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What is Capital Gains ?
self | Februry 13, 2014 | knarf

Posted on 02/13/2014 4:06:57 AM PST by knarf

I recently posted some money I got from a gas well near me ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: capitalgains; tax; taxes
and when talking to the guy that does my taxes, he said because of my age (66), and the total (projected) annual income, I would be under a federal income guideline and owe no taxes.


After a short conversation with a neighbor, successful and younger, HE said I'd be subject to a 28% capital Gains tax, no matter what my income is.

I've looked and tried to figure it out, and frankly, I couldn't find anything specific to my situation ... so I turn to FReepers and ask ...

I'm in Pennsylvania, I'm 66 and my income (again, projected for 2014) will be less than 27K (SS and royalty)

Have at it FreepeRs ... and thanx

1 posted on 02/13/2014 4:06:57 AM PST by knarf
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To: knarf

It is money you should not be collecting because it is not fair


2 posted on 02/13/2014 4:09:01 AM PST by ronnie raygun (zippy the a##clown sez..............................)
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To: knarf

How was the money reported to the IRS? 1099? K-1?


3 posted on 02/13/2014 4:11:54 AM PST by abb
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To: knarf

It depends on the total yearly amount, if you get no other income and you fall under the poverty line, you ‘might’ have to pay no taxes.

I have an relative that lives off of such royalties and he pays the Feds over $10K in estimated taxes every quarter.

Take it as you will, your mileage might vary, etc.


4 posted on 02/13/2014 4:28:36 AM PST by The Working Man
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To: knarf

...When you sign your taxes it says To the best of your knowledge all the info is true so you will be ok until they audit you three years from now. Just pay pennies on the dollar then.


5 posted on 02/13/2014 4:32:26 AM PST by teeman8r (Armageddon won't be pretty, but it's not like it's the end of the world.)
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To: knarf

I did the same deal and made a good profit. I was about 70 then and, aside from attorney fees, I received all of the profit. There was no capital gains tax. Three years thereafter I spoke directly to IRS in DC. I owed no other taxes.


6 posted on 02/13/2014 4:35:51 AM PST by Rudder
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To: knarf

My tax advice is don’t take tax advice from a discussion forum


7 posted on 02/13/2014 4:38:30 AM PST by almcbean
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To: almcbean

got it ... thanx


8 posted on 02/13/2014 4:39:37 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true .. I have no proof .. but they're true.)
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To: knarf

A Capital Gain is a profit on a Capital Asset. Example: Your house, you paid 100K and sold it for 120K, the 20K is a capital gain.

So if you just made a profit off of a product from your Capital Asset it is just income and you only pay taxes on it if you made enough to have to pay taxes.


9 posted on 02/13/2014 4:42:54 AM PST by tiki
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To: knarf

Regardless of what is owed, you have to compete a tax form.

Fill out your tax form and you will have your answer.


10 posted on 02/13/2014 4:54:41 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: tiki

Royalty income from oil/gas production is considered to be ordinary income and subject to the taxes just like business profit, W-2 income, etc. Income made from the difference between purchase and sale of a capital investment is a gain on capital investment, thus a “ capital gain” and subject to the tax laws that are applicable.


11 posted on 02/13/2014 4:56:51 AM PST by rstrahan
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To: knarf

Royalty is considered income.


12 posted on 02/13/2014 5:08:58 AM PST by IMR 4350
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To: thackney
Yeah .. I know that much

I guess I was confused by the term "Capitsl Gains" when it all seems to come under the heading of "income"

So if I understand correctly, it is income tax

13 posted on 02/13/2014 5:32:05 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true .. I have no proof .. but they're true.)
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To: knarf

I believe so, but don’t take tax advice from keyboard jockeys from afar.

Our timber sales and lease bonus payments were treated as income. Just as any home business would be treated.


14 posted on 02/13/2014 5:37:11 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: knarf

Royalty Payments

Taxpayers/lessors may receive periodic payments for their share of the natural resource. These payments are commonly known as royalty payments. They must be based on natural resource production on a recurring or intermittent basis, per the terms of the lease.

The lessee should provide the taxpayer with a Form 1099-MISC reporting the payments as “Royalties” in Box 2. Most taxpayers report royalty payments received as royalty income on Schedule E.

more at:
http://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/Tips-on-Reporting-Natural-Resource-Income


15 posted on 02/13/2014 5:38:53 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: knarf

If you have some time and want to see where you stand go to

http://www.taxact.com

You can do your taxes for free up until you want to either print them out or file electronically, that’s when they ask you for your credit card info. Might take about an hour or so but your situation seems pretty simple and straight forward. They have a good help system, will ask questions step by step and give you a really good idea of where you stand, and they will do your state taxes as well.

I’m going by memory but I believe they ask about royalties from gas and oil exactly like what your question was.


16 posted on 02/13/2014 5:46:11 AM PST by Abathar (Proudly posting without reading the article carefully since 2004)
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To: knarf

Your tax preparer is right. Capital gains is just one source of income — if your total income (capital gains + other income) is such that you pay no taxes, you don’t pay taxes on the capital gains.

But if your “other income” is such that you pay no taxes, but your capital gains is very large, that would push you into total income bracket where you pay taxes, you will have to pay taxes on it.

E.g. if your other income is $10,000, but you got $100,000 in capital gains, you will most certainly have to pay capital gains taxes.

However the advice you get here are only things to think about, NOT to take it as gospel and act upon it, most certainly not taxes — telling the IRS that you followed some anonymous posters advice on FR will not be an excuse, especially these days. ;)

You might want to get TurboTax and fill it out and see what it tells you and check with another taxpreparer also.


17 posted on 02/13/2014 6:03:09 AM PST by Innovative ("Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." -- Vince Lombardi)
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To: knarf

It’s capital gains and passive income.

That is: you don’t punch a time card for your money.

28%...


18 posted on 02/13/2014 6:13:57 AM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: knarf
Definition of 'Capital Gain'

1. An increase in the value of a capital asset (investment or real estate) that gives it a higher worth than the purchase price. The gain is not realized until the asset is sold. A capital gain may be short term (one year or less) or long term (more than one year) and must be claimed on income taxes. A capital loss is incurred when there is a decrease in the capital asset value compared to an asset's purchase price.

2. Profit that results when the price of a security held by a mutual fund rises above its purchase price and the security is sold (realized gain). If the security continues to be held, the gain is unrealized. A capital loss would occur when the opposite takes place.

And

http://people.opposingviews.com/federal-income-taxation-oil-gas-royalties-9569.html

and when talking to the guy that does my taxes, he said because of my age (66), and the total (projected) annual income, I would be under a federal income guideline and owe no taxes.

After a short conversation with a neighbor, successful and younger, HE said I'd be subject to a 28% capital Gains tax, no matter what my income is.

My take, and please note that I’m not a CPA (my area of expertise is in payroll and payroll taxes) so don’t take this a gospel, but your neighbor, while he is “successful and younger” doesn’t sound to me as if he knows what he is talking about. The guy who does your taxes is “probably” correct but you should verify.

Unless you sold your capital interest in the resource, realizing a gain between your original cost basis (what you paid for it subject to allowable adjustments, expenses) and what you sold it for, then it would be a capital gain subject to capital gains taxes. If the payment is a royalty, I believe it is considered ordinary income, reported on your 1040 on Schedule E as reported on a 1099 under “Royalties”. (and I would note that even if you don't receive a 1099 because it falls below $600, that doesn't mean you don't have to report it on your tax return.)

As to whether you will have to pay taxes on the royalty (assuming that what the payment is), it all depends on a lot of factors such as the amount of the payment, other income you receive and what deductions you are entitled to and things you probably shouldn’t or wouldn’t want to discuss in detail on a public forum. I would also note that while “the guy” who does your taxes “may” be correct with respect to your total projected adjusted income falling below the threshold for having to pay income tax, your age alone (66) doesn’t magically exempt you from paying any income tax.

And your neighbor’s blanket statement regarding 28% being the capital gains tax rate is not even entirely correct. It would depend on whether it was a short term capital gain (which is taxed at the ordinary income tax rate) or a long term capital gain, what tax bracket you fall in and the type of capital gain.

Capital Gains tax rates vary depending on whether the gains are short-term or long-term.

Short-term gains taxed at ordinary income tax rates.

Long-term gains and qualified dividends taxed at

0% if taxable income falls in the 10% or 15% marginal tax brackets
15% if taxable income falls in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% marginal tax brackets
20% if taxable income falls in the 39.6% marginal tax bracket
25% on Depreciation Recapture
28% on Collectibles
28% on qualified small business stock after exclusion

http://taxes.about.com/od/Federal-Income-Taxes/fl/Federal-Income-Tax-Rates-for-the-Year-2014.htm

19 posted on 02/13/2014 6:30:08 AM PST by MD Expat in PA
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To: knarf; Vendome
It’s capital gains and passive income. That is: you don’t punch a time card for your money 28%...

No. You are incorrect. Please see my post #19. And this is a good example of why people shouldn’t ask for professional tax advice on an internet forum. : (

20 posted on 02/13/2014 6:46:20 AM PST by MD Expat in PA
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To: knarf

Okay. Capital gains are like this. We bought some property in 2000 with the intention of building a house. We didn’t and sold the property in 2012 and made a little money on it (should have sold it at the peak. DOH!) Anyway, since it was classified as a “long term” investment, we owed no taxes on the “gain” we got on our initial “capital” investment.


21 posted on 02/13/2014 8:10:49 AM PST by rktman (Under my plan(scheme),unemployment will necessarily skyrocket! Despite the % dropping. Period.)
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To: Vendome

Royalties are not capital gains.

It is not a asset growing in value. It is the selling of a commodity.


22 posted on 02/13/2014 9:06:33 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: MD Expat in PA

You’re correct.

I went back and read the post.

So what will passive income such as royalties be treated.

My income is pretty much royalty.

That is I do something once and get paid on it over and over , year after year.....

I occasionally get upfront monies from vendors but, mostly I earn residual like from an oil well, singing a song or making a movie.


23 posted on 02/13/2014 9:28:10 AM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: Vendome

Oil well royalties are not like movie rights royalties.

With the movie, you do the work once and other people use the same product over and over without diminishing the initial product.

Oil royalties is more like selling apples from your roadside stand. Each barrel of oil goes away from your possession, it is consumed by others and gone forever.


24 posted on 02/13/2014 9:40:43 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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