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Ethernet splitter gigabit to computer 100mbit to phone

Posted on 02/22/2012 11:22:12 AM PST by John1111

I have googled and amazoned and I can't find a solution or product for this. Free Republic always comes through for me in answering these type of questions, so here it is. Using an existing Cat5e cable in the wall to each desktop, is there a splitter or inexpensive device that will provide 1-gigabit to the computer and then 100mbit to a VOIP phone off of that single Cat5e in the wall? The original plan was for the phone to provide the VOIP and data to the desktop computer, as the phone has two RJ45 ports on it. And oh, the phone needs to be supplied POE by the Cat5e feed coming into it from the network switch. Therefore, with this said, is there such a splitter or inexpensive device to do this? In other words, I need the 1gibabit speed to the desktop computer and 100mbit to the VOIP phone, but somehow, it would have to utilize that single Cat5e run that is in the wall.


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
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1 posted on 02/22/2012 11:22:14 AM PST by John1111
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To: John1111

Managed router.


2 posted on 02/22/2012 11:26:03 AM PST by apoxonu
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To: John1111

Reverse the polarity.


3 posted on 02/22/2012 11:29:07 AM PST by PetroniusMaximus
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To: John1111

Assuming that you have a 1 gb network, you will have to share bandwidth. Frankly, your VOIP phone probably needs kilobytes, not megabits, to function well. Relibility (qos) is more important. I think you would have to go with a low end desktop switch with qos on it, but also on the switch feeding your line on the other end.


4 posted on 02/22/2012 11:31:18 AM PST by Dr. Sivana (May Mitt Romney be the Paul Tsongas of 2012.)
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To: John1111

wouldn’t it be easier and cheeper to get a voip cable modem? then any base station powered off the modem can supply phone for the whole house.


5 posted on 02/22/2012 11:31:45 AM PST by waynesa98
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To: John1111

Only one way I can see to do this:

Put a GB switch between the wall and both devices, give up the existing POE, and get a power supply for each phone.

There are power bricks that supply POE for one device.


6 posted on 02/22/2012 11:32:09 AM PST by NRPM (We have to come to terms with the fact that governments have made promises they will not keep.)
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To: John1111
If I understand your configuration correctly, a $20 4-port hub will do the trick.
7 posted on 02/22/2012 11:32:44 AM PST by The_Victor (If all I want is a warm feeling, I should just wet my pants.)
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To: John1111

You’d need a managed ethernet switch.

The plug out of the wall connects to the phone, the ‘uplink’ port on the phone connects to the pc... the PC & the phone each have an IP address... in the switch, you’d allocate bandwidth to each device by IP address on the physical port the wire connects to.


8 posted on 02/22/2012 11:35:37 AM PST by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: John1111
This is what I use - it will automatically down select to 10 or 100mb if the device is not 1gb ready.

GS-2205 5-Port 10/100/1000 Desktop Switch
9 posted on 02/22/2012 11:43:32 AM PST by Cheerio (Barry Hussein Soetoro-0bama=The Complete Destruction of American Capitalism)
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To: NRPM

Use a Cisco SG200-08P gigabit 8 port switch. Not too expensive, nice management interface (remember to save your config changes), esaily established QoS for call prioritization and ports 1 through 4 are 48 volt PoE ports. Easy peasy.


10 posted on 02/22/2012 11:46:41 AM PST by Noumenon ("I tell you, gentlemen, we have a problem on our hands." Col. Nicholson-The Bridge on the River Qwai)
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To: John1111

Something like this might work. The uplink port will provide 1 gig to the access switch while the regular ports will autonegotiate whatever speed the computer/phone are using. At full duplex on the uplink you should have an effective 2G speed.
http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/TRENDNET-TEG-S5G-/831-2390


11 posted on 02/22/2012 11:48:34 AM PST by Mr Ramsbotham (Laws against sodomy are honored in the breech.)
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To: John1111

Thaw the chicken!


12 posted on 02/22/2012 11:48:45 AM PST by Redleg Duke ("Madison, Wisconsin is 30 square miles surrounded by reality.", L. S. Dryfus)
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To: John1111
Are you REALLY using gigabit rates anywhere in your network?

Unless you are at an office where things like CAT scans are transferred by network, or nuclear simulations, you probably aren't. And if you are at an office, let your IT staff handle it.

Just because you have a gigbit interface card in your desktop does NOT mean you are getting that much traffic. In fact, if you have DSL or cable, a 10Mbit interface is more than adequate.

/johnny

13 posted on 02/22/2012 11:56:46 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: John1111

I would not usa a hub. Get a switch. You can get them practically any place even Wal-Mart.


14 posted on 02/22/2012 11:57:41 AM PST by democratsaremyenemy
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To: John1111

I would not usa a hub. Get a switch. You can get them practically any place even Wal-Mart.


15 posted on 02/22/2012 11:57:54 AM PST by democratsaremyenemy
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To: John1111

I would not usa a hub. Get a switch. You can get them practically any place even Wal-Mart.


16 posted on 02/22/2012 11:58:07 AM PST by democratsaremyenemy
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To: John1111

buy a hub/switch that is auto sensing


17 posted on 02/22/2012 11:59:56 AM PST by coolbreeze (giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teen-age boys.)
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To: Cheerio

Thank you and everyone for replying and the ideas that you’ve given to me. Now, the argument that I’m getting from someone is it really worth the effort to get everyone to 1gigabit speed on their desktop computers? About a quarter of the computers at that location are running 100mbit NICs and I had planned on dropping gigabit NICs into the remaining computers with this whole idea. How can I state my case to the higher up that “yes, it is worth the expense and effort to get everyone to 1 gigabit speed on their comptuers” I ask this, because the VOIP phones will provide only 100mbit to the desktop computers.


18 posted on 02/22/2012 12:21:46 PM PST by John1111
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To: John1111
Do you really have 1 GB needs? That is a lot of data flow.

waynesa98 recommended VOIP cable modem. That would introduce network reliability issues for your phone system. When any node in the series of nodes you connect through to central office goes down, every node after that one goes down. i.e., your VOIP is also down.

19 posted on 02/22/2012 12:22:03 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: John1111

Just get a cheap switch from monoprice. I Always try monoprice first.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10521&cs_id=1052104&p_id=7857&seq=1&format=2

I’m no expert but you don’t want a hub. A switch is smarter and directs traffic to a specific device.

Your router probably has a 4 port switch already. Usually you can stack them 2 deep.

You set the QOS at the router.

I run one cable from my router switch to the AV area then have a switch for the PS3 and the TV. Another from the router switch to the next room for my PC’s and printer.

Two router connections / 5 devices.

Switches are usually very simple plug and go affairs.


20 posted on 02/22/2012 12:40:25 PM PST by ImJustAnotherOkie (zerogottago)
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To: John1111
Size your network to the incoming speed, unless you have massive traffic on internal networks. Do you have fiber into your business?

Unless you are in a medical, space, or physics field, it's unlikely that you need anything more than 100 MBit.

And why isn't your IT department handling this?

/johnny

21 posted on 02/22/2012 12:43:30 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: jwsea55

We have been assuming you only have one RJ45 port at each station.

We did a network upgrade with a phone system a few months ago. We found it cheaper to through an inexpensive switch in at a number of stations that adding additional ports and cabling. Adding an inexpensive switch would solve your problem of the 1gigabit through 100megbit limitation.


22 posted on 02/22/2012 12:43:53 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: John1111
You are SOL.

You'll be auto-sensing to 100mb and the computer will have to plug into the phone.

That said, you really don't need more than 100mb to the desktop. Lot's of studies have been done on this. Absent an EXTRAORDINARILY POWERFUL desktop doing extraordinarily unusual things, you'll likely never notice the difference.

A dedicated 100meg pipe is a BUNCH of bandwidth.

23 posted on 02/22/2012 12:44:46 PM PST by Mariner (War Criminal #18)
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To: John1111

I’m inclined to agree that most people don’t need gigabit at their desktop, unless you’re moving multi-GB files around every day. The 100mb would be easy since your phones already have an internal 100mb switch.

Also, note that only two of the responses actually took into account the POE requirement you mentioned!

But if you really have to have Gb, then the Cisco POE switch mentioned above would do the trick. Then again, if you’re going to spend $150/computer to do this, you could probably have a second cable pulled, and the the phone and computer would each have their own connection.


24 posted on 02/22/2012 12:54:27 PM PST by NRPM (We have to come to terms with the fact that governments have made promises they will not keep.)
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To: John1111

You need a PoE Switch. PoE means the ethernet line has power on it. Most switches dont do that because computers don’t need it. Most phones, however, get their power from their signal line so they need it. This is something more than just a gigabit 10/100/1000 ethernet switch so don’t just go buy one from walmart. But that is also less than a managed ethernet switch so don’t go waste your money on one of those. Go to amazon, put in ‘poe switch’ and look for one that has gigabit (or it might say 10/100/1000). ALternately you could get any old cheap gigabit switch and also get a device which inject power into the ethernet line. That is probably the cheaper route. If you search amazon for PoE switch some devices like that will be in the list.


25 posted on 02/22/2012 12:57:11 PM PST by TalonDJ
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To: John1111

Get a cheap 4 port gige switch at best buy. Netgear is good.


26 posted on 02/22/2012 1:03:01 PM PST by stuartcr ("In this election year of 12, how deep into their closets will we delve?")
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To: jwsea55
We did a network upgrade with a phone system a few months ago. We found it cheaper to through an inexpensive switch in at a number of stations that adding additional ports and cabling. Adding an inexpensive switch would solve your problem of the 1gigabit through 100megbit limitation.

Should read

We found it cheaper to throw in an inexpensive switch in at a number of stations than adding additional ports and cabling.

sorry

27 posted on 02/22/2012 1:05:44 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: John1111

Most VOIP phones have a built-in switch, but it is often 100Base-T. This is not a problem for most people in a home network, as they are not often transferring huge files over the network to other computers at home.

If you really need to have Gigabit to your computer, buy a $30 Gigabit switch and plug both the computer and phone into it, and plug a patch cable from the wall into it.


28 posted on 02/22/2012 1:08:59 PM PST by B Knotts (Just another Tenther)
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To: John1111

“yes, it is worth the expense and effort to get everyone to 1 gigabit speed on their comptuers”

This is most likely not an accurate statement, i.e. there is almost certainly no requirement for 1 Gbps on their computers. People do not take kindly to being over-sold solutions which provide no improvement in service -this is your risk here.

Seriously, any company conducting reputable computing operations at 1 Gbps will not have a network technician who does not know what a switch is. I will therefore assume your company does not have OC3 connectivity or clients requiring throughput above 100 Mbps. Ergo don’t waste time and money on end user equipment for which there is no provider equipment or end user requirement.

As others have stated an inexpensive switch and VoIP power supplies will work. If you don’t want to buy the VoIP PSs then you’re shelling out a grand or more for a POE switch.


29 posted on 02/22/2012 1:10:46 PM PST by Justa
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To: TalonDJ

Chances are his phone has a separate power supply, but if not, then yes, he’d have to get a PoE switch. I’d be very surprised if his phone didn’t come with a power supply, though.


30 posted on 02/22/2012 1:10:55 PM PST by B Knotts (Just another Tenther)
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To: John1111

If you’ve already got enterprise-class switching infrastructure you likely already have POE, QOS and 1 Gb speed to each network drop. If that is all true, simply specify handsets that will pass 1 Gb to the desktop. VOIP phones have two ethernet connectors - one for link to the network (the “goes-inta”) and the other for connection to the local workstation (the “goes-outa”). Gig phones will pass 1 Gb to the workstation. They’re more expensive but if you want Gb speed, don’t let the phone implementation create bottlenecks at each desktop. A number of suggestions advocating the use of a small, 4 port gig switch at the desktop are cost effective. Not certain but that may have an impact on the ability of QOS since the 4 port switch appears as a single collision-domain to the infrastructure port. Your throughput would likely suffer but, more importantly, the QOS function might be foiled. QOS can prioritize voice over data and POE will power the handset. Something to consider if this scenario is true - if you have to have dial tone during a power outage, you’ll have to equip your switch racks with UPS backups.
Choice of VOIP vendor is not dependent upon the switch infrastructure. I’ve seen plenty of mixed environments that work flawlessly with, say, Cisco VOIP and Avaya/Nortel infrastructure. Good luck....


31 posted on 02/22/2012 1:12:26 PM PST by LakeEffectLad
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To: John1111

I missed the PoE part when I replied. Are you saying your phone did not come with a power supply? If so, yeah, you’ll need a Power over Ethernet switch...or...just order a power supply for your phone for $20-30.


32 posted on 02/22/2012 1:13:06 PM PST by B Knotts (Just another Tenther)
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To: John1111
At the risk of asking a really stupid question - what is your Cat 5 connecting to? Do you have a direct fiber optic line to your carrier that can carry 1 gig? I'm not expert, but if your company connects through other than a dedicated line, I don't see how you could even send 1 gig on your outbound line - and I assume you are connecting more than one computer, so a 1 gig connection to an individual computer strikes me as useless.

Experts, feel free to educate me ...

33 posted on 02/22/2012 1:26:45 PM PST by In Maryland ("Truth? We don't need no stinkin' truth!" - Official Motto of the Main Stream Media)
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To: In Maryland
At the risk of asking a really stupid question - what is your Cat 5 connecting to? Do you have a direct fiber optic line to your carrier that can carry 1 gig? I'm not expert, but if your company connects through other than a dedicated line, I don't see how you could even send 1 gig on your outbound line - and I assume you are connecting more than one computer, so a 1 gig connection to an individual computer strikes me as useless.

IMHO you are right on. The only reason I put in a gigabit switch and Cat 6 cable was to get a really speedy connection between two PCs and a NAS that are passing lots of data. I cannot ever get above 100Mb from my router and the ISP cable connection is limited to 20Mb (as I usually do I have probably mixed Mb and mb here)
34 posted on 02/22/2012 1:36:11 PM PST by Cheerio (Barry Hussein Soetoro-0bama=The Complete Destruction of American Capitalism)
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To: LakeEffectLad
As you mentioned about the QOS/switch issue and collisions, I was aware of this being a possible issue. The cable runs were substantially greater than $150 per station in our case (physical firewall issues in an old building). We tested it out for a week with no issues and determined a couple of switches cost effectively solved the problem.

With the exception of a couple of users, most data requests to the server were ridiculously below 100mb.

Like many, I have wondered what John1111 is running to the site. Fiber? And what is that they need 1gb at each station.

35 posted on 02/22/2012 3:40:13 PM PST by jwsea55
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To: jwsea55

The decision of 100Mb vs. 1 Gb is strictly budgetary in my opinion. Concurring with most of the posts here, the bandwidth is excessive by today’s standards so the decision is not necessarily one of a technical nature. However, if implementing new switch infrastrcuture AND considering a VOIP solution for the PBX requirements, I’d go to Gig now and assure a solid infrastructure for many moons to come. The last thing the finance guys are going to want hear in 5 years is the need for another infrastructure project to upgrade to Gig (the industry will eventually find a way to suck up the bandwidth that we today call excessive).

I do think the implementation of a station-side switch for this application would throw wrench into the works. At a minimum, POE will not pass through the station switch to my knowledge - so now you have to add a power supply to the phones OR add a POE injector behind the station switch. Additionally, and I’ve got a call out to my VOIP geek colleagues to confirm, the QOS function on the infratructure side will be compromised since you’ve now got two MAC addresses in the same collision domain - I could be wrong and will verify as time permits. If I’m not mistaken, it is the QOS function that seperates the MAC of the phone to a VLAN on which resides the voice-mail device, switch/router acquired for the VOIP equivalent of a PBX and phone administration machine(s).
Finally, and this is just anecdotal, seems like every time I drop a small 4 port switch on or under someone’s desk, some knucklehead will loop and ethernet cable and start a broadcast storm. Just one more part to troubleshoot (we’ve actually started filling empty switch ports with unterminated RJ-45 connectors - they’re removable for expansion unlike my proposal to fill them with epoxy).

If I hear back from one of the VOIP gurus with an answer on the QOS items I’ll put up another post.


36 posted on 02/23/2012 6:41:49 AM PST by LakeEffectLad
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To: Cheerio

In my opinion, the external connection to the internet is less important than fat pipes inside the premises. I’m not concerned that users can get to Facebook quickly. I am concerned that users can get to spindles in the server room quickly. If you start adding video for any reason (staff development, conference calling, etc.) in any sort of multi-cast or potential multi-cast situation, the bandwidth will get sucked up at some point down the road.
Most Gb gear today has the added dimension of creating an even faster backbone when necessary. Almost all the Avaya gear can accept a 10 Gb GBIC to provide huge pipes when needed. Also, if you’ve got any WAN needs on fiber, you can easily upgrade to 10Gb and start spreading your off-site backups and DR applications to another corner of the campus. I’m envisioning a complete data center running VM’s of all essential services at the “off-site”. When the off-site is in production, I don’t wawnt bandwidth limitations impacting my efforts or user productivity. As I said in another post - it is a financial decision. If you can rationalize it all, it is worth the trouble now to avoid another upgrade in 5 years. The industry will catch up to overly sized pipes that you implement today.


37 posted on 02/23/2012 7:41:35 AM PST by LakeEffectLad
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To: LakeEffectLad
I had most of your concerns going into upgrade and just haven't seen any problems. Our biggest issue was upload bandwidth since the client's only alternative was limited capacity DSL (that had line noise and distance issues from the CO).

I totally agree if building a new network to do 1gb capacity since the added cost at that point is not appreciable vs putting in old technology.

The biggest challenge is most of the businesses we handle are still under significant budget constraints, even a small incremental dollar amounts can stop solutions from moving forward and yet a solution has to be found. It is usually, "Can you find a cheaper alternative? We just can't afford that right now."

I find it incredibly rewarding to work with some of the business owners we work with. Most of these guys have had to put dollars into their businesses to make payroll at different and sometimes extended periods over the last few years. One guy put in $300k over six months to keep his employees going--knowing he was going to downsize his employees by 85% at the end of that period (Chinese outsourcing and two major clients postponed and reduced orders).

We should be doing a full conversion in the next few weeks. (Nice to have a job where the decision makers want it done right and have a budget.) I will spend 15 minutes with our Shoretel guy and ask him about his thoughts.

Do appreciate your thoughts.

38 posted on 02/23/2012 9:46:05 AM PST by jwsea55
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