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High cholesterol in Women found to be the reverse of what they thought it was (less risky)
PubMed ^ | Sept 25, 2011

Posted on 10/26/2011 3:59:36 AM PDT by Scythian

Some studies indicate that the predictive properties of cholesterol might not be as straightforward as widely assumed. Our aim was to document the strength and validity of total cholesterol as a risk factor for mortality in a well-defined, general Norwegian population without known CVD at baseline. Methods  We assessed the association of total serum cholesterol with total mortality, as well as mortality from CVD and ischaemic heart disease (IHD), using Cox proportional hazard models. The study population comprises 52 087 Norwegians, aged 20-74, who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995-1997) and were followed-up on cause-specific mortality for 10 years (510 297 person-years in total).

Results  Among women, cholesterol had an inverse association with all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 0.94; 95% confidence interval.

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology looked at 52,087 individuals between the ages of 20 and 74. After adjusting for factors like age, smoking and blood pressure, researchers found women with high cholesterol (more than 270 mg/dl) had a 28 percent lower mortality risk than women with low cholesterol (under 193 mg/dl). Risk for heart disease, cardiac arrest and stroke also declined as cholesterol levels rose.

Two words people : Magnesium and Pottasium, those are what your body has a deficiency of, not statins IMHO (and what the evidence shows) ...


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: cholesterol; women

1 posted on 10/26/2011 3:59:44 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: Scythian

Wow. After my doc telling me for two years to start, I just this week started on very low dose of statin. Female. sixties. confused.


2 posted on 10/26/2011 5:15:48 AM PDT by Mercat
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To: Mercat
Beware of statins. Research everything. Two of my dear friends have been told recently that their mothers have Alzheimer's because they've been on lipitor for 10 years or more.

When my father died of an aortic aneurysm we were told that it's possible his statin drug over-stripped his blood vessels.

The Alzheimer's theory makes sense. Cholesterol is necessary for brain health.

3 posted on 10/26/2011 5:30:24 AM PDT by LoveUSA (You don't notice the night light until it gets dark.)
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To: Scythian

Also, higher, rather than lower, levels of cholesterol in people over 80 is beneficial, not harmful, probably because they have a greater need of it to maintain cellular membrane structure since cell turnover and repair is decreased in the elderly.


4 posted on 10/26/2011 5:39:06 AM PDT by aruanan
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To: LoveUSA

Statins rip CoQ10 out of your body, very important for the heart. I am not a doctor, but I cannot stress enough how important Magnesium and Potassium are to the human heart, they reduce blood pressure, suppress diabetes, relax the veins, just so much good there. As long as you don’t have any kidney issues work things with Mag and Pottasium into your diet. Remember, always work with your doctor.


5 posted on 10/26/2011 5:52:43 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: Scythian

Everybody sing:
~~Killing me softly with statins~~killing me softly~~with statins~~killing me softly~~

(I won’t touch the stuff)


6 posted on 10/26/2011 6:06:27 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Agenda21: Dept. of Life, Dept. of Liberty and the Dept. of Happiness)
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To: Apple Blossom

ping


7 posted on 10/26/2011 6:15:56 AM PDT by bmwcyle (Obama is a Communist, a Muslim, and an illegal alien)
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To: bmwcyle

bump


8 posted on 10/26/2011 6:22:14 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: Scythian

I strongly recommend Gary Taubes’ incredible book, “Good Calories, Bad Calories,” which contains more actual scientific references than most papers in a medical journal. It is dense, no doubt. But he has said this for years. His newer book, “Why We Get Fat-—and What to Do About It,” is more accessible, but has far less meat (pardon the pun).


9 posted on 10/26/2011 6:26:43 AM PDT by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
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To: Scythian

bump


10 posted on 10/26/2011 6:33:56 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: LS

>I strongly recommend Gary Taubes’ incredible book, “Good Calories, Bad Calories,” which contains more actual scientific references than most papers in a medical journal.<

In addition to Gary’s book, another very enlightening book is William Davis, MD’s book “Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health”.


11 posted on 10/26/2011 6:59:48 AM PDT by Darnright ("I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca)
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To: Scythian; decimon; neverdem

Ping


12 posted on 10/26/2011 7:43:14 AM PDT by Silentgypsy (If this creature is not stopped it could make its way to Novosibirsk!)
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To: neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers; Ladysmith; Roos_Girl; Silentgypsy; conservative cat; ...

Thanks, Gypsy.

Ping


13 posted on 10/26/2011 7:55:51 AM PDT by decimon
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To: Silentgypsy

bump


14 posted on 10/26/2011 8:10:04 AM PDT by Scythian
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To: Scythian

What about men, or do we just not care about evil white men?


15 posted on 10/26/2011 8:10:44 AM PDT by Conservativegreatgrandma
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To: Scythian
This kind of turnabout shows the problem with one-off studies that conclude things like “too much X increase the risk of you dying by Y.” They are too narrow. Biology is not that simple. Yeah, something like cholesterol might make you more likely to have a heart issue but int probably make you LESS likely to have a host of other issues. It is not a 1 dimensional trade-off.
16 posted on 10/26/2011 9:17:40 AM PDT by TalonDJ
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To: Scythian

What about men with higher cholesterol? It would seem as though what’s sauce for the goose would be sauce for the gander.


17 posted on 10/26/2011 10:55:29 AM PDT by little jeremiah (We will have to go through hell to get out of hell.)
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To: libertarian27
(I won’t touch the stuff)

Me either. I wound up in emergency. It was hitting my kidneys really hard. I can't take any of the statins.

18 posted on 10/26/2011 11:02:34 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: libertarian27

As an addendum, my mother couldn’t take them either, but for her, they messed up her liver.


19 posted on 10/26/2011 11:04:08 AM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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To: Netizen
I was taking niacin for cholesterol but it increased the enzyme levels of my liver, so the doctor took me off ..

I have always had good levels before....and I don't drink....so that's why she immediately had me drop the niacin..

I Googled this and it seems it happens quite often....certain supplements....even 'natural' types from health food stores, should be monitored.

20 posted on 10/26/2011 4:56:41 PM PDT by Guenevere (....We press on.....)
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To: Netizen
I was taking niacin for cholesterol but it increased the enzyme levels of my liver, so the doctor took me off ..

I have always had good levels before....and I don't drink....so that's why she immediately had me drop the niacin..

I Googled this and it seems it happens quite often....certain supplements....even 'natural' types from health food stores, should be monitored.

21 posted on 10/26/2011 4:56:57 PM PDT by Guenevere (....We press on.....)
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To: Netizen
I was taking niacin for cholesterol but it increased the enzyme levels of my liver, so the doctor took me off ..

I have always had good levels before....and I don't drink....so that's why she immediately had me drop the niacin..

I Googled this and it seems it happens quite often....certain supplements....even 'natural' types from health food stores, should be monitored.

22 posted on 10/26/2011 4:57:01 PM PDT by Guenevere (....We press on.....)
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To: Guenevere

Ooops....ooops...ooops


23 posted on 10/26/2011 4:57:33 PM PDT by Guenevere (....We press on.....)
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To: Silentgypsy; decimon; Scythian
PubMed is an online archive of Medline from the National Library of Medicine, IMHO. Medline originally went to medical libraries as compact disks in the mail with monthly updates in the early 1990s before it went online as PubMed.

The source is the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. The title of the citation is Is the use of cholesterol in mortality risk algorithms in clinical guidelines valid? Ten years prospective data from the Norwegian HUNT 2 study.

The complete abstract is:

Rationale, aims and objectives  Many clinical guidelines for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention contain risk estimation charts/calculators. These have shown a tendency to overestimate risk, which indicates that there might be theoretical flaws in the algorithms. Total cholesterol is a frequently used variable in the risk estimates. Some studies indicate that the predictive properties of cholesterol might not be as straightforward as widely assumed. Our aim was to document the strength and validity of total cholesterol as a risk factor for mortality in a well-defined, general Norwegian population without known CVD at baseline. Methods  We assessed the association of total serum cholesterol with total mortality, as well as mortality from CVD and ischaemic heart disease (IHD), using Cox proportional hazard models. The study population comprises 52 087 Norwegians, aged 20-74, who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995-1997) and were followed-up on cause-specific mortality for 10 years (510 297 person-years in total). Results  Among women, cholesterol had an inverse association with all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89-0.99 per 1.0 mmol L(-1) increase] as well as CVD mortality (HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.88-1.07). The association with IHD mortality (HR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.92-1.24) was not linear but seemed to follow a 'U-shaped' curve, with the highest mortality <5.0 and ≥7.0 mmol L(-1) . Among men, the association of cholesterol with mortality from CVD (HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.98-1.15) and in total (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1.03) followed a 'U-shaped' pattern. Conclusion  Our study provides an updated epidemiological indication of possible errors in the CVD risk algorithms of many clinical guidelines. If our findings are generalizable, clinical and public health recommendations regarding the 'dangers' of cholesterol should be revised. This is especially true for women, for whom moderately elevated cholesterol (by current standards) may prove to be not only harmless but even beneficial.

Total cholesterol was never that great as a predictor of cardiovascular risk or all cause mortality.

http://www.pitt.edu/~super1/lecture/lec5331/004.htm

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In the Framingham Heart Study, as many as one third of all coronary heart disease (CHD) events occurred in individuals with total cholesterol <200 mg/dL. Considering that the average U.S. cholesterol level is approximately 210 to 220 mg/dL, almost half of all heart attack events and all stroke events that will occur in the United States next year will in fact occur among individuals with below-average lipid levels. For this reason, our research group has sought in our large-scale prospective epidemiologic studies to understand better other markers associated with cardiovascular risk.

Reference:
Castelli WP. Lipids, risk factors and ischaemic heart disease. Atherosclerosis 1996;124(Suppl):S1-9.
Website


24 posted on 10/26/2011 10:59:39 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: Silentgypsy; decimon; Scythian

http://www.pitt.edu/~super1/lecture/lec5331/004.htm

If the graph doesn't print, you can find it at that URL.

As far as the comments abouut statins go, they have been shown in multiple double blind, placebo controlled studies to reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality at various LDL cholesterol levels. They also reduce a biomarker for inflammation, C-reactive protein.

25 posted on 10/26/2011 11:14:42 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: Mercat

Norway has a mixed Norse and Sa’ami population. The Sa’ami have livers that deal quite differently with high intake of cholesterol. Without more studies with different populations I wouldn’t trust this one.


26 posted on 10/27/2011 5:40:57 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: neverdem
See that area on the graph WAY TO THE LEFT?

down there about 100 or less ~ that's mine. It's hereditary.

I think I could survive on nothing but whale meat.

27 posted on 10/27/2011 5:44:06 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Guenevere

Yeah I can’t take niacin either.


28 posted on 10/27/2011 12:36:39 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come. Who's pilfering your wallet?)
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