016)
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To: grania
I never had sewer until I moved here. Upkeep of the lines is pricey.

What upkeep? Is your house real old?

22 posted on 01/18/2014 10:34:47 AM PST by ansel12 (Ben Bradlee -- JFK told me that "he was all for people's solving their problems by abortion".)
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To: RandallFlagg

” I read a story about how Prozac was found in the water table in England.”

The thing the story didn’t tell you is to get the equivalent of a daily prescribed dose of Prosac, you’d have to drink the equal of a olympic-sized swimming pool of water every day. We can now detect things in the most minute concentrations imaginable! Like .001 parts per trillion.
If your tap water sucks, call the epa. They love to hassle water companies! I know! I retired from operating on two weeks ago, after 30 years.


23 posted on 01/18/2014 11:01:23 AM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: ansel12

The upkeep expense is on the sewer lines. They all had to be replaced with new pipes to the street and the town building inspector has to approve of an (expensive) engineering plan. They can back up if the main lines get overwhelmed in storms. Every government that exists can pass upgrades that have to be paid for and create new standards that must be met. I never had problems with septic, as I was careful about what went down the drain.


24 posted on 01/18/2014 11:42:41 AM PST by grania
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To: grania

I’m a Plumbing contractor, is this your house you are talking about?

If a house lasts long enough then the line in the yard will have to be replaced, just as the line to the septic eventually gets replaced, but other than that, the septic is the one that requires routine maintenance, not a sewer line.

One installs a sewer line from the house to the property line when the house is built, and that should be it for 50 or 70 years.


25 posted on 01/18/2014 12:04:33 PM PST by ansel12 (Ben Bradlee -- JFK told me that "he was all for people's solving their problems by abortion".)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra
If your tap water sucks, call the epa.

Naaa. I just drink beer.
;-)
26 posted on 01/18/2014 12:29:25 PM PST by RandallFlagg (IRS = Internal Revenge Service)
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To: ansel12
The pipes lasted over 60 years. During the drought, tree roots ate the clay pipes. The house was originally built for septic, so when the pipes were replaced it was tricky to find the best "path" to the street line, which is a longer distance than septic would be. The original sewer work wasn't all that efficient. I'm up to code now, and the plumbing service stands by their work.

Since I always, since childhood, had septic, I am very careful about what goes in the system. So for me, it (and being stuck with town water) seems like punishmet for other people's careless use.

27 posted on 01/18/2014 12:29:28 PM PST by grania
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To: grania

If professionals replaced the sewer line in your yard, then you should be good for 75 years or so, with no further service needed.

I’ll take sewer over septic any day, septic is a problem that needs maintenance and attention and is a nightmare to replace.


28 posted on 01/18/2014 12:57:33 PM PST by ansel12 (Ben Bradlee -- JFK told me that "he was all for people's solving their problems by abortion".)
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