Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Apartment Living With Your Dog
MSN Dog Central ^ | September 29, 2006 | Sandy Robins

Posted on 09/29/2006 7:10:16 AM PDT by libstripper

One sure sign that a downtown neighborhood is becoming a fashionable place to live—more than just a commercial district—is the number of dogs out and about on the sidewalks. Today, many apartment buildings and individual landlords are developing increasingly lenient pet policies to attract more dog owners to these newly gentrified urban areas.

There’s no question that city living offers many on-tap conveniences that make it an attractive alternative to a suburban lifestyle. But how dog friendly is downtown? There is much more to consider when it comes to your pal’s well-being than the landlord’s consent or the homeowner policy confirming that pets are welcome.

advertisementSeeking Out Pet Friendly Buildings Whether you are looking to rent or buy, the best way to find out if the neighborhood is dog friendly is to take your dog for a walk and stop to talk to anyone else out walking their dog.

Many realtors are now paying special attention to the pet-loving sector of the apartment housing market. So it’s a good idea to seek out someone who specializes in such properties. Veterinarian offices, groomers and pet stores are also a mine of information and many have notice boards with postings of suitable apartments in the area.

(Excerpt) Read more at dogcentral.msn.com ...


TOPICS: Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: apartments; doggieping; dogs; living
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101 next last
To: libstripper

Some big and giant breeds are actually perfect for apartments - mastiffs, greyhounds, deerhounds, etc. These breeds aren't very active after the age of 2 or 3 or so.

Other dogs that would appear to be a better fit, like Shelties, are hopeless because of their activity level and barking.


51 posted on 09/29/2006 10:42:45 AM PDT by Gingersnap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the OlLine Rebel

"Now, if the norm was well-behaved animals, it would be a different story."
____________________________

It's nice to see someone "gets it".

If the pet owner can't commit to the time to care for and train their pet they shouldn't get one.


52 posted on 09/29/2006 11:29:36 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

I would add, raise & train them PROPERLY. Not at PetSmart (PetStupid).


53 posted on 09/29/2006 11:30:38 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 52 | View Replies]

To: j. earl carter

Oopps...I forgot some people in get upset when people are nice to animals. Must of stuck in your craw, huh?


54 posted on 09/29/2006 11:30:49 AM PDT by Fawn (http://www.jokaroo.com/funnyvideos/toilet_obsession.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Eaker

"What are you doing this weekend, evicting a mother and her three children because their goldfish is too noisy?"
____________________________

You obviously don't read well. I think the reasoning is straight forward.


55 posted on 09/29/2006 11:32:19 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys

"Do you keep out children too? They can be noisy and pee on the floor too. Let's lump them in that category as well."
__________________________________

Your dog is an animal. It is not a human being. It's really silly to compare the two.


56 posted on 09/29/2006 11:34:12 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 50 | View Replies]

To: the OlLine Rebel
"I would add, raise & train them PROPERLY. Not at PetSmart (PetStupid)."
________________________________

You're absolutely right.
57 posted on 09/29/2006 11:48:02 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 53 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

I don't think it is silly at all. You obviously don't have pets.


58 posted on 09/29/2006 11:53:10 AM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 56 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys
"I don't think it is silly at all. You obviously don't have pets."
_____________________________

I knew at some point your irrationality would get the better of you. You are comparing a dog to a human being. The easiest way to point out the absurdity of what your saying is to ask how many of you pet owners, who think their pet is the same as a human being, are ready to die for your pet?

I know if it came to it I would give up my life for my child's life in a second. A pet is just a domesticated animal. It is not a human being. Pets are great to have in the right situation but they are not human beings.
59 posted on 09/29/2006 12:00:45 PM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 58 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

My animals are more well behaved than most of the children I come across on a daily basis. It is the owners and parents that make the difference. You are blackballing all renters based on your bias of pet owners. That is so narrow minded.


60 posted on 09/29/2006 12:32:52 PM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

My animals are more well behaved than most of the children I come across on a daily basis. It is the owners and parents that make the difference. You are blackballing all renters based on your bias of pet owners. That is so narrow minded.


61 posted on 09/29/2006 12:33:03 PM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys; wmfights

Hey folks, I can see it both ways. It's a pain in some places to find pet-friendly housing, and it's frustrating to try to talk to someone who doesn't see your pet the way you do. My dog is extremely well-behaved: potty-trained like a champ, doesn't scratch doors or try to dig through carpet, doesn't eat vinyl flooring or chew on door jambs. But a pet can put A LOT of extra wear-and-tear on a house. I lived in my last rental for 4 years, and that carpet was OBLITERATED. The landlord was going to replace it before we moved in, but I told him to leave it (it looked halfway decent, but definitely old). Four years later, it looked like we had played polo on it.


62 posted on 09/29/2006 1:00:36 PM PDT by AirForceBrat23
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: Harry Pothead
My two, a Weimador and a Daneador, are the same. They like to sleep with me, leaving me very little of the bed. They definitely aren't spoiled.
63 posted on 09/29/2006 1:01:58 PM PDT by libstripper (!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys
"You are blackballing all renters based on your bias of pet owners. That is so narrow minded."
_____________________________

Apparently you will never "get it". The reason we do not allow pets is because it's good for business. Tenants stay longer, turn around costs are much less and tenant satisfaction is much higher. All it takes is one bad dog in a building for vacancy rates to start going up. Tenants move rather than confront a problem. I'm in business to feed my family and build a future for them that's why we no longer allow pets.

The idea that your pets are better behaved then most children is ridiculous. Your pets are domesticated animals. They may be nice company for you but in the eyes of the law they are just property. Your pets are not children and never will be.
64 posted on 09/29/2006 3:03:06 PM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: Fawn
Many people are very irresponsible and selfish when comes to animals.

True. I just spent most of this week at the local animal control shelter trying to get a sweet dog adopted. It is so sad to see how irresponsible some people are.

65 posted on 09/29/2006 3:10:56 PM PDT by ladyjane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

It still doesn't excuse you from eliminating responsible pet owners. It is so sad to live in a world that puts labels on undeserving people.


66 posted on 09/29/2006 3:15:26 PM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 64 | View Replies]

To: j. earl carter

"W'all, a pig that good you don't eat all to oncet . . . "


67 posted on 09/29/2006 3:21:48 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys

"It still doesn't excuse you from eliminating responsible pet owners."
_____________________________

Your thinking that you, and others like you, have a right to impose the consequences of your decisions on others is stunning. If you choose to own a pet that doesn't mean you have the right to impose the behavior of that pet on me or tenants who live in my buildings.

Are you a democrat? You think like one.


68 posted on 09/29/2006 3:25:08 PM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 66 | View Replies]

To: wmfights
The answer for the hardwood floors is a good quality polyurethane. Multiple coats. It laughs at dog AND cat pee. You can't possibly keep up a waxed hardwood floor in a rental property, and cheap polyurethane is a total waste of money and time.

Unless they're young marrieds on the way up or retirees taking it easy, a lot of renters are pretty irresponsible. When we were first married we lived in a 2nd floor walkup that was a bit old and creaky, and I was shocked to see how most of our fellow tenants abused the property. The 2nd bedroom in our unit had a new wood floor and new floor joists, because the previous tenant had kept THREE German Shepherds in there and apparently never let them out . . .

Talk about shocked, though . . . when the landlord came to do the walkthrough when we moved out, and found that we had not only cleaned the oven, stovetop, and fridge, but had spackled and primed all the shelf and picture frame holes in the wall, I thought he was gonna stroke out on the spot!

69 posted on 09/29/2006 3:27:19 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: wmfights
I have no intention of getting into this tiff but your statement "Do you have any idea what dog urine does to a hard wood floor if it's not cleaned up right away?" interests me. I have two homes, both with hardwood floors. I also have two dogs, both very well house-trained, but it is entirely possible that an accident has occurred that I did not see.

What damage does the urine do if not cleaned up right away?

70 posted on 09/29/2006 3:27:47 PM PDT by OldPossum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: the OlLine Rebel; wmfights
Amen on the idiots at PetSmart.

Get your vet to recommend an obedience trainer. Whatever you're going to do with your dog, a good foundation in obedience is an investment that pays big dividends.

71 posted on 09/29/2006 3:29:26 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 53 | View Replies]

To: OldPossum
It stains a waxed hardwood floor dark brown or black, it's the acid. Vomit if acidic will do the same thing.

It won't do a thing to the polyurethane, just sits there.

I've had both, had a waxed hardwood floor for 12 years and a poly for 10. Only problem with the poly is that it does scratch eventually, even the good stuff, and has to be sanded off and reapplied.

72 posted on 09/29/2006 3:31:41 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 70 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

You sound like a control freak that can't even open their mind to the possiblity of responsible pet ownership. Why is that so hard for you?


73 posted on 09/29/2006 3:37:53 PM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]

To: wmfights

Do you ban firearms too? That kind of thinking is a lot like the libs who want to ban ALL guns because they can't possibly consider the fact that there are responsible gun owners. You obviously don't understand the concept of personal responsilbility.


74 posted on 09/29/2006 3:42:05 PM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 68 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Thanks.


75 posted on 09/29/2006 4:12:54 PM PDT by OldPossum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: ladyjane

A friend of mine sent me a picture of this 16 year old dog that was on the animal control website. Someone dropped it off overnight in the cage....16 years old! (http://www.pbcgov.com/SNAP/sdog/A1269923.htm) Course some in here would just of shot it to death...save the gas. Not alot of heart out there....


76 posted on 09/29/2006 4:16:44 PM PDT by Fawn (http://www.jokaroo.com/funnyvideos/toilet_obsession.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 65 | View Replies]

To: OldPossum
One other note - if you let your poly wear through in high traffic areas, you can pick up some stains on the wood, especially if it's oak.

("Fumed oak" is stained artifically. Oak seems to react unhappily with a lot of acids, and wax will protect against water but not acids. I'll never have a waxed wood floor again - too much trouble to maintain!)

77 posted on 09/29/2006 4:55:51 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 75 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys
It's not a BAN per se, but the decision of the private property owner (landlord) whether dogs are worth the trouble. That's the essence of personal freedom, and the opposite of government interference e.g. in the banning of firearms.

I understand where he's coming from, I've never been a landlord, but I have seen some VERY irresponsible tenants. By and large, people don't appreciate what they don't own.

We did not have dogs when we lived in an apartment - we had cats. Now we own (in a non-restrictive covenant suburb!) and can jolly well do what we like with our own place.

But I think that a security deposit, to be employed towards repair/cleanup if the pets misbehave, is a reasonable compromise. Set the deposit high enough to pay for the cost of cleanup in most circumstances (I don't think six months rent covered the replacement of the wood floor and joists in the second BR in our old apartment, but that was an unusual situation.)

78 posted on 09/29/2006 4:59:41 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 74 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

It just makes me mad that nobody considers the responsible ones. I still don't think it's right to eliminate them just because they label all pet owners as irresponsible. When housing gets tight or circumstances come about and people have no choice but to rent an apartment temporarily, then the animals are going to suffer from all of these control freaks because they will end up at the pound.


79 posted on 09/29/2006 5:05:59 PM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 78 | View Replies]

To: mom4kittys
Unless you're in an area where the housing market is VERY restricted, competition between landlords will keep pets from being eliminated everywhere.

Atlanta has always had an apartment glut, especially if you don't insist on the high end properties like Post. Most individual landlords will negotiate with you, and the ordinary apartment manager will just ask for a pet deposit.

Even in the case of hotels and motels, there are some that will rent to people with pets (with a deposit) and some not. I go to the ones that let me bring my dog (I'm usually on my way to or from a dog trial when I'm in a hotel room) and I let the others know why they won't be getting my business . . . or the business of the other 100 or so folks who're coming to the dog trial!

80 posted on 09/29/2006 5:15:33 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 79 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

"I see people living in downtown Atlanta loft apartments with huge dogs - mastiffs and Great Danes"

I've owned both mastiffs and great danes. They were completely inside dogs. Both make wonderful apartment dogs. They have the metabolism of a rock. A short walk once a day is all it takes to make them happy. A typical day is move from the couch to the love seat. Take a nap. Move from the love seat to the bed. Take a nap. Move from the bed to the couch. Take a nap. Repeat.

BTW, they make wonderful afternoon nap buddies. They are experts at afternoon naps.


81 posted on 09/30/2006 3:49:42 AM PDT by DugwayDuke (Stupidity can be a self-correcting problem.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: DugwayDuke

I have a friend that has a great dane. Exactly like you described. Isn't it funny how people get hung up on the size of an animal?


82 posted on 09/30/2006 5:22:25 AM PDT by mom4kittys (If velvet could sing, it would sound like Josh Groban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 81 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
"It won't do a thing to the polyurethane, just sits there."
_________________________________

The poyurethane is probably the best, but the wood expands when humid and contracts when dry so the spacing between the boards will separate over time. When a dog urinates the urine will seep between the cracks and stain the wood. Sometimes the wood can be sanded, but after a 5-6 sandings the wood will have to be replaced. If you replace a small section the wood will not match the old wood. Also, when you patch the wood the thickness of the boards may vary from the rest of the floor. If you stain the entire floor to cover the damaged portion you darken the entire room, making it less attractive to perspective tenants.

Replacing a hardwood floor and having it resurfaced will cost approx $8-10.00 per sg. foot. If I have to redo 500 sg. ft. at $8.00 per foot that will be $4,000.00 just for the floor. How does a $400.00 deposit cover this, or the additional vacancy time to get the work done?
83 posted on 09/30/2006 7:11:47 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: wmfights
Regular inspection, sir. Regular inspection.

Almost any lease gives you the right to do so. You can use repairs as an excuse if you need to.

Interesting point, though. We've been in our current house for 10 years, it's 25 years old. The polyurethane was sanded down and refinished around 1990. It has not separated or cracked at all, and the boards have separated in only one place -- at a threshold between two rooms.

Before that, we lived in our old house from 1981 to 1994, and I never had separation between any boards. Of course, that was a waxed floor, so I had to be careful and renew the wax frequently to prevent stains (and I wasn't always careful, esp. in the kitchen, it got away from me in a couple of places. Which is why I prefer the poly.)

Both houses were not spec houses but custom (we built the first one ourselves) with oversized joists and short spacing between the joists, which probably has something to do with it.

84 posted on 09/30/2006 8:10:20 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 83 | View Replies]

To: DugwayDuke
The Great Dane I know is a very quiet girl.

My Labs are field line (one on site, one coming Wednesday!) and they are most definitely NOT.

"Afternoon nap? What's that? Why are you lying there when there are squirrels to chase and doves to bark at? Here, let me help you off the sofa!" < tug, tug, tug, bark, bark, bark >

85 posted on 09/30/2006 8:25:47 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 81 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
Regular inspection, sir. Regular inspection.

Almost any lease gives you the right to do so. You can use repairs as an excuse if you need to.
____________________________________

I understand you aren't in this business, so I'll try to explain. This is a business and the way you make money is by not having turn over. If we had time to inspect all the units the tenants would find it intrusive. Also, if upon doing an inspection we determined that the floors needed to be done how do you do this with a tenant in the apartment? Also, the smell until the polyurethane drys 12-24 hrs is very hard to live with. All these factors, tenant irritation, smell and impracticality of doing the work in an occupied unit leads to a simple solution NO PETS.

There is no way to determine who is going to be a responsible pet owner and who isn't. Eviction is a long expensive process and you lose good tenants who don't want to be around the problem during the process.

What we are seeing now is pet friendly buildings are have occupancy problems because pet owners are finding these buildings have aggressive animals in them and the buildings are not as well maintained. I know because I get calls from pet owners all the time and they tell me.
86 posted on 09/30/2006 9:17:01 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 84 | View Replies]

To: wmfights
I'm not sure where you are, but in GA landlords have it easy. Eviction is a VERY simple process before a magistrate.

I took a course once on "tenant's rights" - short answer, they ain't got any, not in Georgia anyhow.

You send the guy in to change the light bulbs or the furnace filter, he smells urine or faeces, you issue a warning if you like . . . or just start the eviction process. Excess turnover is certainly an issue, but who says a pet deposit has to be $400? One month's rent? Judgment for the excess damages?

I'm not in the real property rental business (don't have the patience or the temper for it) but my husband used to assist at evictions in his younger and wilder days (he and another large young man would accompany the petite 98 pound landlord when she served the notices, just to head off any trouble) so I've had a ringside seat, so to speak.

87 posted on 09/30/2006 11:44:23 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 86 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
"I took a course once on "tenant's rights" - short answer, they ain't got any, not in Georgia anyhow."
_______________________________

I'm in the socialist republic of Chicago. Landlord's have no rights. You have to be very careful screening because once they're in even with non-payment it can take 6+ months to get them out and will cost $1,500+.

There was a time when you could serve a ten day notice and the judge would throw them out immediately, but they won't even consider it anymore. FWIW, a 5 day notice is for non-payment, a 10 day notice is very creating problems ie. loud dog, stereo, not taking garbage down etc..
88 posted on 09/30/2006 11:55:13 AM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 87 | View Replies]

To: wmfights
Wow - it's a fur piece from CHI to GA . . . in more ways than one.

Around here, the market tends to take care of this sort of problem. The people with problem dogs go live in a dump with the other problem tenants, responsible dog owners live in middle-of-the-road places (or rent a house with a fenced back yard - you can actually find one pretty cheap), and the high-end folks rent one of the really expensive chi-chi places where they don't allow dogs OR children.

89 posted on 09/30/2006 11:58:26 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 88 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
"Wow - it's a fur piece from CHI to GA . . . in more ways than one."
_____________________________

In the high density parts of Chicago, you don't see much grass other than at parks or in the parkway between the sidewalk and the street. The phenomenon of the dogs in these areas is new. It really started up about 20-15 years ago when the suburban kids began moving to the city. More and more landlords are like myself where we have thrown up our hands and said no more, NO PETS. So the "dog people" as we call them are either in condo's or less well maintained buildings.

The dog parks were created to try and keep the dogs off the baseball/football/soccer fields that the kids use. The dog owners seem to think that children rolling around in dog urine and feces is okay. Even though these parks are marked, no dogs, the yuppies seem to think it doesn't apply to them.
90 posted on 09/30/2006 12:11:48 PM PDT by wmfights (Psalm : 27)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 89 | View Replies]

To: libstripper
I lived in apts from the age of 18 and always had at least one dog with me. They seemed very content with living in the apt as they always went on walks or runs with me in the evening. But I always longed for a nice house and expansive, fenced backyard to provide them. I was able to do that 7 years ago.

Now, in the morning before I head off to the office as they anxiously wait at the back door, I let them inside from their morning duties. And there they happily lounge until I return. My dogs firmly believe that backyards are overrated and apts really aren't so bad if communal living is your bag. And I'm not talking Poodles or Pomeranians here, either.

I think the key to successful living with dogs in apts is to ensure that they get plenty of daily exercise. There are a few breeds such as Border Collies/Australian Shepards that I wouldn't dream of keeping in an apt though.

91 posted on 09/30/2006 12:36:52 PM PDT by Dysart
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: libstripper

My dogs wish we still lived on 2.5 acres in rural TX. Unfortunately here in S. FL, even with a house, the size of the yard makes this about like apt. living. Sadly.
susie


92 posted on 10/01/2006 2:46:32 PM PDT by brytlea (amnesty--an act of clemency by an authority by which pardon is granted esp. to a group of individual)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

This is almost like apt. living. Our backyard is like a postage stamp, so we have to take walks. There is a dog park, but I've been a little afraid to take the girls there. They would probably enjoy it.
susie


93 posted on 10/01/2006 2:47:53 PM PDT by brytlea (amnesty--an act of clemency by an authority by which pardon is granted esp. to a group of individual)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: brytlea
Our backyard isn't all that big. The way back of our yard is flood plain, so it can't be fenced, it would all wash away!

The dog has a back yard that's about 75 feet by 50 feet -- not much for an active retriever. She has a figure 8 path mapped out so she can run pretty fast, but she can't get up to top speed.

Fortunately, there's a huge polo field down by the river about 1 mile away from the house, since she's E-collar conditioned now I can just let her run. She can get some real speed on if I get my kids to slingshot a bumper at the other end of a 200 yard field!

94 posted on 10/01/2006 2:55:00 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 93 | View Replies]

To: brytlea
BTW, I would stay away from dog parks.

The ones around here are outrageous - the gangstas bring their pit bulls and scare everybody to death, most dogs are untrained and just run wild. They're crowded, too small, and always dirty and torn up.

Most folks have a place they go, like our local polo field or a regular park. There's a park up the road where a lot of our friends go to train -- in the back of the park behind the maintenance buildings there's a big open field and a pond where nobody usually goes. The maintenance men don't mind if we train back there, so long as we pick up any dog deposits and take our dead ducks with us!

95 posted on 10/01/2006 2:57:25 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 93 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Yeah, in TX I could always find places to run the dogs, even when we lived in Midland in the city (well, ok, we thought of it as a city!). But here, there are not many places you can take your dog off leash. We do alot of walks, but I know they wuld like a good run (which I am too old and uncoordinated to do with them on leash! ;)
Our back yard is about the lenghth of the house (don't know that in yards, but the house is only 1800 sf) and maybe 12 ft. deep. Not alot of space. The little one loves to run jets around the yard, she's pretty amazing. I should have her in agility.
susie


96 posted on 10/01/2006 3:14:36 PM PDT by brytlea (amnesty--an act of clemency by an authority by which pardon is granted esp. to a group of individual)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 95 | View Replies]

To: brytlea

If you get her into agility, the club should have a big, open training field! Our club has a huge fenced yard, big enough for a standard agility ring (110 x 85), plus an indoor training area for when it rains - not quite as big, but it's in a warehouse, probably about 85 x 50.


97 posted on 10/01/2006 3:19:50 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 96 | View Replies]

To: libstripper

My apartment is not living with my dog.


98 posted on 10/01/2006 3:22:04 PM PDT by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin (Freedom is the freedom to discipline yourself so others don't have to do it for you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Well, she's not quite 6 months old yet, so not quite old enough to do agility. Darn... ;)
susie


99 posted on 10/01/2006 3:22:52 PM PDT by brytlea (amnesty--an act of clemency by an authority by which pardon is granted esp. to a group of individual)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 97 | View Replies]

To: brytlea
You should look into whether your local agility club offers a "puppy class". Ours does.

No jumping, but lots of clicker training, obedience, and obstacle familiarization with the jumps set on the bottom rung (4 inches isn't going to hurt a puppy!)

As soon as The Puppy to Be Named Later arrives (this Wednesday! Rah! Rah!) she's going to be in the puppy class, which just started a couple of weeks ago. I'll run her at 7, then run the Shelley Dog at 8.

The name of choice at the moment is Candlewood Rock 'n' Roll Ruby, with Candlewood Give My Love to Rose and Candlewood Black Cadillac as runners-up.

100 posted on 10/01/2006 3:31:09 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 99 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson