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Bataan fell on this date.

Posted on 04/09/2009 8:06:15 AM PDT by VR-21

On 9 April 1942 American and Filipino forces capitulated on the Bataan penninsula. It was the largest capitulation of forces in our country's history. Sick and starved after a little over four months fighting the Japanese army, the men of Bataan endured an atrocity that became known as the Bataan Death March. They then endured a terrible captivity for the remainder of the war. During the months of fighting, the men of Bataan believed that help was on the way, but they eventually realized that there was none. The following song came about then, which expressed their bitter dissapointment;

We're the Battling Bastards of Bataan.

No mama, no papa, no Uncle Sam,

No aunts, no uncles, no cousins, no nieces,

No pills, no planes, no artillery pieces

And nobody gives a damn.

The men of Bataan paid a terrible price, and today I wish for them to be remembered.



TOPICS: Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 04/09/2009 8:06:15 AM PDT by VR-21
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To: VR-21

bttt


2 posted on 04/09/2009 8:08:39 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: VR-21

It’s also the anniversay of the invasion of Norway and Denmark [1940], Lee’s surrender [1865], and the Mongol victory at Liegnitz [1241].


3 posted on 04/09/2009 8:11:19 AM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: VR-21

American Fell On This Date:

January 20th 2009


4 posted on 04/09/2009 8:12:32 AM PDT by Vaquero ("an armed society is a polite society" Robert A. Heinlein)
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To: VR-21

Also on this date in 1940, Hitler invaded Denmark and Norway.


5 posted on 04/09/2009 8:13:22 AM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: Fiji Hill

Read Ghost Soldiers.


6 posted on 04/09/2009 8:14:32 AM PDT by massgopguy (I owe everything to George Bailey)
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To: VR-21

This is sad.
God bless those brave men.


7 posted on 04/09/2009 8:15:41 AM PDT by LadyPilgrim ((Lifted up was He to die; It is finished was His cry; Hallelujah what a Savior!!!!!! ))
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To: PzLdr

I always post something on this date, and on May 6 to commemorate the dates when Bataan and Corregidor fell. I have a personal motive, as a 20 year old sergeant on Corregidor would later become my father. I grew up knowing several men who were PW’s at the hands of the Japanese, and as there is little mention of them nowdays and most of them are no longer with us I do this one thing to pay respect to them.


8 posted on 04/09/2009 8:23:52 AM PDT by VR-21
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To: VR-21

And those that survived the brutal march then faced the rest of the war in prisoner of war camps -— some in Manchuria (they with their tropical fighting clothes). It was horrific. These brave men ... these our best and brightest ... these are long remembered fighters. Thank you all who serve.


9 posted on 04/09/2009 8:27:45 AM PDT by the long march
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To: the long march
"And those that survived the brutal march then faced the rest of the war in prisoner of war camps -— some in Manchuria..."

My father (60th Coastal Artillery AA on Corregidor) spent most of his captivity at Hoten Camp in Mukden, Manchuria.

10 posted on 04/09/2009 8:32:29 AM PDT by VR-21
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To: VR-21

The men of Bataan are being remembered here today.

Thank you for this post.


11 posted on 04/09/2009 8:32:44 AM PDT by amom (Proud Tanker Mom)
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To: VR-21

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X00s61zZ9Ek&feature=related


12 posted on 04/09/2009 8:40:41 AM PDT by Dixiekraut (( Rommell...you magnificent bastard . I READ YOUR BOOK !!! ))
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To: VR-21
Thank you so much for posting this wonderful memorial. It really means a lot to me. I lost 3 uncles in the Bataan Death March. None of them were married so I know what it's like growing up with no uncles, aunts or cousins. The government pulled my dad off of a plane in the Canary Islands when they got word that his brothers had been killed. He was the sole surviving son. He had to finish the war training men at a base in CA because they wouldn't let him go back.

When his crew on the plane heard about my dad's brothers, they named their plane the "Chalk up" in memory of them. Their last name was Chalk. That plane was shot down on that mission and all the men on it were killed. Had they not pulled my dad off, he would have been killed too.

My mom's brother was also killed in the Bataan Death March. He is buried in the national cemetery in Manilla, PI. Last year I "met" some missionairies on line who lived in the UK. They were going to Manilla to start another orphanage there. When I told them about my uncle, they went to the cemetery, found his grave, took pictures and got a wonderful packet from the office at the cemetery, and they sent that to me. I will share those pictures with you in honor of all the others who are buried at this cemetery. My uncle's name was Carl Stober and that's why there are pictures of his grave. New Mexico lost a lot of men in the Bataan Death March.


13 posted on 04/09/2009 8:45:46 AM PDT by NRA2BFree (Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass. It is about learning how to dance in the rain!)
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To: NRA2BFree

My grandmother’s brother, my great uncle John, also died on the Bataan Death March. He was starved to death. RIP.


14 posted on 04/09/2009 8:47:20 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If you know how not to pray, take Joseph as your master, and you will not go astray." - St. Teresa)
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To: massgopguy; Mr. Mojo
Read Ghost Soldiers.

Another FReeper told me about that book and I read it. It was difficult to read, knowing that my three uncles were some of the ones who were killed in the actual march, but it was a great story of the courage those men showed going in there to rescue them the way they did.

15 posted on 04/09/2009 8:50:55 AM PDT by NRA2BFree (Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass. It is about learning how to dance in the rain!)
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To: NRA2BFree

Salute to these good men.

Thank you for sharing your story and the photos.


16 posted on 04/09/2009 9:02:30 AM PDT by amom (Proud Tanker Mom)
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To: NRA2BFree; Pyro7480

Please accept my respect, gratitude and reverence for your lost relatives. It’s long frustrated me that so many of our countrymen do not really know their story. God rest them.


17 posted on 04/09/2009 9:07:12 AM PDT by VR-21
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To: Pyro7480

May God rest his soul. It was a horrible time for all of them. They were murdered, starved and left to die from all kinds of diseases. The Japanese were brutal to them.


18 posted on 04/09/2009 9:09:00 AM PDT by NRA2BFree (Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass. It is about learning how to dance in the rain!)
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To: NRA2BFree; SandRat

In 1965, I believe, Imelda Marcos invited my scout Troop 351 BSA and Foreign Troop 1 Philippine Scouts to participate in the flag ceremony at the American Cemetery in Manila. We were standing just to the left of the space between the circular uprights in your picture.

I was leader and had several of our American scouts present in full uniform. We were graciously received by the wife of the President and Philippine hero Ferdinand Marcos. We had our backs to the opening and did not see the very low flying jets that streaked over us and scared us to death as they passed in salute. They were US Air Force from Clark Air Base.

Our Troop was composed of boys from the American School both American and not American. The non Americans were sons of diplomats or business men and were Foreign Troop 1. The Americans were a normal BSA troop, Phillippine District, Far East Council, Makati Rizal.


19 posted on 04/09/2009 9:10:24 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 . John Galt hell !...... where is Francisco d’Anconia)
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To: amom
Salute to these good men.

Thank you for sharing your story and the photos.

I'm glad I'm able to share the story of those brave men. I do hope there will be a day when I can thank them all for making the supreme sacrifice while serving in defense of America. May God rest their souls.

20 posted on 04/09/2009 9:16:05 AM PDT by NRA2BFree (Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass. It is about learning how to dance in the rain!)
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To: NRA2BFree

amen


21 posted on 04/09/2009 9:21:47 AM PDT by amom (Proud Tanker Mom)
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To: VR-21
I always post something on this date, and on May 6 to commemorate the dates when Bataan and Corregidor fell.

I get a lump in my throat every time I read these:


22 posted on 04/09/2009 9:28:42 AM PDT by Oatka ("A society of sheep must in time beget a government of wolves." –Bertrand de Jouvenel)
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To: VR-21
Please accept my respect, gratitude and reverence for your lost relatives. It’s long frustrated me that so many of our countrymen do not really know their story. God rest them.

Thank you so much! I never heard anything about the March either. Neither of my grandparents talked about losing their sons. My dad's mom had pictures of their son's caskets with the American Flag draping across them. By the time I started going to visit with them during the summer, it had been many years since they were killed, so they didn't talk about it. One time I asked my grandma who was in those caskets and she said "those are my sons who were killed in the war." That was it. She never said another word about it.

I heard more about it from my mother's side of the family because their son/brother was still buried in the Phillipines. Mom told me that my grandparents were poor during the war and didn't have the money to bring him back to the states so they buried him there. She always hoped that some day he would walk through that door since she never saw him in the casket, she held out hope that it might have been a mistake, and wasn't him. She grieved a lot over him. I can only imagine how difficult it was never really knowing for sure if that was him.

I think the government should have brought all of those men home. They abandoned them in the Death March and they abandoned them in the cemetery!

23 posted on 04/09/2009 9:34:20 AM PDT by NRA2BFree (Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass. It is about learning how to dance in the rain!)
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To: Oatka

Thank you for sharing that. I’ve never seen one of those before, and it certainly does capture the anguish of those last days and moments on “The Rock.” All the more so, because we know what lies ahead for Irving Strober. Thank you again, that was quite moving.


24 posted on 04/09/2009 9:40:47 AM PDT by VR-21
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To: bert

That must have been a great experience to get to meet Imelda and Ferdinand Marcos. The troops were probably thrilled to get to make such an exciting trip. The planes woke you guys up, did they? LOL That would have caused a weak knee or two. :o)


25 posted on 04/09/2009 9:50:29 AM PDT by NRA2BFree (Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass. It is about learning how to dance in the rain!)
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To: VR-21

Accept my gratitude and respect also.

I think that too many young people don’t know their history of World War II. I guess they don’t teach it in school much anymore.

Whenever I have talked to young people nowadays about history, they don’t seem to know a lot. They don’t know about the Bataan Death March. They don’t know how Jimmy Doolittle’s raid on Tokyo rallied the nation. They don’t know what happened at the Battle of Midway. They don’t know what happened at Dunkirk. They don’t know about Guadalcanal. They don’t know the significance of D-Day and the Normandy invasion.

They do know, however, about Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and how some people view these bombings as war crimes. They do know about the internment of Japanese-Americans, and how some people view that as a war crime. They do know about Pearl Harbor, but think that we somehow invited the attack.

I think they are being taught politically correct history in the schools. Sometimes I wish I was a teacher and could teach the kids real history.


26 posted on 04/09/2009 9:53:29 AM PDT by Dilbert San Diego
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To: VR-21

VR-21,

This is an appropriate first post for me! My forum name, 41st Infantry Division is in honor of my father. He, being part of the 41st, spent his service time in the Pacific.

On occasion he would speak of experiences he had in WWII. In many of these cases he would start off with the fact that they were there to pay back the enemy for the mistreatment of our guys in the Bataan Death March.

This slice of his life was intense - through all the fear and aspects of battle fatigue (similar to “With The Old Breed”), they kept going because of the conduct of the Japanese on Bataan. In his own words, “there was a reason to be there,” and this kept the 41st moving forward.

Later in life he had a few friends at Boeing that either survived, or knew someone that survived Bataan.

My memories are of the camaraderie between those men. As they talked they were 20 years old again, and I was fortunate enough to be part of the conversation all those years later.

I don’t mean to ramble on my first post, so I’ll sign off and salute VR-21’s father and those souls who struggled through the Bataan experience.


27 posted on 04/09/2009 9:57:52 AM PDT by 41st Infantry Division
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To: VR-21

Don’t blame you. One of my uncles [My Mom’s only brother to survive to adulthood] was killed by the Japanese on Guam. He had already been on Guadalcanal, and I believe, either Tarawa or Saipan. A lot of the Pacific War gets ignored.

So does a lot of North Africa [except, maybe, Kasserine], Sicily, and the bulk of the Italian campaign. In the post D-Day campaign, you don’t here a lot about the Bocage, the Huertgen Forest and the campaign in southern France. It should ALL be remembered


28 posted on 04/09/2009 12:05:12 PM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: bert

Uh-RAH!


29 posted on 04/09/2009 4:10:23 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country! What else needs said?)
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To: VR-21

MacArthur’s slip into Bataan and Corregidor was one of the most brilliant military moves in history.


30 posted on 04/09/2009 4:15:05 PM PDT by Boiling Pots (The Politicians think we're all stupid, and they're largely correct.)
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