Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Inside the internet: Google allows first ever look at the eight vast data centers
The Daily UK ^ | 17 October 2012 | Mark Prigg

Posted on 10/21/2012 5:35:35 PM PDT by jwsea55

* Data centres range from vast warehouses in Iowa to a converted paper mill in Finland
* Buildings are so large Google even provides bicycles for engineers to get around them
* Street View tour of North Carolina facility reveals Stormtrooper standing guard

Google has given a rare glimpse inside the vast data centres around the globe that power its services.

They reveal an intricate maze of computers that process Internet search requests, show YouTube video clips and distribute email for millions of people.

With hundreds of thousands of servers, colourful cables and even bicycles so engineers can get around quickly, they range from a converted paper mill in Finland to custom made server farms in Iowa.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet; Conspiracy
KEYWORDS: datacenters; google; googledatacenters; insidegoogle
Did a good job with this article. If you have never heard about a data center, the article is definitely worth the read.
1 posted on 10/21/2012 5:35:41 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

Google has done quite well in delivering information to ... everyone! Imagine a government doing something like this ...


2 posted on 10/21/2012 5:44:53 PM PDT by Ken522
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

This is my home town... Haven’t seen any storm troopers wandering around the site.. really impressive retaining wall that must be about 70 feet tall running around the south eastern side of the property that goes for about 1/4 mile


3 posted on 10/21/2012 5:45:05 PM PDT by contrarian (the street view is as close as you will come.. they have armed guards that prowl the property)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jim Robinson; John Robinson

Of interest? Enormous server farm pix at link.


4 posted on 10/21/2012 5:51:35 PM PDT by Albion Wilde (On Sesame Street, Obama is brought to you by the letter O and the number 16 billion. - Mitt Romney)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ken522
Google has done quite well in delivering information to ... everyone! Imagine a government doing something like this ...

Not just delivering info but also extremely good at collecting it and connecting the dots.

Their search/indexing/quering algorithms are incredible. God help those like FBers who post everything on themselves.

5 posted on 10/21/2012 5:52:43 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

I don’t do business with companies that practice anti-Second Amendment bigotry.


6 posted on 10/21/2012 5:52:52 PM PDT by Standing Wolf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

“The exterior of a Dulles, Oregon server farm”

Sloppy reporting. That should be The Dalles, Oregon.


7 posted on 10/21/2012 5:52:52 PM PDT by Ronald_Magnus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: contrarian

You are in Iowa?


8 posted on 10/21/2012 5:53:40 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

No Lenoir, N.C. article says street view of N.C. facility


9 posted on 10/21/2012 5:55:30 PM PDT by contrarian (the street view is as close as you will come.. they have armed guards that prowl the property)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Standing Wolf
I don’t do business with companies that practice anti-Second Amendment bigotry.

Google's alogrithms are pretty much leaps and bounds above anything out there, though.
Have you checked out Ixquick?

10 posted on 10/21/2012 5:56:37 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: contrarian

thanks.


11 posted on 10/21/2012 5:57:34 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
How things have changed. It used to be that computers were huge, filling up whole rooms. All the information that existed in digital form in the world could could fit on those.


12 posted on 10/21/2012 6:17:21 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vince Ferrer

What’s changed is not the huge rooms, it’s the computers. Once they were huge and there was one of them, now they’re small, PCs really and there are many, thousands of them. Progress? I don’t think so. I’d take one DEC Alpha, or say a five Alpha cluster over 100 PCs!


13 posted on 10/21/2012 6:25:35 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Vince Ferrer; Revolting cat!
It blows my mind at what people were doing back in the 60s with the available technology. Can't remember the memory/storage restrictions for the original ticket for what is now Cubic's Transportation system when it was first developed but it was ridiculously small. They eventually had to include security in this restricted constraint.

Now most of programming is just bloatware. Hardly an elegance or succinctness.

14 posted on 10/21/2012 6:37:10 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

Advertising where your datacenters are is not wise.


15 posted on 10/21/2012 6:52:21 PM PDT by SC_Pete
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vince Ferrer

Lol. First dadacenter I visited filled a vast hall in a large manufacturing plant, was so noisy that the had a giant concert band blaster they rolled around with the operators (8 feet tall) and had all of 16K memory :).


16 posted on 10/21/2012 7:03:10 PM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (I will fear no muslim))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
Google's alogrithms are pretty much leaps and bounds above anything out there, though.
Not true; Bing routinely beats Google in search relevance. They beat us sometimes too, but lately we've been beating them more.
17 posted on 10/21/2012 7:04:48 PM PDT by Scutter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
Now most of programming is just bloatware. Hardly an elegance or succinctness.

Precisely. I remember when I was learning perl. I had a mentor, whom I have since come to consider the best perl programmer I have ever met or known about. He used a word to describe some programming solutions, a description it took me a while to understand, but I have since applied it to other things, like... rock music and art photography. I've no idea if this word is common in the programming or perl or in engineering community in general. The word was (is) GASP! nothing more than "interesting"!

He'd describe my early efforts as "not interesting", and later solutions as "interesting". I never dared to ask him what he meant, but in time I learned to understand it on my own, and appreciate interesting things in programming.

18 posted on 10/21/2012 7:05:29 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: SC_Pete
Advertising where your datacenters are is not wise.

The problem is they are so hard to hide because of their power needs. If I recall correctly, these data centers consume 3% of the country's total power consumption (most it related to cooling...for every watt used to run a data center 2.5 is used to cool it). They like lots of cheap, plentiful and reliable power. (Hydro dominated power sources are preferred locations.) That limits site choices.

19 posted on 10/21/2012 7:06:53 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

For good or bad, porn drove the early internet technology.


20 posted on 10/21/2012 7:12:48 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
Advertising where your datacenters are is not wise.

Non-descript windowless grey buildings located next to railroad tracks, i.e. right-of-ways are your Internet data centers, every fool knows that.

21 posted on 10/21/2012 7:13:36 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Revolting cat!
Have you seen the coded that comes back from India? I have looked a few times at it and could only think, "that garbage was worth what you think you saved in dollars? what are you going to do when you need to do version X+1? spend twice as much?" Overall, pre-1995 US programmers produced pretty good code.

And our good friend Billy Gates, "all you will ever need is 256."

22 posted on 10/21/2012 7:15:48 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Ronald_Magnus

Oregon also has a town named Boring.


23 posted on 10/21/2012 7:18:09 PM PDT by steve86 (Acerbic by nature not nurture TM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Revolting cat!
Non-descript windowless grey buildings located next to railroad tracks, i.e. right-of-ways are your Internet data centers, every fool knows that.

Oooops, you gave away their one secret.

24 posted on 10/21/2012 7:18:30 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
It blows my mind at what people were doing back in the 60s with the available technology.

Yes, we went to the moon on this, One of NASA's IBM computers.

My comment is reflecting that the more we think we are doing new things in computers, we really have done something similar, and already worked out the bugs, previously.

A great article I read maybe 20 years ago was right on, and still is 20 years later. The author complained that everything in computers has to be invented three times. Take multitasking operating systems. Mainframes could do it in the 60s. Then people invented minicomputers, which could not multitask. But everyone hated the mainframes so they went to mini computers. But then, people complained because they couldn't multitask, so multitasking operating systems like UNIX had to be written for them. Then PCs were invented, and everyone hated mainframes, and mini computers, and wanted to work on PCs. But they didn't multitask, but that was ok. Then people started complaining, and so companies had to write multitasking PC operating systems. Each time it was the same thing over again, but people thought it was some great new discovery.

You can point out almost any area of computing and see the same thing. Granted, I love the extra speed and capacity of modern machines, but we still just keep reinventing the wheel and slapping on new buzzwords.

25 posted on 10/21/2012 7:37:29 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
Here's the link to the Wired article by Steven Levy.

If you've never read his book "Hackers" (nothing to do with the movie), it's really interesting!

26 posted on 10/21/2012 7:47:04 PM PDT by Slump Tester (What if I'm pregnant Teddy? Errr-ahh -Calm down Mary Jo, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vince Ferrer
Great add!

Does crack me up what people think is new. I was emailing in the 80s. I was "using" part of the ARPANET in the early 90's when it open to a more public domain purpose. It was pretty unfunctional, pretty archaic, command dependent, not much out there. ARPA was pretty functional once you were inside the government sponsored world.

It does make me laugh at what people thought was multitasking. "No, your processor is really just concentrating on another thread." At the same time, it is pretty amazing at how much processing capability is now in 3 cubic inches.

27 posted on 10/21/2012 8:00:14 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
Did Steve Jobs Steal The iPad? Genius Inventor Alan Kay Reveals All
28 posted on 10/21/2012 8:13:49 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Slump Tester
Great add! A bit long but definitely worth the read for those that want a more indepth view than the article.

From the article...For years Google didn’t share what it was up to. “Our core advantage really was a massive computer network, more massive than probably anyone else’s in the world,” says Jim Reese, who helped set up the company’s servers. “We realized that it might not be in our best interest to let our competitors know.”

Laughable since they want to share everybody elses personal data.

The one thing the article didn't cover was what Google is doing with/in hard drive(s) world. If I find something, I will post a link later.

Yes, Hackers needs to be added to my reading list.

Thanks again.

29 posted on 10/21/2012 8:53:19 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Vince Ferrer
>Did Steve Jobs Steal The iPad? Genius Inventor Alan Kay Reveals All

Thanks. I am familiar with the story.

I worked on a technology with the retired Xerox guy who was responsible for bringing Jobs and Waz into Parc. The Steves saw the first mouse based computer and eventually got to take it home with them. It took them awhile to understand it wasn't theirs. Funny how Isaacs book is slightly different story from the version I heard.

My friend was extremely complementary of Jobs and Waz: thought they were some of the brightest guys he ever met. Not a bad complement coming from someone (who if he was known publicly) would be considered one of the top technologists of the Twentieth Century.

He also brought some kid by the name of Billy Gates in for funding in the late 70's. His boss was too busy, though, and Xerox passed. I forget which company that was. There were other similar stories.

30 posted on 10/21/2012 9:08:53 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Scutter
>Google's alogrithms are pretty much leaps and bounds above anything out there, though.

Not true; Bing routinely beats Google in search relevance. They beat us sometimes too, but lately we've been beating them more.

I personally haven't found Bing is 'better' than Google in getting tough search results...and I support Bing because it is good to have the competition...but that is just my experience.

31 posted on 10/21/2012 9:30:58 PM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55
I personally haven't found Bing is 'better' than Google in getting tough search results...and I support Bing because it is good to have the competition...but that is just my experience.
No doubt. We're talking very minor differences here. Thanks for the support.
32 posted on 10/22/2012 12:32:27 AM PDT by Scutter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

Just 20 years ago, this would have been a science-fiction movie and people would leave the theatre thinking that this would never happen in our lifetimes.


33 posted on 10/22/2012 1:19:15 AM PDT by SamAdams76
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

“It blows my mind at what people were doing back in the 60s with the available technology. “

Well, for one thing, slide rules were used to design the equipment that took us to the moon.


34 posted on 10/22/2012 8:08:12 AM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Vote Republican in 2012 and only be called racist one more time!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: catnipman
Well, for one thing, slide rules were used to design the equipment that took us to the moon.

I kept my dad's. I figured if we didn't have an EMP it could always be useful for propping open a window or something. Beautiful little device.

35 posted on 10/22/2012 8:20:03 AM PDT by jwsea55
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: jwsea55

“I kept my dad’s. I figured if we didn’t have an EMP it could always be useful for propping open a window or something. Beautiful little device. “

I used a slide rule for all engineering and scientific calculations until my senior year as an undergraduate, when the first TI scientific calculator came out. Many years later, I tossed my slide rule during some cleanup purge, and of course I now wish I had kept it. The calculator eventually gave up the ghost too.


36 posted on 10/22/2012 11:34:14 AM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Vote Republican in 2012 and only be called racist one more time!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson