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Overview of the ten major Linux distributions
Linux Forums ^ | 2006-04-01 | Clement Lefebvre

Posted on 04/04/2006 9:16:35 AM PDT by N3WBI3

A review of the 10 major Linux distributions out there, giving the pros and cons of each and every one of them Introduction

The Microsoft Windows operating system is developed and released by a single company. It comes with a minimal set of applications (a calculator, a few games, some networking tools, an Internet browser.. etc). Other software can be obtained by users from various sources and installed on the operating system.

GNU/Linux is different. A GNU/Linux operating system is made of a Linux kernel, a set of GNU tools, an installation program, a package management system and a lot of other software components. Because all these components are free to use and to distribute, anybody can assemble and configure them according to their needs and create their very own GNU/Linux operating system. Since 1993, a lot of people and companies have been distributing Linux operating systems. These distributions made it easy for people to get and to install a working GNU/Linux system on their personal computer.

At first only a few distributions were available. Nowadays there are so many, that it would be pointless to compare all of them. The website http://www.distrowatch.com lists more than 350 active distributions and reports new releases almost every day. Of course, some distributions are quite similar, although some others are very different to each others. Depending on your needs you'll prefer some more than others.

All distributions include the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds and the GNU tools developed by Richard Stallman but they don't necessarily use their latest versions. Some distributions even make their own changes to the kernel. Distributions usually differ in the choice of software applications they offer, in the way these software applications are configured and in the way they are installed and upgraded. Distributions also differ in many aspects such as their philosophy towards proprietary software, their priorities between ease of use and efficiency or between stability and latest technology. In fact, every distribution is different and this means you have more than 350 ways to run GNU/Linux!

Of course some distributions are more popular than others. This article is dedicated to the 10 most famous and popular: Debian, Slackware, Fedora, Mandriva, Suse, Ubuntu, Knoppix, Gentoo, Mepis and Xandros. Debian

Debian is one of the oldest GNU/Linux distributions. It was created in 1993 by Ian Murdock who named it after the combination of his own name and the one of his then-girlfriend (now wife) Debra. The Debian project is non-commercial and gathers more than a thousand developers throughout the world. A strict organization and clear guidelines made its releases famous for their stability and reliability. The project is very ambitious and supports more than 15,000 packages on 11 architectures: m68k, SPARC, Alpha, PowerPC, x86, IA-64, PA-RISC, MIPS (big and little endian), ARM and S/390. AMD64 is also supported although it is not officially included in the distribution. Debian is known for its strong adherence to the Unix and free software philosophies, its stability and its huge community. It is also very well documented and translated in many languages. Its software package management is extremely powerful and was adopted by many other distributions. Although it is meant to be a general-purpose distribution, the quality of its releases made Debian a distribution of choice for servers.

Debian provides three branches: "Stable" which corresponds to the latest release, "Unstable", which is in perpetual evolution and "Testing" which represents the next release to-be. Although it is possible to use "Testing" and to stay up to date, a lot of people are unhappy with the slow release cycle, which makes the "Stable" branch quickly outdated. For this reason Debian is seen as a serious and stable distribution but not as a cutting-edge and reactive one. This "outdated" reputation combined with the absence of graphical installation or configuration tools made Debian look hard to use and slow to evolve. When it comes to desktop, a lot of people prefer fast release cycle, eye-candy configuration tools, graphical installers and ease of use.. and this is not what Debian is.

Official website: http://www.debian.org

Pros: Open-Source philosophy, non-commercial project, strong community, huge selection of packages and supported architectures, one of the best package management, excellent documentation, extremely stable and well-tested releases, modular, fast.

Cons: Slow release cycle, text-based installer, lack of configuration tools Slackware

Founded in 1992 by Patrick Volkerding, Slackware is the oldest surviving GNU/Linux distribution. It is very secure, stable and it is often recommended for server installations. The package management is minimal and doesn't deal with dependencies, the installer and configuration tools are text-based and almost everything is done through configuration files. Slackware doesn't offer graphical frontends nor eye-candy configuration tools. When Patrick was asked why Slackware releases do not have code names, he simply replied that there was no need. In fact the distribution focuses on stability and is well known for being bug-free. System administrators usually say that Slackware is the most Unix-Like GNU/Linux distribution. Most packages are used in their pristine form without any Slackware made improvements. Slackware is usually not recommended to novice users although it is easy to configure and probably one of the most formative distributions. What a user learns while configuring Slackware usually applies to any distribution. Rather than using distribution-specific configuration tools, the user has to modify settings in configuration files and so he has to learn about Linux internals which are common to all distributions. For these reason the Slackware distribution is usually used by system administrators, eager to learn novice users or simply Slackware fans :)

Official website: http://www.slackware.com

Pros: Stability, security, strong adherence to Unix principles, speed and performance.

Cons: Minimal package management, infrequent releases, limited hardware detection. Fedora

One of the best known Linux company in the world is Red Hat, founded in 1995 by Bob Young and Marc Ewing. In 2003, Red Hat decided to focus on business and stopped releasing its public distribution. The company chose to sponsor a community driven project called Fedora. Red Hat Linux 9 was the last version in the Red Hat product line and was replaced by Fedora Core. This distribution is quite unique and mixes leading edge features and conservatism. The result is a stable and secure system with frequent releases and up to date packages which suits both server and desktop installations. The package management is based on RPM, invented by Red Hat, and it is enhanced by a set of tools like Yum, which bring additional features similar to the Debian package management. Because of its close relationship with Red Hat this distribution is very popular among companies. Efforts were also made to make it attractive to the public and Fedora is full of graphical configuration and administration tools. The installation is also graphical and special attention was put to the look and feel of the distribution. As a result Fedora is a popular choice for both desktop and servers among Linux users.

Official website: http://fedora.redhat.com

Pros: Widely used, good support, innovation, good-looking desktop, configuration tools.

Cons: Not as stable as Debian or Slackware for server use, not as easy and up to date as Suse or Mandrake for desktop use. Fedora is truly a general-purpose distribution. Mandriva

Originally called Mandrake and created by Gael Duval in 1998, Mandriva is based on Red Hat. It uses a RPM-based package management, which is enhanced with a tool called urpmi. Mandriva became famous and popular since its first release thanks to an efficient and powerful graphical installer, which is still considered the best nowadays. The default Gnome desktop environment used in Red Hat was replaced in favor of KDE and some good looking configuration tools were added. Also, Mandriva tends to include new versions of software applications as soon as possible and to stay up to date as much as possible, relying on the users to report bugs a posteriori. As a result, Mandriva is highly up-to-date and even though some of its releases are buggy it remains the best distribution for people who are new to Linux or people who find it acceptable to experience some crashes if this means benefiting from the latest versions of applications.

Official website: http://www.mandriva.com

Pros: Highly up-to-date, easy to use, good looking desktop, good community support.

Cons: Unstable, releases are initially reserved to mandrivaClub members and then made public after several weeks. Suse

Since its creation, Suse has always been seen as a distribution of choice for desktop installations. It benefits from a powerful installer and configuration tool called YaST. Professional attention is made to detail, the default KDE desktop environment, the boot process, everything is tailored to make Suse pleasant to the eyes and a serious choice for professional desktops. In 2003, Novell acquired the company and made ISOs of Suse releases freely available on the Internet. Novell also opened the development to public participation and released YaST under the General Public License. Since the launch of OpenSuse, the distribution is now completely free. Suse is stable, polished and pleasant to use. It is probably one of the best desktop solutions.

Official website: http://www.suse.com , http://www.opensuse.org

Pros: Up-to-date, easy to use, good looking, stable.

Cons: Speed and performance. Ubuntu

In 2004 a distribution which was never heard of before, quickly became the most popular and famous of all distributions: Ubuntu. Based on the "Unstable" branch of Debian, Ubuntu features a fast release cycle, up to date and numerous packages, fast download mirrors, great documentation and even free shipment of CDs. Even though the installer is text-based and the configuration tools are not as good looking or integrated as those found in Fedora, Suse or Mandriva, this distribution quickly became the most used for desktop use. Ubuntu was created by Mark Shuttleworth and is distributed by his company Canonical Ltd. It is not clear whether or not Ubuntu is profitable to Canonical Ltd, but according to the multi-millionaire Mark Shuttleworth, this is not the main priority nor purpose of the distribution. Instead, Ubuntu aims to be an innovative and dynamic general purpose distribution which tackles issues that were not addressed by other distributions. Since its creation, Ubuntu has been the most popular GNU/Linux distribution and every single release is better than the previous one.

Official website: http://www.ubuntu.com

Pros: Great community of users and developers, great documentation, up to date packages, fast release cycle.

Cons: The business model doesn't seem to be viable. Knoppix

Created in 2003 by Klaus Knopper, Knoppix is a live-CD distribution, which means the user can run it directly from the CD without having to install it on the hard drive. Thanks to an efficient compression mechanism, the Knoppix CD features a huge selection of software. Knoppix also provides a great automatic hardware detection, which is far better than those of other distributions. The CD can be used as a recovery or administration tool, as a Linux demonstration, as a hardware test tool or even as a full GNU/Linux desktop distribution since it is possible to install it on the hard drive once booted from the CD. Releases are frequent and packages, based on Debian's "Unstable" branch are quite up-to-date.

Official website: http://www.knoppix.com

Pros: Live-CD, excellent hardware detection, good and up to date package selection.

Cons: Slow if run from the CD. Gentoo

Created in 2002 by Daniel Robbins, Gentoo comes from the idea of adding the FreeBSD autobuild feature, "ports" into GNU/Linux. Gentoo is a source-distribution, which means that its packages are not binary but source packages. Each package is meant to be compiled on the user's computer in order to get the best performance and speed out of the resulting compiled binary software. Because repositories use source-packages, they are also very quick to get new software releases as soon as they come out. This results in a very fast and highly up-to-date distribution. The package management is also very efficient and easy to use. On the other hand, the installation of the system and of big packages can be very long and tedious, even with a fast processor.

Official website: http://www.gentoo.org

Pros: Highly up-to-date, very fast, good documentation.

Cons: Long and tedious installation, can be unstable. Mepis

Created in 2003 by Warren Woodford, Mepis is a mix between Debian "Unstable" and Knoppix. It is a live-CD which, once booted, features a graphical installation program. Users can simply boot on the CD, try the distribution, and if they like it.. run the graphical installation program. Also, the distribution chose a different path regarding the use of proprietary software, arguing that the user's comfort was more important than the adherence to open-source philosophy. By default, Mepis includes NVIDIA drivers, Flash and Java plugins, Java runtime, multimedia codecs, and other non-free software. The hardware automatic detection is very good and even detects some winmodems. In-house configuration utilities are also provided.

Official website: http://www.mepis.com

Pros: Installable Live-CD, pre-configured with latest plugins and codecs.

Cons: Not yet well-established, poor adherence to open-source principles. Xandros

In 2001 Xandros acquired Corel Linux. The distribution was based on Debian and aimed at making it easy for novice users to use GNU/Linux. Nowadays Xandros Desktop is the most user-friendly distribution on the market and is recommended to first time Linux users. In its Deluxe edition Xandros Desktop also includes a NTFS resizing tool and a Windows compatibility layer called CrossOver, which makes it possible to run some Windows applications.

Official website: http://www.xandros.com

Pros: Designed for beginners, easy to use, very stable.

Cons: Small package selection, includes proprietary components, only free for personal use. Conclusion

People often ask "so which distribution is right for me?". The answer is very simple: "It depends!". It depends on your needs, it depends on your experience, on your philosophy or your tastes. It depends on a lot of things, and even if you found the one you preferred among these 10 majors distributions, don't forget that there are about 340 other distributions available, which could potentially suit your needs. If you're ready for the adventure, go and explore. Read reviews, try as many as you can and make your own mind. Otherwise, if you just need something good without the hassle, stick to these 10 major distributions. If you're running a server, consider Debian or Slackware. If you want to install Linux on your home computer for desktop use, consider them all. If you're new to Linux you could try Xandros, Mepis, Suse or Mandriva. Different people have different tastes and this is exactly why GNU/Linux comes in so many flavors...


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: distributions; linux; opensource
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1 posted on 04/04/2006 9:16:38 AM PDT by N3WBI3
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To: N3WBI3; ShadowAce; Tribune7; frogjerk; Salo; LTCJ; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; amigatec; Fractal Trader; ..

OSS PING

If you are interested in the OSS ping list please mail me

2 posted on 04/04/2006 9:18:50 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (If SCO wants to go fishing they should buy a permit and find a lake like the rest of us..)
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To: N3WBI3
Unless you just enjoy playng with Linux, OS/X is well worth the extra hardware cost. ;)
3 posted on 04/04/2006 9:19:24 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ("When the government is invasive, the people are wanting." -- Tao Te Ching)
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To: N3WBI3

IBGE!


4 posted on 04/04/2006 9:19:55 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: ShadowAce
IBGE!

Ha Ha!

5 posted on 04/04/2006 9:25:55 AM PDT by frogjerk (LIBERALISM: The perpetual insulting of common sense.)
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To: N3WBI3


6 posted on 04/04/2006 9:28:07 AM PDT by xcamel (Press to Test, Release to Detonate)
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To: N3WBI3

if you are a beginner i would suggest Mepis, i haven't tried Xandros so I cant comment on that one, but Mepis seems pretty nice.


7 posted on 04/04/2006 9:54:25 AM PDT by Echo Talon
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To: xcamel

So, if you're an 'xcamel', what are you now? ;-)


8 posted on 04/04/2006 10:03:44 AM PDT by zeugma (Anybody who says XP is more secure than OS X or Linux has been licking toads.)
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To: All
Newbies might want to check out this month's Tux Magazine. It's downloadable for free.

 Here's the blurb about the current issue from their page:

In Issue 12, available April 1, 2006, TUX features its first Linux distribution review and comparison. We feature seven reviews of some of the most popular Linux distributions. As explained in our review introduction, we wanted to capture these reviews from the freshest "out-of-the-box" perspective possible. For me, this was important because once you've used Linux as a desktop for a few years, you tend to forget what it feels like to be new to Linux--especially if the new user happens to be an ordinary user and not an engineer.


9 posted on 04/04/2006 10:06:47 AM PDT by zeugma (Anybody who says XP is more secure than OS X or Linux has been licking toads.)
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To: N3WBI3

Subscription fees or not I dont know how the author left out RHEL, and *shudder* Linspire..


10 posted on 04/04/2006 10:07:58 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (If SCO wants to go fishing they should buy a permit and find a lake like the rest of us..)
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To: xcamel

11 posted on 04/04/2006 10:34:52 AM PDT by cloud8
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To: N3WBI3

bump


12 posted on 04/04/2006 10:46:14 AM PDT by Tribune7
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To: N3WBI3

I've run various distros (Red Hat, Debian, Ubuntu, Knoppix-install) but the one I use now is Gentoo. The docs are excellent and once the initial system is set-up, the snappy performance is great. I still have debian installed on a different partition, but hardly ever boot into it anymore.

But I fiddled a lot with Linux before I tried Gentoo, so YMMV. My brother (who is a Linux newbie) runs Ubuntu on one of his old ,'dead' machines. Seems to work out well for him, esp. with his C programming class.


13 posted on 04/04/2006 10:47:15 AM PDT by Betis70 (zoom zoom)
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To: N3WBI3

mentioning ms at the beginning of an article about linux seems sacrilegious


14 posted on 04/04/2006 10:48:38 AM PDT by madtier1
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To: N3WBI3
Thanks n3wbi3, this is something I've been looking for.  Very informative!
15 posted on 04/04/2006 11:12:29 AM PDT by softwarecreator (Facts are to liberals as holy water is to vampires.)
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To: N3WBI3

bttt


16 posted on 04/04/2006 11:15:40 AM PDT by dennisw (If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles-Sun Tzu)
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To: Echo Talon

Xandros is an excellent beginner distro, there is a free version.,..


17 posted on 04/04/2006 11:20:05 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (History is soon Forgotten,)
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To: Betis70

I'm impressed by Vector Linux, fast browsing performance with Firebird.


18 posted on 04/04/2006 11:22:14 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (History is soon Forgotten,)
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To: N3WBI3; Golden Eagle

 


19 posted on 04/04/2006 11:29:24 AM PDT by Incorrigible (If I lead, follow me; If I pause, push me; If I retreat, kill me.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Interesting, I'll have to take a look at it. I do a lot of software tinkering on my home machine, so I still need a full distro (well, with Apt or Emerge anyway), but since the debian partition isn't really serving any real use, maybe I'll try Vector Linux there.


20 posted on 04/04/2006 11:33:30 AM PDT by Betis70 (zoom zoom)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Xandros is an excellent beginner distro, there is a free version.,..

Whats better that or mepis?

21 posted on 04/04/2006 11:35:38 AM PDT by Echo Talon
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To: Incorrigible
It's interesting that you would use a Mac site instead of a Windows site....

:)

22 posted on 04/04/2006 11:39:17 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: Incorrigible

lol


23 posted on 04/04/2006 11:43:12 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (If SCO wants to go fishing they should buy a permit and find a lake like the rest of us..)
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To: N3WBI3

Linspire's no good?


24 posted on 04/04/2006 12:05:45 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: N3WBI3
All distributions include the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds and the GNU tools developed by Richard Stallman

Isn't there a Linux distro that doesn't use the GNU tools? I seem to remember one.

25 posted on 04/04/2006 1:04:33 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: N3WBI3

The *nix world further fragments, as all the Unix profits slowly leave the building.


26 posted on 04/04/2006 1:22:05 PM PDT by Golden Eagle
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To: N3WBI3
There's not a more apropos tech thread for this today, and since EWeek won't let you post articles, I figured I'd just drop it here...

 Microsoft Says Recovery from Malware Becoming Impossible

In a rare discussion on the severity of the Windows malware scourge, a Microsoft security official said businesses should consider investing in an automated process to wipe hard drives and reinstall operating systems as a practical way to recover from malware infestation.

http://www.eweek.com/print_article2/0,1217,a=174915,00.asp

Yup. Reinstall, Reboot. It's the Microsoft Way. 

27 posted on 04/04/2006 1:22:22 PM PDT by zeugma (Anybody who says XP is more secure than OS X or Linux has been licking toads.)
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To: antiRepublicrat; N3WBI3
All distributions include the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds and the GNU tools developed by Richard Stallman

Torvalds? Isn't his dad a big time communist? And Stallman? Leftist whacko, right?

28 posted on 04/04/2006 1:25:20 PM PDT by Golden Eagle
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To: zeugma

Are you saying these systems weren't rebuilt, or shouldn't have been rebuilt?

http://www.crn.com/sections/breakingnews/breakingnews.jhtml;jsessionid=XYEX2JU3QTZAKQSNDBNSKH0CJUMEKJVN?articleId=18830621&_requestid=982415

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2003/1124debian.html

http://news.com.com/2100-7349-5113227.html


29 posted on 04/04/2006 1:29:14 PM PDT by Golden Eagle
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To: Golden Eagle; Bush2000
Torvalds? Isn't his dad a big time communist?

Yep, and historically a major source of embarrassment for Linus and friction between him and his father. Sorry, your guilt-by-association tactic fails as usual.

And Stallman? Leftist whacko, right?

We've already been over that. We agree on that point. Others you mischaracterize as being Stallman followers also have stated their agreement on this point, even being more vicious in their description of him.

So you can stop it already. It doesn't work. It only pushes you further into the loon category.

I wish Bush2000 was back. We disagreed a lot, but at least he was intelligent, and his trolling a fun game at times. You're just a bore.

30 posted on 04/04/2006 1:33:13 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: N3WBI3

Useful article. Thanks for posting.


31 posted on 04/04/2006 1:34:14 PM PDT by Poser (Willing to fight for oil)
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To: martin_fierro

Its an ok distro but I think it sacrifices some of the workstation power behind Linux to make it act like windows..


32 posted on 04/04/2006 1:56:22 PM PDT by N3WBI3 (If SCO wants to go fishing they should buy a permit and find a lake like the rest of us..)
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To: Golden Eagle

Score (2) "We get it you dont Like Open Source Software"


33 posted on 04/04/2006 1:57:44 PM PDT by N3WBI3 (If SCO wants to go fishing they should buy a permit and find a lake like the rest of us..)
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To: N3WBI3

OIC


34 posted on 04/04/2006 2:02:30 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: martin_fierro

"Linspire's no good?"

It's worth every penny you pay for it.

I like Gnome Mahjong. It rocks.


35 posted on 04/04/2006 2:05:26 PM PDT by Poser (Willing to fight for oil)
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To: Golden Eagle
I'm sorry, Zeugma has stepped out for a bit. You'll have to be satisfied with my automatic troll responder.

You Are Irrelevant.

 

 

36 posted on 04/04/2006 2:30:22 PM PDT by zeugma (Anybody who says XP is more secure than OS X or Linux has been licking toads.)
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To: zeugma
You'd like me to be irrelevant since I blow holes in your BS constantly. If those linux systems weren't rebuilt after they were compromised, you boys have been making a big mistake downloading from them ever since. That's like "windows update" getting cracked, can you imagine the uproar from you if something like that happened to Microsoft? It would be non stop.
37 posted on 04/04/2006 2:55:26 PM PDT by Golden Eagle
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To: everyone
All good points. The article is a very good reference for people considering the switch.

Having made the jump to Linux (virtually alone) a little over a year ago, there's more than a few pearls of wisdom that I've learned here and along the way and would like to add.

So while this might be a vanity post, I believe there's a couple of pieces of "food for thought" that people considering Linux should take into account.

Call me a little biased, but I personally recommend Suse to new Linux users. However, Fedora and Mandriva are also very good choices.

Of course, it depends a lot on what you plan to use Linux for and the experience you have with *nix systems. For example, it's not very likely a person who's always run Windows to install and run Gentoo, BSD, or Slackware.

Many people want to keep a dual-boot running--for whatever reason. I've personally found that using a distro with a graphical installer makes it easier to resize an existing (most often, Windows) partition and enable both OSs to boot correctly.

Another thing is to keep in mind other users. Example: if you're the only one who's comfortable with *nix, it's not always the wisest option to run a more advanced distro. Many people simply require a smooth transition as opposed to a steep jump (think the old phrase "baptism by fire").

38 posted on 04/04/2006 3:38:45 PM PDT by rzeznikj at stout (This Space For Rent. Call 555-1212 for more info.)
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To: Echo Talon

I know very little about Mempis.


39 posted on 04/04/2006 3:57:35 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (History is soon Forgotten,)
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To: Betis70

There is a Live CD version of Vector Linux just out.

Not sure how to install it to a HDD though.


40 posted on 04/04/2006 4:03:36 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (History is soon Forgotten,)
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To: Golden Eagle
Madam,

You are so full of crap that I couldn't care less what a raving lunatic like you has to say.

Again, you are irrevelant. 

Don't you folks hate trolls? 

41 posted on 04/04/2006 4:29:38 PM PDT by zeugma (Anybody who says XP is more secure than OS X or Linux has been licking toads.)
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To: N3WBI3

Bump for later reading (and thanks for the post)!


42 posted on 04/04/2006 4:38:49 PM PDT by LibertarianInExile (Freedom isn't free--no, there's a hefty f'in fee--and if you don't throw in your buck-o-5, who will?)
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To: N3WBI3

Mandriva use here.

It just gets better and better all the time.


43 posted on 04/04/2006 5:36:00 PM PDT by amigatec (There are no significant bugs in our software... Maybe you're not using it properly.- Bill Gates)
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To: Golden Eagle
If those linux systems weren't rebuilt after they were compromised, you boys have been making a big mistake downloading from them ever since.

As usual, you're showing where you have no idea what you're talking about or just can't read. As I promised, I won't call you ignorant, since you purposely avoid knowledge. It's too kind of a word for you.

The compromised FSF computer was replaced and files posted to the new server after verification (good security practice, keeping hashes of your files). The Debian and Gentoo systems were running file integrity checkers, which pinpoint exactly what was modified by the attacker at the file level (no archaic registry to mess with and search through), making cleanup easy and sure.

44 posted on 04/05/2006 7:12:49 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat
The compromised FSF computer was replaced

Sure was, so of course I was correct all along.

45 posted on 04/05/2006 7:26:24 AM PDT by Golden Eagle
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To: Golden Eagle
Sure was, so of course I was correct all along.

Correct in what? And the machines with integrity checkers?

You know nothing of Linux, only your little Windows world. You think that because things are hard on Windows, they must be hard on Linux. Sorry, a Linux system is not as hard to clean. There's no massive registry where multiple rootkits can hide themselves.

46 posted on 04/05/2006 7:45:26 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: rzeznikj at stout
SuSE is a fantastic distro - been using it for several years and I actually like what Novell is doing with it. I also run Gentoo, FedCore4, & Unbuntu. Tried Linspire and Xandros - both seem basic and Xandros will make an XP user feel at home with the UI.

I personally don't like dual-boot b/c I tend to stay with one O/S. I prefer virtual machines and now that Xen is packaged with SuSE it should work out fine.

Congratulations on the switch and thanks for the feedback - it's always helpful to hear what others are doing.

47 posted on 04/05/2006 7:52:14 AM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: antiRepublicrat

Those Linux systems were rebuilt just as they should have been. Anyone claiming they weren't is simply attempting more "linux lies" to cover up the original ones.


48 posted on 04/05/2006 8:14:25 AM PDT by Golden Eagle
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To: Golden Eagle
Those Linux systems were rebuilt just as they should have been.

One (FSF) was replaced, I suspect so there was no down time during a repair. The others were cleaned and put back online.

As far as the system is concerned, if you have a file integrity checker, you know EXACTLY what the rootkit modified. You then replace the affected files, run a couple standard utilities to make sure you got everything, and put the system online again. There's no need to rebuild. It's usually not quite so easy with Windows, with that joke of a registry.

49 posted on 04/05/2006 8:33:35 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Golden Eagle

"Anyone claiming they weren't is simply attempting more "linux lies" to cover up the original ones."

Wait...I thought the lie you were trying to expose was when Zeugma supposedly said that Linux never needed re-installing?

I'm still looking for that, BTW, since you never link to anything specific.


50 posted on 04/05/2006 9:07:51 AM PDT by FLAMING DEATH
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