Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Gun re-bluing, anybody?

Posted on 10/23/2010 5:46:18 PM PDT by djf

Anybody have any XP re-bluing guns? Recommendations? Products? Techniques?

I have an Ivers-Johnson .22 revolver and used Perma-Blue on it an would describe the results as "so so..."

Am I missing something?


TOPICS: Hobbies
KEYWORDS: banglist; blueing; bluing; gunblue
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-61 next last

1 posted on 10/23/2010 5:46:18 PM PDT by djf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: djf

describe so-so


2 posted on 10/23/2010 5:50:49 PM PDT by JohnD9207 (John McCain is a proud Ted Kennedy conservative!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

Blueing on a gun is much like to paint on a car. The smooth even finish is almost always due to the prep work on the underlying metal.


3 posted on 10/23/2010 5:51:20 PM PDT by An Old Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

Hot bluing is the best.


4 posted on 10/23/2010 5:52:05 PM PDT by mountainlion (concerned conservative.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

Hot Blueing or Cold blueing... Hot blueing does a much better job, but requires a good dedicated setup. ( usually easier to have it done by a gunsmith).


5 posted on 10/23/2010 5:53:54 PM PDT by Waverunner (")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf
Degreasing is the most important step, ANY grease or oil will mess things up. Birchwood Casey makes an extra strength cold blue, 10 or 12 bucks a bottle but it's very good.

Keep in mind that if any screws or parts aren't removed oil will seep out after cleaning. You don't need to remove the barrel, just clean that joint over and over until any seepage is removed.

6 posted on 10/23/2010 5:55:43 PM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, A Matter Of Fact, Not A Matter Of Opinion)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

Hot bluing is definitely the way to go.

Of course, it’s a dirty, corrosive business. I’d send it out to a shop that specializes in it.


7 posted on 10/23/2010 5:56:34 PM PDT by Malsua
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf
For an entire gun you'd best hot blue. Perma blue is more for touch ups.

This is supposed to be a good manuel.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=364524

This might be worth a try.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=958388

8 posted on 10/23/2010 5:58:36 PM PDT by Eagles6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JohnD9207

Well, blue. Much better than it was. But not uniform darkness.

I degreased using a good detergent and 0000 steel wool, so I’m pretty confident it was good and clean to start.


9 posted on 10/23/2010 5:59:22 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Malsua

Hot bluing by a pro is the way to go. How many of us could successfully spray paint a car after spending hour sanding it down in preparation?

I do lots of things so I am not afraid of doing things myself, but this is for pros if you want a pro finish.


10 posted on 10/23/2010 6:00:14 PM PDT by american_ranger
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: american_ranger

I hear what you’re sayin, but the gun cost me 50 bucks.
I ain’t gonna spend 200 to get it blued!!!

That’s why I decided to try it with what is practically a throw away, that way I at least learn something!


11 posted on 10/23/2010 6:02:55 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: djf

Like others have said, Hot bluing is what you want. Now, if you cant or dont want to pay a gunsmith to do it.. I have had some seriously good luck with a product called blue wonder

http://www.bluewonder.us/ Its very simple to use, the biggest part (as with any refinishing job) is prep. you have to get the gun 100% clean no finger prints, no rust, no oils.

I also do my own parkerizing here at my house.. its a MUCH simpler process than bluing and gives a nice flat black long lasting finish.


12 posted on 10/23/2010 6:04:18 PM PDT by eXe (Si vis pacem, para bellum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #13 Removed by Moderator

To: SWAMPSNIPER

VERY interesting!! Thanks!!


14 posted on 10/23/2010 6:11:29 PM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion......the Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: sfg-18b

????


15 posted on 10/23/2010 6:13:54 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

Denatured alcohol is what I use to degrease. Use it outdoors, the vapors can ignite. Wear white cotton gloves to keep your skin oils away from the metal.


16 posted on 10/23/2010 6:16:46 PM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, A Matter Of Fact, Not A Matter Of Opinion)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: djf

OK, you didn’t degrease/de-oil well enough.

First, the 0000 steel wool you used? Did you de-oil that? Because unless it is the type of steel wool you obtain through woodworking outlets, the steel wool probably had some oil in it as well.

To de-oil steel wool, you dunk it in acetone. Or you could buy some 0000 non-oiled steel wool through an outfit like woodworker.com.

OK, next, you need to clean the gun parts. Acetone is the first step in de-greasing. Brownell’s sells a degreaser called “Dicro-Clean 909,” which is used in hot water (just below the boiling point) to dunk gun parts into for 10 minutes to finish stripping any oils off the gun.

But let’s back up a bit: How is the polish on the piece? Blue results are all predicated upon a good polishing job. You need to polish the surface to 320 to 400 grit - no finer, no coarser. If the polish job is uneven, then so will the blueing job.

Lastly, since you lack the facility for hot caustic blueing, might I recommend rust blueing? It will take some patience on your part, but the results can be VERY good, and slow rust blueing is what is still used today on the very finest firearms. If you’re curious, I can explain the process, or I could give you a “fast rust blueing” process, both of which you can easily accomplish at home, without lots of equipment.


17 posted on 10/23/2010 6:19:16 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Waverunner

Hot blueing is a lot harder to do as you have to ramp the temperature up gradually and not too fast. Probably not the best thing to try first as a novice.


18 posted on 10/23/2010 6:22:00 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: djf

I have a .38 Iver Johnson from the 1890s that still looks like brand new. Shoots good too except I have to use black powder cartridges in it. Not made for smokeless. Good little revolvers.


19 posted on 10/23/2010 6:22:52 PM PDT by Inyo-Mono (Had God not driven man from the Garden of Eden the Sierra Club surely would have.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: djf
I hear what you’re sayin, but the gun cost me 50 bucks. I ain’t gonna spend 200 to get it blued!!!

If you check around some of the gunsmithing forums, you might find someone in your area who does this sort of work out of their garage for a fraction of what a "brick and mortar" gun shop would charge.

Another thought: hot blueing involves an immersion tank large enough to hold a barrelled rifle action. If you tell the gunsmith about the cost concerns, he might make a deal with you if you're willing to wait until he has another customer and needs to use the blueing tanks. He could probably put your revolver in at the same time as the other customer's gun parts.

20 posted on 10/23/2010 6:23:38 PM PDT by Charles Martel ("Endeavor to persevere...")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: NVDave

Thanks!

In fact it may be a question of me just re-doing it a few times. The guy at the gun show where I bought it said when he had a shop he would do 3 or 4 apps with it before he got the best results.

Like I said, I’m just trying it because I like to try new things and be able to do a halfway decent job. Or at least not do a half-azzd job!


21 posted on 10/23/2010 6:24:11 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Secret Agent Man

I would recommend that people not equipped with the right equipment never do hot blueing.

The chemicals are highly corrosive - and are composed mostly of sodium hydroxide. Your clothes, shoes, skin, you name it are all fair game if you splash some out of the tank. The blueing salts will be nearly 300F when at operational temperature, and HIGHLY reactive on anything they touch.

Disposal is problematic as well.


22 posted on 10/23/2010 6:25:15 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: djf

I can’t name any offhand but there are some spray on finishes available now which are supposed to be reasonably durable and easy to apply.

I am sure Brownells would have them.

I have had pretty bad luck with cold blue except oddly enough, the very first one I did. I had a Colt Challenger (a slightly cheaper version of the Woodsman) which was mechanically excellent but most of the bluing was worn off.

I bought some cold blue, read the instructions and it came out fine. I am certain that the steel used in the gun was why it worked. I later traded it to a gunsmith for a near new 03A3 Springfield with a Redfield receiver sight, a sourdough front and a thousand rounds of Lake City, Match.

The guy I traded it to was a gunsmith and he did not recognize it as a cold blue until I told him. He then smelled it and then recognized it was. He said I did a great job on it, but actually it just happened to turn out right.


23 posted on 10/23/2010 6:32:31 PM PDT by yarddog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

That could be. You will want to “card” the finish with a .005” bristle wire brush between coats.

Here’s what is going on in all blueing processes: You’re rusting the gun.

There are two types of rust on steel: “red” rust (Fe02) and “black” rust (Fe03). You’re causing black rust to happen, and black rust is complete oxidation of the outer layer of steel, which cannot progress any further.

When you get a “light” blue, it means that the oxidation didn’t happen as easily on the light areas as on the dark areas. Something kept the metal in the light area from oxidizing as completely. That “something” could be oil, it could be finish, or it could be that you didn’t apply the chemical wet enough in that area, (ie you applied the cold blue solution unevenly).

This is where carding comes in. You card the surface of the steel, getting rid of any loose oxidation, stirring up a little surface fuzz, and then you apply the chemicals again.

BTW — when blueing, you really do need to disassemble the gun to get a good result. The cold blueing chemicals work well when you’re going to do touch-ups on scratches and such, but for a whole-gun job, a complete break-down is necessary.


24 posted on 10/23/2010 6:34:25 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Inyo-Mono

This one is very, very similar to the Ruger .22 Target revolver...

Nice little gun fer plinking around!


25 posted on 10/23/2010 6:36:21 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: NVDave

Thanks!

I knew it was actually some form of rusting that was going on.

One of the sites I hit when I searched Perma Blue said to do 2 to 4 apps, and then, when you are as happy as you can be, RE-OIL it.

The oil supposedly evening out the results.

We’ll see. App #2 is on it now.


26 posted on 10/23/2010 6:41:44 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: NVDave

Thanks!

I knew it was actually some form of rusting that was going on.

One of the sites I hit when I searched Perma Blue said to do 2 to 4 apps, and then, when you are as happy as you can be, RE-OIL it.

The oil supposedly evening out the results.

We’ll see. App #2 is on it now.


27 posted on 10/23/2010 6:41:52 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: djf

Yes, you should re-oil after the blueing process - any blueing process. Brownells sells a product for that too:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1086/Product/WATER_DISPLACING_OIL__AFTER_BLUING__RUST_PREVENTION

You could use WD-40, but NB that you should apply some other oil after the WD-40 has displaced the water and dries off, because WD-40 will dry off one day. That’s its job. CLP is as good as most anything out there, with the exception of very high-tech rust preventers.


28 posted on 10/23/2010 6:44:56 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: NVDave

Rust bluing? People still do that? I thought that went away 40 years ago.


29 posted on 10/23/2010 6:47:59 PM PDT by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

Comment #30 Removed by Moderator

To: djf

I just looked it up and one finish which you simply spray on and bake in an oven is Brownells’ Gun-Kote.

It is said to be much more durable than blue.


31 posted on 10/23/2010 7:19:38 PM PDT by yarddog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mamelukesabre

On the kind of firearms you buy at Walmart, yes, you no longer see it. Most of what you see these days on cheaper firearms is a spray-on finish or parkerizing of some sort.

On the kind of firearms that cost $3K and up? Bespoke shotguns and rifles?

Oh, no, it never went anywhere. And it won’t, either.

Here’s why you might not want to do hot caustic blueing:

1. You have any parts that are soldered or brazed on the gun. On fine shotguns, for example, the ribs are soldered on.

2. You have a gun that you’re not going to completely disassemble to blue.

3. You don’t want to set up a set of tanks for hot blueing.

When you’re making a firearm for someone who has been waiting for a year or more for their gun to be completed, and they’re paying $3K to $10K (and up) for it, then waiting the two to three weeks for a slow rust blue job isn’t that much of a hardship.

For the guy who bought a used gun for $400 that is all banged and scratched up, he’s not going to wait the three weeks, nor pay the money, for a slow rust blue job.

For those who want a faster rust blue job, there’s chemicals like this:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=7604/Product/BELGIAN_BLUE

The description given in the product is a “fast rust blue” but it is still in the category of “rust blueing.”

Here’s a video from Midway USA doing fast rust blueing. Larry is calling this “slow rust blueing,” but he’s wrong. This is “fast rust blueing” because you can be done in, oh, four hours.

Slow rust bluing is very different, and involves a “sweat box” and several weeks of attention.

Here’s one of the chemical mixtures for slow rust blueing:

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=22820/Product/CLASSIC_RUST_BLUE

If you don’t like buying a solution, you can find references to the slow rust solutions in older gunsmithing books (ie, any book published before 1960 should contain something on SRB).

In SRB, you have a “sweat box” made of plastic-lined wood that can be closed to be air-tight-ish into which you put the part. A 100 watt light bulb is placed at the bottom of the sweat box, and above that, you have a pan of nitric acid. The heated acid gives off corrosive fumes, which coat the part evenly.

Every three to four days, you pull the parts out of the sweat box, card them off and put them back into the sweat box. The total process might take as long as three+ weeks.

The biggest reason why the market got away from rust bluing wasn’t the result: it was the time involved. You can’t do rust blueing in huge industrial processes. You can do hot blue jobs in industrial lots - once the surface prep and degreasing is done, you just move the parts from tank to tank to tank in sequence and you get the results you want. There’s no carding between coats.

The reason why rust blueing fell out of favor was never the results. Genuine slow rust blueing is the most durable of all types of blueing. Lots of time spent in corrosive fumes means that the black rust has lots of time to form and become more solid.


32 posted on 10/23/2010 7:24:22 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: sfg-18b

Parkerizing is a pretty simple process that could conceivably done at home by people. You’d need two steel tanks, one of hot wash, the other of hot phosphate solution, and a third running water rinse.

The process is very simple and almost foolproof. It also hides a *few* surface imperfections.


33 posted on 10/23/2010 7:26:59 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: djf

I make a living doing bluing and other gunsmithing/gunbuilding. There are some processes that can be done at home without huge investments. Research the different processes and figure out what works for you. Any cold bluing from a bottle is crap.


34 posted on 10/23/2010 7:27:19 PM PDT by ExpatGator (I hate Illinois Nazis!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

Brownells has a cold-blue product called Oxpho-blue.
Not as durable as hot bluing or rust bluing, but it is very simple to apply. Just keep putting on coats until it is dark enough for you.

http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1072/Product/OXPHO_BLUE_reg_


35 posted on 10/23/2010 7:29:45 PM PDT by Elderberry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mamelukesabre

High dollar guns are still rust blued. I do it on some restorations.


36 posted on 10/23/2010 7:36:05 PM PDT by ExpatGator (I hate Illinois Nazis!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: ExpatGator; NVDave; All

Well, when I got the gun there was some very fine rust on the end of the barrel.

I was able to get that off, and the surface (even under magnification) was still extremely smooth. But the color was off.

So I figured I’d try it. And I concentrated on the barrel.

Four passes of the Perma-Blue.
In between each application, I wiped it down good with a clean rag and isopropyl.

After the final app and wiping it down, used some mil supp gun oil.

The results are quite good!! Except now the barrel is the best looking part!

;-(

Patience, patience...

Thanks to all for their suggestions/ideas!


37 posted on 10/23/2010 7:36:27 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: yarddog

I apply Gunkote, Duracote and am a certified applier of CeraKote. I find Gun Kote and Durakote to be much easier scratched than a properly applied bluing. CeraKote is more durable than the other 2 sprayon coatings.


38 posted on 10/23/2010 7:40:05 PM PDT by ExpatGator (I hate Illinois Nazis!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: ExpatGator

I have not used any of the spray-on finishes tho I have read that some of them are really great. I noticed Brownell’s claims Gun-Kote is more durable than bluing.

The most beautiful bluing I have ever seen was on a very early Astra 400. It actually was blue, not black as most bluing jobs are. Very close was a model 98-09 Argentine Mauser made by DWM. I got it unfired from Walter Craig in Selma, Alabama. The workmanship was better than most custom guns. Considering those guns were made in the hundreds of thousands or even millions that is pretty impressive.


39 posted on 10/23/2010 7:50:49 PM PDT by yarddog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: djf

It’s been a few years since I’ve had a gun re-blued but I would think you could get it done for less than $200. On the other hand, if you want it to look like a $50 gun, do it yourself, if you want it to look like a $500 gun, get a professional finish.


40 posted on 10/23/2010 8:08:48 PM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: djf

There are several types of bluing. I’ll give a brief overview.

Rust bluing is the oldest type of bluing around. Using a bluing solution to rust the outer surface of the metal, the technique requires hot water, bluing solution, and time. Basically, you dip the part, let it rust for a bit, brush it, repeat a few times. See Cold blue below...

Belgian bluing is similar to rust bluing but is quicker and doesn’t rust the metal as much.

Fire bluing is considered the most stunning and beautiful finish you’ll ever see on a gun. There are two techiques for fire bluing, one that involves dipping and one that does not.

Hot blue is a couple of different techniques. One “table top” version is simply a hot acid bath dip that blues the metal. Another is again, a hot acid bath dip that is part of a multi step process, you dip, then dip to get tone.

What you are doing is cold blue. Few people do cold blue correctly and most companies that make cold bluing solutions really don’t explain what has to be done well. Most of the time they promote the product as a touch up.

When you cold blue a gun, depending on the solution you are using, you’ll put 1 part solution to X part of pure, clean filtered water. Tap water will not work. You dip the gun in and let it sit for approximately 3 minutes. pull it out and let the gun hang in the air. A thin film of surface rust will appear. The time it takes is totally dependant on the solution you use. If it’s uneven or splotchy, you’ve got contaminates on the gun or in the solution. If it’s pretty even, the wipe it off with a clean dry rag. you’ll see a faint darker color under the rust. Make sure you get all the rust off and I mean all the rust. Then repeat the process. You’ll keep doing this over and over until you get the desired depth and color. Note, if you want a nice glossy reflective finish, metal preperation is a must. you need to have a nice polished piece to get that finish.

I usually farm my bluing out here. We parkerize on site as it’s an easier and more resilant finish. Parkerizing also works quite well with hard water.

If you’re using perma blue, be aware that cold blue is tedious and slow. The finish is usually as you say so-so. You can make it look REAL nice but it’ll take you a few tries. The biggest thing to do before applying the bluing solution is to rinse the gun and parts in acetone to remove all traces of oils and dirt.

Hope this helps some.


41 posted on 10/23/2010 8:12:37 PM PDT by BCR #226 (07/02 SOT www.extremefirepower.com...The BS stops when the hammer drops.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BCR #226

Thanks!

I have a quart of acetone up on a shelf, but unless I can use it outside, I don’t open it in the house... me and acetone don’t mix!
So I settled on the isopropanol and it seemed to work pretty good. I could see a little bit of dark color the first time I wiped it down, but the second and third wiping came out clean.

It’ll never be factory, and I’m not aiming to sell it, just trying things out. I mean I don’t want it to rust anymore, and it’s nice if it looks good. So that’s ok.


42 posted on 10/23/2010 8:19:25 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: yarddog
I just looked it up and one finish which you simply spray on and bake in an oven is Brownells’ Gun-Kote.

I concur. It's actually made by KG Industries. It's incredibly tuff stuff. I refinished my CZ 82 with it and couldn't be happier. I used the matte black color.


43 posted on 10/23/2010 8:23:14 PM PDT by 50cal Smokepole (Effective gun control involves effective recoil management)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: yarddog

The work done by factories 100 years ago is incredible. We are pikers compared to them.


44 posted on 10/23/2010 8:27:29 PM PDT by ExpatGator (I hate Illinois Nazis!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: All

BTW, Washington Arms Collector show at Puyallup fairgrounds in Puyallup, Washington today and tomorrow.

Hundreds of tables. It was far and away the most packed time I have ever seen at the show.

Anyone can enter, but you must be a member to be able to purchase firearms, and to be a member, you have to either be active military, be in possession of a current CCP, or pass the NICS check.

Gun prices seem to be going up a bit, but there was quite a large selection of pretty decent weapons in the 300-700 dollar range.

Just an FYI for Washington state FReepers!


45 posted on 10/23/2010 8:29:28 PM PDT by djf (OK, so you got milk. Got Tula???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: dangerdoc

Yeah, I would do it for $125. Hot blued.


46 posted on 10/23/2010 8:30:39 PM PDT by ExpatGator (I hate Illinois Nazis!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: ExpatGator
What process is ‘Colt Royal” blue, if you know. Does re-blueing necessarily destroy collector value?
47 posted on 10/23/2010 8:42:49 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: ExpatGator

I am constantly impressed at the tolerances they held on manual machines, even in full-tilt-boogie wartime production environments.


48 posted on 10/23/2010 9:01:13 PM PDT by NVDave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: 50cal Smokepole

You did a good job. That CZ looks like a factory finish. I have read that cerra-coat is even better but is more difficult to apply.

I have actually just used spray paint for older less expensive guns in which I had to remove rust before finishing. The paint scratches easily but is also easy to retouch. Krylon seems to be a good one.


49 posted on 10/23/2010 9:04:11 PM PDT by yarddog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: djf

Bump for Blueing reference.


50 posted on 10/23/2010 9:15:03 PM PDT by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin (Freedom is the freedom to discipline yourself so others don't have to do it for you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-61 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson