Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

New Technology to Enable 1PetaByte Optical Discs. -- Researchers Develop 1000TB Optical Discs
Xbitlabs ^ | 06/24/2013 07:42 PM | Anton Shilov

Posted on 06/25/2013 11:05:08 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Researchers Develop 1000TB Optical Discs

*********************************************

Image at web site

***********************************************

A research team at Swinburne University of Technology has overcome a fundamental law of optical science that could lead to faster and more energy-efficient optical computing. It would allow Petabyte storage on a single disc.

“The new technique produces a focal spot that is 1 ten thousandth of a human hair, enabling more data to be written to disc,” said Min Gu, director of the centre for micro-photonics at Swinburne.

The team – professor Gu, PhD student Zongsong Gan and Yaoyu Cao from the centre for micro-photonics, and professor Richard Evans from CSIRO – has developed a breakthrough technique that enables three-dimensional optical beam lithography at nine nanometres.

The technique overcomes a fundamental law discovered in 1873 by German scientist Ernst Abbe, who determined that a light beam focused by a lens cannot produce a focal spot smaller than half of the wavelength or 500nm for visible light. This law enabled the development of modern optical microscopy, an indispensable tool in physics, chemistry, material science and biological science. However, this fundamental law also set up a barrier for scientists to access small structures in the nanometre scale.

 “Optical beam lithography is the ultimate approach to 3D nanofabrication. However, the diffraction nature of light prevents us from achieving nanometre resolution in a single-beam optical beam lithography system,” said Mr. Gu.

Professor Gu said by using a second donut-shaped beam to inhibit the photopolymerisation triggered by the writing beam in the donut ring, two-beam optical beam lithography can break the limit defined by the diffraction spot size of the two focused beams. He said the key to 3D deep sub-diffraction optical beam lithography was the development with CSIRO of a unique two-photon absorption resin.

“This enabled a two-channel chemical reaction associated with the polymerisation and its counterpart of inhibited polymerisation, respectively, which eventually attributed to build mechanically robust nanostructures.  Thus, the development of the vertical integration of integrated circuits, leading to ultra-fast optical information signal processors, becomes possible in the near future,” explained Mr. Gu.

This is a goal of the centre for excellence for ultrahigh-bandwidth devices for optical systems, funded by the Australian research council.

 “Worldwide generated information doubles every two years. This breakthrough could lead to reduced cost and reduced energy consumption in data storage,” said the head of the research.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: hitech

1 posted on 06/25/2013 11:05:08 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; Still Thinking; ...

2 posted on 06/25/2013 11:09:07 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Peta is a thousand trillion? Washington Democrats thank you! They were worried that they’d be stuck at just hundreds of trillions of dollars.


3 posted on 06/25/2013 11:09:56 AM PDT by WilliamofCarmichael (If modern America's Man on Horseback is out there, Get on the damn horse already!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; Marine_Uncle; blam; ShadowAce; neverdem

How does lithography impact storage,...I maybe am missing simethib here.


4 posted on 06/25/2013 11:11:36 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Overcoming a fundamental law of physics

Sweet!

5 posted on 06/25/2013 11:17:59 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I remember when the CD ROM was the Holy Grail of optical storage.


6 posted on 06/25/2013 11:21:22 AM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ClearCase_guy

[[Overcoming a fundamental law of physics]]

Woohoo- perpetual motion machines in the near future-


7 posted on 06/25/2013 11:21:36 AM PDT by CottShop (Scientific belief does not constitute scientific evidence, nor does it convey scientific knowledge)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

That’ll store a lot of pr0n.


8 posted on 06/25/2013 11:22:03 AM PDT by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

the development with CSIRO of a unique two-photon absorption resin.


I wondered if the article would get to that. It’s the same principle used by the device that was used to transport me to this assignment from my home world. The return trip is slower - at least the part to the transmitter on the dark side of the moon.


9 posted on 06/25/2013 11:23:14 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
But why bother?

'640K of memory should be enough for anybody.'

NOTE: although often attributed to Bill Gates, apparently he never actually said this.

10 posted on 06/25/2013 11:25:57 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WilliamofCarmichael
The sequence is actually 1024 times....

Binary system so we have ....2, 4. 8, 16,32, 64, 128, 256, 512. 1024.

Now for the words,...we have Megabyte, Gigabyte, Terabyte, Petabyte, Exabyte, Zetabyte....etc

11 posted on 06/25/2013 11:26:33 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: cuban leaf

Next some lab will overturn the speed of light as the ultimate speed.


12 posted on 06/25/2013 11:29:53 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

I can put everything in the numerous boxes of burned discs on one eventually.


13 posted on 06/25/2013 11:29:54 AM PDT by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

So, OK, when do those 4T drives at Best Buy start coming down in price? And when can I get my entire personal collection of digital stuff on a single disk, which I can then lose in my couch or otherwise misplace?

Or better yet, when will MS come out with its first multi-Terabyte OS, based on the principle that all available storage space, no matter how large, are belong to them?


14 posted on 06/25/2013 11:32:00 AM PDT by Springfield Reformer (Winston Churchill: No Peace Till Victory!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ClearCase_guy
But why bother?

'640K of memory should be enough for anybody.'

NOTE: although often attributed to Bill Gates, apparently he never actually said this.

Given the costs of memory at the time the statement was made, the whole idea of buying more than 640k was ludicrous.

An upgrade from 64k to 128k was extremely expensive in the early 1980s. While I don't recall the exact numbers, I'm fairly sure that such an upgrade would have easily cost hundreds of dollars.

15 posted on 06/25/2013 11:33:48 AM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Lithography is merely the art, or act, or writing. It’s got everything to do with storage. :)


16 posted on 06/25/2013 11:35:01 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
of writing.....
17 posted on 06/25/2013 11:35:49 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Springfield Reformer
You ask some tough questions....I am still working on understandding the Graphic that goes with the article...

says 3D Fabrication of Multilayer....

18 posted on 06/25/2013 11:36:03 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I thought someone had already done that. ;-)


19 posted on 06/25/2013 11:37:02 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Just think of all the data some $100K/yr floor sweeper at IRS Headquarters could carry around in his pocket...ready to sell to the highest bidder.


20 posted on 06/25/2013 11:38:05 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (The Civil Servants Are No Longer Servants...Or Civil.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
That’ll store a lot of pr0n.

"The Circus Pony, the Acrobat, and the Dwarf, Volume VII, Trip to Seaworld"

/johnny

21 posted on 06/25/2013 11:38:29 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Wonderful - except it will still take three weeks to write 1,000 TB to the disk. :)


22 posted on 06/25/2013 11:40:59 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves (CTRL-GALT-DELETE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ShadowAce
When I see the word Lithography I immediately associate it with the etching of computer chips.>{?I guss that could be memory chips.

But then the writer throws in CD discs....

Never seen the word Lithography used as the mechanism for writing data on a CD / DVD disc.

23 posted on 06/25/2013 11:41:50 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

If this happened I could start ripping blu rays!!!! :D


24 posted on 06/25/2013 11:43:52 AM PDT by erod (I'm a Chicagoan till Chicago ends...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

The downside is the disc is 10 miles wide.


25 posted on 06/25/2013 12:04:27 PM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
The new technique produces a focal spot that is 1 ten thousandth of a human hair

Think of the hair you could store with that!

26 posted on 06/25/2013 12:09:55 PM PDT by Brett66 (Where government advances, and it advances relentlessly , freedom is imperiled -Janice Rogers Brown)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Bob
An upgrade from 64k to 128k was extremely expensive in the early 1980s.

Heck, most folks were still in the 8 bit world back then (Apple II, Atari 800, Commodore VIC-20/64, a bunch of Z-80 CPM boxes like KayPro and Osborne).

I did check an 1983 gamer magazine from England:

RAM PACKS FOR YOUR VIC 20 HARDWARE

32K switchable to 3K, 16K, 24K + hi-res £69.95

16K switchable to 3K f44.95 8K £29.95 3K £19.95

4-slot motherboard £24.95. All slot directly into the back of your Vic 20.

ATARI 400 16K - £129.57 + VAT = £149

ATARI 400 48K - £172.17 +VAT«£198

ATARI 800 48K - £260.00 +VAT = £299

27 posted on 06/25/2013 12:11:49 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
RE: "How does lithography impact storage,...I maybe am missing simethib here."

Well since one will be able to make even smaller transistors, then now possible, this will lead to new levels of sub micron chip design. Photo lithography is among the early steps taken to draw the various levels of transistors and the interconnecting wiring on into the chemical coatings applied on the silicon substrate (wafer) in the case of making transistors.
Where then during after each "writing step" is taken, one performs the chemical processes to implant the silicon substrate with either p or n or other metals, to build up parts of the transistor, as well as the aluminum interconnect leads (wiring the logic blocks) per circuit design requirements.
During the many stages (steps), think many passes of first creating a image upon a photo resistive coating allowing the coating to change it's characteristics, say not be susceptible to dissolving away when a given type of acid is applied to the wafer surface. So one builds layers into the wafer substrate surface, So with this new reduction in the beam size, one can make smaller features. Smaller transitors equate to increased clock rates in Integrated Circuits, as well as increased size of RAM and ROM.
So companies will be able to manufacture more powerful transistor circuits. For example:
Say current fabrication techniques limit the total size one can build a RAM onto a CPU chip, to 10 megabyte.
Now one may be able to double the size of the RAM on the chip to be 20 megabytes. Henceforth, a 100 percent increase in "storage" capability on the chip.

I barely touch upon how one makes a integrated circuit. Just think smaller elements such as transistors being made on a given dice size of silicon, so that more logic and memory can be designed into the integrated circuit. And smaller size transistors mean increased clock rates, so the chips can run at greater speeds for a given heat generation.
It gets rather involved.

I hope my deliberate abbreviated explanation helps some sort of visualize the benefits of increased ability in Photo Lithography to create ever more complex IC's.

28 posted on 06/25/2013 12:19:29 PM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Galt level is not far away......)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana
Thanks for the trip down memory lane (sorry).

Yes, RAM really was that expensive as were hard drives. I remember getting my first hard drive for an IBM PC in the mid, possibly late, 1980s -- a full-height 5 1/4" drive. At the time, the 5 meg drive cost about $300 but I opted to spend the extra $200 to get the massive 10 megabyte drive. (And, in those days, the $200 difference was worth a lot more than it is today.)

29 posted on 06/25/2013 12:21:46 PM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Marine_Uncle
Looks like to me this could be a huge impavct on buildong chips without all of that super expensive ulv violtte and xray technology....

Who needs a 1000 times petabyte on a CD?

30 posted on 06/25/2013 12:23:53 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Marine_Uncle

be back ;ater/


31 posted on 06/25/2013 12:24:27 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Bob

A full height on a XT would have been mid-80s. By the time the late 80s came along, the ATs had 1/2 height 1.2MB high density diskettes and the PS/2 series sported 3 1/2” 720kb and 1.44 Mb drives. Heady times.

Was your 5MB MFM, RLL, ESDI, SCSI, or proprietary. (I am omitting the SLOW floppy port adapter version used on early Macs.) Yikes.


32 posted on 06/25/2013 12:24:49 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana

Oh, I thought your full-height was referring to the floppy drive. Full height 5 MB went away when the great mass market drive, the Seagate 225 (20 mb) hit the market, along with its 30 mb RLL cousin and 40mb business model (ST238?)


33 posted on 06/25/2013 12:27:08 PM PDT by Dr. Sivana (There's no salvation in politics.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
RE: "Who needs a 1000 times petabyte on a CD?"

One could rant out a number of negatives. I'll spare us.
As usual it is a two edged sword.
34 posted on 06/25/2013 12:39:23 PM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Galt level is not far away......)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Well, the speed of light has slowed down so...


35 posted on 06/25/2013 1:04:47 PM PDT by rdb3 (Be aware that when it hits the fan, it won't be evenly spread.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

An optical disc from the Animal Rights terrorists?


36 posted on 06/25/2013 1:32:16 PM PDT by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's Economiws In One Lesson ONLINE http://steshaw.org/econohttp://www.fee.org/library/det)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dr. Sivana
You're probably right on the timing being in the mid rather than late 1980s.

As I recall the 5 and 10 megabyte drives were both Seagates and were full-height drives. They could have been either MFM or RLL. (They definitely weren't ESDI or SCSI.) The acronym SASI comes to mind but I'm not so sure about that. The memory fades with time.

37 posted on 06/25/2013 1:41:45 PM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Marine_Uncle
Well my new keyboard hasn't reduced my typos...

Definitely old tired eyes....

38 posted on 06/25/2013 2:46:14 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Professor Gu said by using a second donut-shaped beam to inhibit the photopolymerisation triggered by the writing beam in the donut ring, two-beam optical beam lithography can break the limit defined by the diffraction spot size of the two focused beams. He said the key to 3D deep sub-diffraction optical beam lithography was the development with CSIRO of a unique two-photon absorption resin. “This enabled a two-channel chemical reaction associated with the polymerisation and its counterpart of inhibited polymerisation, respectively, which eventually attributed to build mechanically robust nanostructures.

Of course! Why didn't I think of that ...

39 posted on 06/25/2013 2:52:40 PM PDT by EternalVigilance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fred Nerks
Fred could you run over to this university and check out what the guys are talking about.

And if they are gonna form a company backed up with patents ,...I want to invest .....need a stock symbol.

40 posted on 06/25/2013 3:07:58 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Who needs a 1000 times petabyte on a CD?

Correction.......

****************

Or even .... a 1000 times terabyte on a CD ...sized disk.?

41 posted on 06/25/2013 3:13:39 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
... and check out what the guys are talking about.

glad you asked, I can't even understand the article.

42 posted on 06/25/2013 3:28:19 PM PDT by Fred Nerks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Yeah Ernie. I know what you mean. :)


43 posted on 06/25/2013 3:34:34 PM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Galt level is not far away......)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Fred Nerks

See post #28 by Marine_Uncle....I think that is more significant than how much data can be loaded onto a CD size disk.


44 posted on 06/25/2013 5:13:38 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I’m still trying to catch up with Petabyte :p


45 posted on 06/26/2013 8:47:40 AM PDT by Bikkuri (Molon Labe)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Wow! Thanks Ernest.


46 posted on 06/26/2013 4:16:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (McCain or Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: wally_bert

I can put everything in the numerous boxes of burned discs on one eventually.


Which would make it much easier to forget where you put the disk.. lose it... have it all stolen.. Broken.. and would take a an entire DVD to record as a directory what was on it..


47 posted on 09/05/2013 9:17:01 AM PDT by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to include some fully orbed hyperbole..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson