Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Try 10 OSes You've Never Heard Of
PC Plus ^ | 22 January 2010 | Mike Saunders

Posted on 01/22/2010 8:39:10 AM PST by ShadowAce

After a wave of operating system releases, it’s easy to become somewhat bored with the software side of computing. Windows 7 is here and looking like the ‘real’ Vista for many; Mac OS X 10.6, meanwhile, adds spit-shine to Leopard and gives its engine a good tuning too. In the Linux camp, distributions are taking regular steps forward in usability. But it’s all become rather routine; a case of incremental improvement rather than revolution.

So where’s all the real fun happening? Where are the radical new ideas, the Wild West code commits and the geekery and hackery that really drive innovation? Well, it’s all going on in the alternative operating system world. There are hundreds of projects in varying stages of development, from small, one-man-band shows to serious attempts at mounting an assault on the desktop.

We’re going to look at 10 of the most intriguing open-source operating systems in this brave new world. In most cases these are available as CD ISO images that you can burn to CD-Rs and boot up for testing if you fancy it. Alternatively, a simpler approach is to use a PC emulator such as VirtualBox or Qemu. With these and similar tools you can use ‘.iso’ image files (or ‘.flp’ floppy disc images) as virtual drives, so there’s no need to write any physical media.

ReactOS

Goal: Run Windows apps on an open-source OS

Out of all the operating systems we looked at, ReactOS is the one most likely to have Steve Ballmer tossing chairs. Originally named FreeWin95, the developers’ original goal was to create a completely open-source clone of, you guessed it, Windows 95. As time went on, however, there was little serious code to show and it was clear that the NT code base was the future for Microsoft.

In 1998, ReactOS rose out of the ashes of FreeWin95. Early progress was slow, but in 2004 version 0.2.0 arrived with a usable desktop and respectable, albeit very limited, Windows compatibility. Today, ReactOS is based around a home-grown kernel, but the project makes heavy use of the WINE libraries that are popular for running Windows applications on Linux.

ReactOS is available as a Live CD or as an installable OS. Right now, it looks and feels much like Windows 2000. Chunky widgets abound, and the Start menu, taskbar, window buttons and so forth are where you’d expect to see them.

ReactOS is an open-source OS striving for Windows compatibility. Something for Redmond to think about?

So, is it compatible? Chasing Microsoft’s vast APIs is no easy job, especially with so many undocumented calls to fathom out, but ReactOS does an impressive job. Firefox (with Flash), MSN Messenger, OpenOffice.org, StarCraft, Diablo 2, Quake III arena and many more apps run acceptably well, albeit with the occasional crash. Newer versions of MS Office and Visual Basic have troubles, though. It’s an ongoing job.

At this point you may be asking: ‘Why would Microsoft be worried about an OS that still needs a lot more work?’ Sure, right now ReactOS is no threat to Redmond. But for the tens of millions of people on the planet who use Windows as a springboard for a web browser, word processor and Solitaire, ReactOS could one day be a completely free drop-in replacement. If the project receives commercial backing in the future, Microsoft’s response will be interesting to watch.

2 Haiku

Goal: Be a free reincarnation of BeOS

Sadly, BeOS never made the mainstream desktop impact that its supporters so passionately hoped for. This multimedia-focused operating system peaked in the late 1990s, but Microsoft’s stranglehold on the desktop prevented it from attaining anything more than relative obscurity.

Those days are gone, but the spirit of BeOS lives on. Haiku is named after BeOS’s error messages, many of which were quaintly fashioned in Japanese poetry format. Like BeOS, Haiku aims to be compatible with the small range of native BeOS programs. It’s available in raw hard drive image format, suitable for Qemu; CD-based versions are due out in the coming months.

Some may call the Haiku interface austere. For BeOS fans, though, it's supremely fast and neat.

Haiku’s interface is refreshingly minimal. Window title bars are reduced to small yellow tabs with a single close button, while the leaf button at the top-right of the desktop opens up a pseudo Start menu containing applications and settings. Even in an emulator, it runs at an impressive speed – see how many GLTeaPot demos you can run before the OS starts to stutter.

Even in its pre-alpha state, Haiku is shaping up well, with a wide range of included applications and utilities for desktop usage. When you open up a command line you may be surprised to find the Bash shell, although Haiku is in no way a Unix flavour. Of all the alternative OSes currently undergoing development, Haiku is the closest to achieving a stable, fully featured 1.0 release, although that day may still be a way off.

3 AROS

Goal: Recreate the glory days of AmigaOS

Astoundingly, AmigaOS lives on, despite Commodore’s bankruptcy 15 years ago. To its fans, the Amiga was revolutionary, offering graphics and sound in the late 1980s that put PCs to shame. It wasn’t without its problems, though: the lack of memory protection resulted in colossal crashes when a single app misbehaved. ‘Guru meditation’ error messages still haunt the memories of many.

AROS‘s aim is to provide an lightweight Amiga-compatible OS for modern machines, with source code compatibility with AmigaOS 3.1: in other words, if you have the source code for an old Amiga app, you can recompile it to run natively on AROS on an x86 chip.

AROS is blisteringly fast, just like the original AmigaOS, on a mere 7MHz M68K CPU.

Many versions of AROS are available, and you can even run it from inside Linux. For the best experience, though, grab the ‘pc-i386-boot-iso’ CD-R image and boot it. If you’re a former Amiga fan, you’ll probably well up when Wanderer, the Workbench replacement, loads up: aside from the modern lick of paint, it feels just like the glory days of AmigaOS. The filesystem layout is the same, right-clicking activates the menu at the top, and in the Extras/Demos folder you’ll find heaps of toys.

While AROS is undoubtedly attractive to those who pine after the great days of the Amiga, it’s an impressively swift and polished desktop OS in its own right. We don’t expect it to become massive overnight, but it’ll always have a hardcore army of fans.

4 Aranym

Goal: Keep the Atari ST/TT/Falcon alive

Atari ST fans have their own equivalent in Aranym. It’s a virtual machine that emulates a 68040 CPU and various Atari hardware components, on top of which sits AFROS, an open-source version of the TOS/GEM operating system. You can download it as a program that runs on top of your normal operating system, or alternatively grab the Live CD.

AFROS is – to be blunt – supremely ugly, but then GEM was never known for its looks. Nevertheless, it’s a sprightly performer, and Atari users will have no problem finding their way around. A Windows-esque program menu has been shoehorned into the bottom side of the screen, and on the whole it faithfully recreates Atari’s 16-bit machines: if you were an Atari fan in the ’90s and still have some old floppies lying around, you might be able to get your old apps running.

5 Syllable

Goal: Provide a user-friendly desktop OS

Thus far, all of the OSes we’ve looked at have been based on other OSes. Syllable, however, has been engineered from the ground up as a unique OS, with some inspiration from BeOS and AmigaOS. Originally known as AtheOS, the project development was forked after the lead developer effectively abandoned his work, and Syllable was born.

After booting from the Live CD, you can log in as the user ‘root’ with password ‘root’. The desktop is playfully colourful and clean: click the ‘S’ button at the top left to peruse the installed software. There’s the usual collection of desktop utilities, including a media player and WebKit-
based browser. It’s impressively fast and has the potential to be an excellent desktop OS for breathing new life into older machines.

The Syllable OS has a bright and cheerful desktop - it's just lacking in native software.

At version 0.6.6, Syllable is one of the most advanced alternative OSes around. Unfortunately, though, there’s a distinct lack of native software, and development on the project has slowed down in the last couple of years. If you’re interested in helping out on an OS project, then Syllable’s small but friendly team is a good place to start.

6 KolibriOS

Goal: Extreme performance and compact code size

Without a doubt, KolibriOS wins the award for the most ambitious project in this feature. It’s a fully fledged OS written entirely in assembly language. The KolibriOS team has managed to squeeze pre-emptive multitasking, a graphical desktop, TCP/IP networking, USB support, media playback and many other features onto a 1.44MB floppy disk.

A stunning showcase of assembly language programming is on show in KolibriOS. All this fits onto a single 1.44MB floppy disk.

Booting ‘kolibri.img’ brings you to the desktop in just a couple of seconds. There’s a Windows-like Start menu and taskbar along the bottom of the screen, and the desktop is littered with small utilities. It’s all tremendously impressive, and while KolibriOS will never challenge the main OS trio’s desktop supremacy, it shows what can be achieved with careful coding, especially as we’re so used to bloatware nowadays.

7 Plan 9

Goal: Research beyond Unix

After Unix had flown out of the Bell Labs nest in the 1970s, the developers kick-started a new research project to scratch their programming itches. Plan 9 aimed to expand beyond the Unix philosophy of representing almost everything as a file: in Plan 9, even network connections and the user interface can be manipulated via the filesystem. Additionally, a communication protocol named 9P was developed to allow Plan 9 machines to share resources.

Ultimately, Plan 9 hasn’t achieved anywhere near the same level of success as Unix. However, it’s still undergoing development and is a source of new ideas for OS programmers. The desktop feels quaintly old-
fashioned today – somewhat akin to the old-school X setups of the late ‘80s – but then, it’s designed primarily to satisfy the needs of Plan 9 programmers. This is not an OS that’s going to appeal to many users, but it’s an interesting piece of research.

8 FreeDOS

Goal: Maximum compatibility with DOS software

While ReactOS’s ambitions are seriously lofty, FreeDOS has a considerably simpler job: running DOS programs. That still involves plenty of work, of course, but DOS has essentially been fixed in place for the last decade, so there aren’t new APIs to chase around and implement. Two CD ISOs are available: Fdbasecd, a small 8MB base system with limited functionality; and Fdfullcd, a 153MB beast packed with software and drivers.

The full version boots into an installer or Live mode. In use, it feels just like the DOS of yore: navigating around directories is the same, there’s an excellent EDIT clone and you can even use the mouse with certain text mode apps. Enter menu to launch the supplied programs and games (there’s even a version of FreeDoom included). If you want a graphical desktop, start up OpenGEM.

9 Visopsys

Goal: Small OS focused on disk partitioning

All of the projects covered so far have been the work of many people. Visopsys, however, is particularly striking because it’s almost entirely the work of one developer, Andy McLaughlin. Since he wrote the first lines of code in 1997, McLaughlin has focused on “cherry-picking the best ideas from other operating systems” and produced a compact OS with powerful partition management tools. It even has some spin-off software (see www.partitionlogic.org.uk).

The Visopsys OS aims to take the best features other OSes offer and roll them into a ssytem no bigger than a floppy disk.

Currently there’s little in the way of native software – it’s mostly small utilities and desktop tools. Still, Visopsys squeezes onto a single floppy disc, and demonstrates what can be achieved with time and determination.

10 Minix

Goal: Small Unix variant and a learning tool

Minix is famous within the alternative OS world for two reasons. First, it was the platform on which Linus Torvalds developed the first version of Linux; and secondly, its code is covered extensively in Operating Systems: Design and Implementation, a book written by the Minix author.

Don't be put off by Minix's austere looks - it is in fact a fantastic OS and a great place for budding developers.

While the first versions of Minix were designed exclusively as learning tools, Minix 3 expands the boundaries further, with low-spec and embedded machines being the main hardware target. Compared to Linux and the BSD family it’s not the most feature-rich Unix flavour on the planet, but as a code and design resource for OS developers, it’s fantastic.


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: oses
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-76 next last

1 posted on 01/22/2010 8:39:10 AM PST by ShadowAce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW; ...

2 posted on 01/22/2010 8:39:36 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Now this is the kind of diversity I like!


3 posted on 01/22/2010 8:43:22 AM PST by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Thanks for posting this. I will never ever buy another Windows product after Vista and I am looking for something different. Vista really was the nail in the Microsoft office. I consider Microsoft a a bad virus at this point always snooping and “updating” (they mean disabling) your computer. I would like to hear more opinions. Bookmark!


4 posted on 01/22/2010 8:44:37 AM PST by momincombatboots (Ambition: climbing over others to make it; Passion: arriving while everyone enjoyed the climb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Heaven help the person who has enough time on their hands (i.e. so little meaningful in their lives) to develop an amiga clone OS for modern hardware...


5 posted on 01/22/2010 8:44:48 AM PST by paulycy (Demand Constitutionality.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: paulycy

LOL—I never did own/use an Amiga.


6 posted on 01/22/2010 8:45:45 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: momincombatboots
I would like to hear more opinions.

Switch to decaf.

7 posted on 01/22/2010 8:46:44 AM PST by Future Snake Eater ("Get out of the boat and walk on the water with us!”--Sen. Joe Biden)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: momincombatboots
Just be careful of these options. Most are not yet ready for prime-time. But they are fun to look at.

I'm actually excited about #6--Kolibiri

8 posted on 01/22/2010 8:47:19 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
Well, I'll keep working on my "real computer"... LOL...

IMSAI 8080 Microcomputer System


9 posted on 01/22/2010 8:48:42 AM PST by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

My Amiga 1200 sits next to my - Windows 7 PeeCee, and my iMac. Talk about diversity... Amiga was the IT, well for a couple years anyway then management ran it off the cliff.

Cool list... Haiku is pretty nice, BeOS was a cool OS... (but cool ain’t enough)


10 posted on 01/22/2010 8:48:50 AM PST by xenob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Linux/BSD/Unix/BeOS people never knew how to design squat from a UI point of view.


11 posted on 01/22/2010 8:48:58 AM PST by smith288 (Peace at all costs gives you tyranny free of charge)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

I use Kolibri on a 512 MB thumb drive, and it works GREAT! It boots in less than 15 seconds on my old Proforma Pentium laptop, and I can do most any basic stuff (web, email) from it without a hiccup.


12 posted on 01/22/2010 8:49:21 AM PST by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
LOL—I never did own/use an Amiga.

Me neither. Watched 'em. Laughed. Moved on.

13 posted on 01/22/2010 8:50:05 AM PST by paulycy (Demand Constitutionality.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: smith288
Linux/BSD/Unix/BeOS people never knew how to design squat from a UI point of view.

You can't be serious, or haven't looked at a modern Linux/BDS distro...
14 posted on 01/22/2010 8:50:51 AM PST by xenob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
Gee, I had my own list (off the top of my head):

1. CP/M 2.2, the 8-bit Z80 standard! (CP/M86 for those who are stuck in x86 land) 2. AmigaOS with Intuition interface 3. BeOS-Amiga for the '90s! 4. NeXTstep-Why settle for Apple's kludge when you can have the original? 5. AtariST OS with GEM (Graphical Environment Manager, also available for Ventura Publisher on the IBM PC AT) 6. MSX, the 8 bit standard by Microsoft. A stable standard minted in the 80s and adopted by a variety of Japanese computer desktop manufactrurers, and SpectraVideo/Bondwell. 7. OS8. You need a mini-computer like a PDP-8 to run it, but it can generate 4KB virtual machines. You can also repair the core memory and papertape yourself with a little training. 8. So many other proprietary systems with their own plusses: Acorn, DEC Rainbow DOS, Coleco's ADAM with Apple II (almost) compatible BASIC.
15 posted on 01/22/2010 8:52:20 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Star Traveler
I have one of those. I'm looking for a 4K memory card for it.

/johnny

16 posted on 01/22/2010 8:52:23 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
Gee, I had my own list (off the top of my head):

1. CP/M 2.2, the 8-bit Z80 standard! (CP/M86 for those who are stuck in x86 land)

2. AmigaOS with Intuition interface

3. BeOS-Amiga for the '90s!

4. NeXTstep-Why settle for Apple's kludge when you can have the original?

5. AtariST OS with GEM (Graphical Environment Manager, also available for Ventura Publisher on the IBM PC AT)

6. MSX, the 8 bit standard by Microsoft. A stable standard minted in the 80s and adopted by a variety of Japanese computer desktop manufactrurers, and SpectraVideo/Bondwell.

7. OS8. You need a mini-computer like a PDP-8 to run it, but it can generate 4KB virtual machines. You can also repair the core memory and papertape yourself with a little training.

8. So many other proprietary systems with their own plusses: Acorn, DEC Rainbow DOS, Coleco's ADAM with Apple II (almost) compatible BASIC.


17 posted on 01/22/2010 8:52:52 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (There is no salvation in politics)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

What are these? OSes for losers?


18 posted on 01/22/2010 8:54:52 AM PST by streetpreacher (Arminian by birth, Calvinist by the grace of God)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
Interesting.

One of those smaller OSs might be perfect for cleaning up a system infected with spyware, malware or a nasty virus if they would package some AV software with it.

19 posted on 01/22/2010 8:55:15 AM PST by smokingfrog (You can't ignore your boss and expect to keep your job... www.filipthishouse2010.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

interesting.

Of course I can’t even understand how to make a Live CD.
lol.


20 posted on 01/22/2010 8:55:46 AM PST by GeronL (http://tyrannysentinel.blogspot.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
Sadly, BeOS never made the mainstream desktop impact that its supporters so passionately hoped for.

I remember BeOS' final days, when they were giving away copies of the OS for free.

I think I still have a copy around here somewhere, if anyone wants it.

21 posted on 01/22/2010 8:58:08 AM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: streetpreacher

OS’s for very very bored nerds with nothing else to do.

lol.

Some of the Linux stuff looks pretty good. Another plus for linux is they have the Scorched 3D game. dang them.


22 posted on 01/22/2010 9:00:26 AM PST by GeronL (http://tyrannysentinel.blogspot.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

Thanks. You have just rescued me from boredom death for another few months.


23 posted on 01/22/2010 9:01:43 AM PST by blogOps (don't bite me. i'm newbie)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: momincombatboots
I would like to hear more opinions.

For you.

24 posted on 01/22/2010 9:02:19 AM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

What is this “floppy disk” of which they speak?


25 posted on 01/22/2010 9:04:16 AM PST by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: momincombatboots

I understand your dislike of MS but suggest you have a friend show you Windows 7. I was ready to go the Linux route after Vista, then got a free upgrade to Windows 7 on my new Dell laptop. It’s slick, fast and has yet to crash (3 months on).


26 posted on 01/22/2010 9:05:08 AM PST by tgusa (Gun control: deep breath, sight alignment, squeeze the trigger ....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Cyber Liberty

Ping to self for later, when I have my Parallels machine....


27 posted on 01/22/2010 9:08:19 AM PST by Cyber Liberty (Kill them until they stop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

I wonder if they can write an OS to emulate my beloved TI-99/4A?

:-)


28 posted on 01/22/2010 9:12:49 AM PST by DemforBush (Now officially 100% ex-Democrat.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
What is this “floppy disk” of which they speak?

And how long has it been since "floppy disks" were actually floppy?

29 posted on 01/22/2010 9:19:33 AM PST by thulldud (It HAS happened here!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

“in Plan 9, even network connections and the user interface can be manipulated via the filesystem.”

Oh, to be able to rm a socket.


30 posted on 01/22/2010 9:20:49 AM PST by Darth Reardon (Im running for the US Senate for a simple reason, I want to win a Nobel Peace Prize - Rubio)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DemforBush
TI-99/4A

Now THAT was a real computer.

31 posted on 01/22/2010 9:24:25 AM PST by LearnsFromMistakes (Yes, I am happy to see you. But that IS a gun in my pocket.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: tgusa
I understand your dislike of MS but suggest you have a friend show you Windows 7.

I've had a chance to install Windows 7.

Same crap in a new wrapper. It's one claim to fame: it's not as bad as Vista. And some people even dispute that.

Windows 7 vulnerable to 8 out of 10 viruses.

Windows 7 more vulnerable to malware than Vista, says researcher

Get back to me when Microsoft builds an OS that isn't a host for botnets.

Or when Microsoft builds an OS that can't be taken down by a faulty user-land program.

32 posted on 01/22/2010 9:24:49 AM PST by Knitebane (Happily Microsoft free since 1999.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: paulycy
In the Amiga days I was a developer on a mini multi-user system that used the 68000 processor. It didn't take us long to discover we could use the Amiga as a workstation on the Alpha Micro and a lot of the code we wrote for the AM system was really good for the Amiga too. It made a really neat color workstation since those from AM were all green or orange. Ah, the good ol’ days of the 80’s!
33 posted on 01/22/2010 9:24:58 AM PST by jwparkerjr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: momincombatboots

My first 'personal' computer

34 posted on 01/22/2010 9:27:03 AM PST by NCjim ("You can't pick up a turd by the clean end", Bob Lonsberry on Obamacare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: smith288
Linux/BSD/Unix/BeOS people never knew how to design squat from a UI point of view.

That's why they let the XOrg & XFree86 developers do the GUIy bits. The OS shouldn't be concerned with the 'click & drool' side of things.

35 posted on 01/22/2010 9:29:17 AM PST by dread78645 (Evolution. A doomed theory since 1859.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Knitebane

Just sayin’ that my experience with Windows 7 has been a good one - haven’t been hit with a virus or any malware. It has yet to crash. I’m happy with it thus far.


36 posted on 01/22/2010 9:47:08 AM PST by tgusa (Gun control: deep breath, sight alignment, squeeze the trigger ....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana
I knew I shouldn't have given away my DEC tower.
That thing was built like a tank!


37 posted on 01/22/2010 9:52:31 AM PST by smokingfrog (You can't ignore your boss and expect to keep your job... www.filipthishouse2010.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: smokingfrog

And no woman who looked that good ever sat at one again ...


38 posted on 01/22/2010 10:23:59 AM PST by Betis70 (Never Forget)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

On my old PC I used to quad boot 4 OSes, Windows, Linux, BeOS, and one called QNX. Ah, those were the days......


39 posted on 01/22/2010 10:34:31 AM PST by machman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

I’d heard of 6 of them. I guess that means I’m not too far gone, yet... :)


40 posted on 01/22/2010 10:57:28 AM PST by Señor Zorro ("The ability to speak does not make you intelligent"--Qui-Gon Jinn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tgusa

Never, ever will I have another Windows product! I don’t care if they hand out gold bullion with it.


41 posted on 01/22/2010 10:57:31 AM PST by momincombatboots (Ambition: climbing over others to make it; Passion: arriving while everyone enjoyed the climb)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: momincombatboots

-shrugs- Your choice, it’s a free country (at least for now). I object more to MS’s predatory policies. But that’s just me.


42 posted on 01/22/2010 11:04:21 AM PST by tgusa (Gun control: deep breath, sight alignment, squeeze the trigger ....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce

The two that impress me are KolibriOS, because I miss the amazingly tight and fast old-time programs written in assembly, and Minix because of its extremely robust pure microkernel architecture.


43 posted on 01/22/2010 11:32:58 AM PST by antiRepublicrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
Lets see. I've heard of:

BeOS/Haiku
AmigaOS/AROS
Plan 9
FreeDOS
Minix

I too am intrigued by KolibriOS. Assembler coded; man that must scream on a modern processor. But I have no machines with working floppies. Will it boot off a 5 in 1 card reader (SD)? Or USB thumb drive?

44 posted on 01/22/2010 11:56:43 AM PST by AFreeBird
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DemforBush; LearnsFromMistakes

“TI-99/4A

Now THAT was a real computer.”

In 1985 a friend and I wrote a fully functioning football statistics system in BASIC for the TI-99. We used it to provide real-time statistics for the radio broadcast of the local high school football games. Adapted it the next year to do basketball as well.

Those were the grand old days of personal computing. I would kill to have a copy of that code today.


45 posted on 01/22/2010 12:15:28 PM PST by NerdDad (Aug 7, 1981, I married my soul mate, CDBEAR. 28 years and I'm still teenager-crazy in love with her.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: AFreeBird

Not sure, but I think so. I once installed it into a 256MB VM and it ran very well.


46 posted on 01/22/2010 12:15:55 PM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: thulldud
I put some of my old floppies to good use:

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

47 posted on 01/22/2010 12:19:10 PM PST by shorty_harris
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: shorty_harris

Hey, good one!


48 posted on 01/22/2010 1:38:29 PM PST by thulldud (It HAS happened here!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: xenob
You can't be serious, or haven't looked at a modern Linux/BDS distro...

Oh i have. Ubuntu is the only one I have seen I deem pretty enough for the normal ID10T user to use

49 posted on 01/22/2010 1:48:28 PM PST by smith288 (Peace at all costs gives you tyranny free of charge)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: streetpreacher
What are these? OSes for losers?

Because in your view what defines a "winner" or "loser" is the OS they choose to use on their computer?

Not successful happy healthy children, material wealth, job success and/or satisfaction, one's relationship with God or even how articulate you can be on a political board? No, with you its... the OS one runs on their computer.

How interesting it must be to be around you.

50 posted on 01/22/2010 2:54:46 PM PST by MichiganMan (Oprah: Commercial Beef Agriculture=Bad, Commercial Chicken Agriculture=Good...Wait, WTF???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-76 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson