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Facing unruly students, teacher goes to court
Philly.com ^

Posted on 10/21/2003 4:47:27 AM PDT by Sub-Driver

Facing unruly students, teacher goes to court David Pitone, in his first week of teaching, sent them to the principal's office. They were sent back. He seeks a court order. By Susan Snyder Inquirer Staff Writer

During his first week as a new teacher this month, David Pitone was unable to handle the unruly students in his computer science class, so he sent them to the principal's office for discipline.

But officials at Audenried High School in South Philadelphia sent the students right back and told Pitone he had not followed proper disciplinary procedures.

Now, Pitone, 40, has taken the unusual step of turning to the courts for help. Pitone, who also happens to have a law degree, is a former computer engineer who is part of a special program that places professionals from other fields in teaching jobs while they get their teaching certificates.

In papers filed yesterday in Common Pleas Court, Pitone, who has taught only 21/2 days, is seeking an emergency court order that would temporarily allow him to eject students who he said cursed at and threatened him, while he seeks permission to do so through the district's grievance system.

"To me, this is an emergency," said Pitone, of Philadelphia, who has not been working since Wednesday, when he said he was told he could not eject students anymore. "People are making moves at me like they're going to punch me, then backing off. They know I can't kick them out. That leads to other students getting unruly."

District officials yesterday defended the school's position and said it was Pitone's job to manage his classroom.

"We're in the business of trying to keep students in the classroom. We're not in the business of kicking them out. He's a teacher. A teacher is a very, very tough thing to be. You have to be able to manage a lot of children in different stages of development. That's his job," said Wendy Beetlestone, the district's general counsel.

Audenried principal Bessie Young said yesterday that Pitone failed to fill out the proper forms to have students removed and that there was no evidence that a fight or threats had even occurred.

Disruptive student behavior has been a long-standing problem in the district, which last year adopted a tougher code of discipline.

Complaints such as Pitone's are not unique, but a teacher's seeking remedy through the courts is unusual.

Spokesmen for both the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association and experts on school discipline said they were unaware of a similar case.

Some observers said that it was unlikely that a judge would intervene until the teacher had exhausted all internal remedies through the teachers' union contract. It could take four to five months for a grievance case, and during that time, the teacher would be required to follow procedures.

A judge is scheduled to review the matter at 1:30 p.m. today.

Hearing of the situation, Irwin Hyman, a Temple University psychology professor who specializes in school discipline, said: "I know some teachers send kids to the principal's office every time a kid sneezes. That's wrong. But the principal shouldn't just send a kid back up to a brand-new teacher who doesn't know what he's doing. Obviously, the guy was having trouble handling these kids and needed help."

Ted Kirsch, president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, said most teachers would "love" to be able to send problem students to the office on the spot.

"It's not reality in an urban setting," Kirsch said. A teacher must show that he or she has made efforts to maintain order: "If you're there less than a week, I wonder what efforts you made."

In-classroom discipline strategies include lunchtime detentions, removal of privileges, and additional work. Some teachers also arrange with nearby colleagues to swap unruly students so that the students get some time out of the classroom where they had problems. Teachers also are encouraged to make calls home to parents.

Pitone said he was not asking for the students to be removed permanently. But he wanted a disciplinarian to deal with them before sending them back.

"I'm the teacher. They should have another group that handles discipline," he said.

Young, Audenried's principal, said Pitone "didn't want to follow any policies or procedures."

She also said he left the building in the middle of the school day without notifying anyone.

Pitone contends that he did fill out the proper discipline forms. He left because he was unhappy with the response from the school, he said.

Pitone said students were out of control on his first day, Oct. 7. Pitone said he then took three days off for medical reasons and returned Oct. 14.

"Almost every student would back talk every instruction," the court papers stated. He also observed "nude images" on a student's computer screen.

Pitone had little experience dealing with students before entering the classroom. He participated in four weeks of district training for new teachers in August, where, he said, he learned about establishing "consequences" for poor behavior and the importance of being "stern" at first to set the tone.

He does not have a teaching degree. He is enrolled in the Corporate to Classroom program, which started in September at Holy Family University.

Susan Dinnocenti, director of the program and an assistant professor at Holy Family, acknowledged that Pitone is a student "in good standing" but declined to comment further.

Pitone said he thought he would be able to remove students who cursed at him or acted in a threatening manner because that's the way it was when he was a student: "It's like hot dogs and apple pie. I just thought you could do it."


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; News/Current Events; US: Pennsylvania
KEYWORDS: discipline
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1 posted on 10/21/2003 4:47:28 AM PDT by Sub-Driver
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To: Sub-Driver
"People are making moves at me like they're going to punch me, then backing off."

That student, and the student's parents, need to go to jail, immediately. Any student who physically threatens a teacher should be beaten like a dog.
2 posted on 10/21/2003 4:49:01 AM PDT by Bronco_Buster_FweetHyagh
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To: Bronco_Buster_FweetHyagh
That student, and the student's parents, need to go to jail, immediately. Any student who physically threatens a teacher should be beaten like a dog.

Sadly, it's more typical that the beasts are sent back to class. I find it somewhat amusing that people from other fields come into the classroom and think it's going to be easy.

The teacher's associations should've sued many administrations starting decades ago for dereliction of duty.

3 posted on 10/21/2003 4:56:38 AM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: Sub-Driver
I couldn't agree more with this teacher's approach. School administrations are scared to death of lawsuits being brought by parents; it's time to turn the tables and fight fire with fire. The students who want to learn have a right to not have classes disrupted by thugs.
4 posted on 10/21/2003 5:01:16 AM PDT by Loyal Buckeye
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To: Sub-Driver
Shows pretty well what is going on in the schools - the animals are protected, the teachers who try to teach are told they are incompetent.
5 posted on 10/21/2003 5:05:40 AM PDT by gore3000 ("To say dogs, mice, and humans are all products of slime plus time is a mystery religion.")
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To: grania
Its not that they think it'll be easy. They did assume that there would be BASIC decorum though. For sure the true state of the public school system is an eye opener. One one hand you have a professional eager to teach and on the other a few kids that make sure no teaching or learning will take place sanctioned by the administration.
6 posted on 10/21/2003 5:06:16 AM PDT by 556x45
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To: Sub-Driver
Pitone failed to fill out the proper forms to have students removed and that there was no evidence that a fight or threats had even occurred.

1. Red Tape
2. Not supporting the instructor

Any wonder our schools are failing?

7 posted on 10/21/2003 5:09:34 AM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: Sub-Driver
Pitone, who also happens to have a law degree, is a former computer engineer

Yep, that's what a bureacracy does best: beats the noble spirit of service to one's fellows and "giving back to the community" right out of you.

OTOH, this guy strikes me as someone who doesn't know what he wants to do when he grows up.

8 posted on 10/21/2003 5:14:34 AM PDT by lafroste
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To: Sub-Driver
These kids were physically threatening the teacher. The teacher doesn't have to "handle it". There's no excuse for this kind of behavior. The lack of him being backed up shows how worthless most school administrators in an urban setting truly are. They don't want the applecart, or gravy train, to be upset in any way.

This man is correct. He needs to put a video camera in the classroom, and then, when one of these clowns does the threastened punch routine, call the cops and have him arrested.

The problem is, because this man has not been backed up, the kids know they have won, and will escalated the terrorism against this man.
9 posted on 10/21/2003 5:19:52 AM PDT by exit82 (Sound off to your elected reps in DC: Capitol switchboard toll free number 1-800-648-3516.)
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To: 556x45
A few years ago, one of the best schools money could buy was opened in a less-than-desirable urban neighborhood. It was new, clean, high tech and state of the art. It had the best teachers money could buy. Within a few short years it became run down and the maint staff either tired of fixing graffiti and vandalism or just plain gave up. The best teachers fled for other environs. Young gangsters and wannabe's disrupted education for those who did want an education. Many students just didn't see education as important to them and had parents who obviously agreed with them.

The result? The politicians screamed the school was failing and could only be saved with more money.

10 posted on 10/21/2003 5:21:20 AM PDT by umgud (gov't has more money than it needs, but never as much as it wants)
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To: grania
The teacher's associations should've sued many administrations starting decades ago for dereliction of duty.

Are you kidding? The teachers unions are the cause of this problem.

11 posted on 10/21/2003 5:29:18 AM PDT by laredo44
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To: Sub-Driver
Ted Kirsch, president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, said most teachers would "love" to be able to send problem students to the office on the spot.

"It's not reality in an urban setting,"

Ted Kirsh. "Exhibit One" for why urban students' achievement lags behind the rest of the country.

12 posted on 10/21/2003 5:32:12 AM PDT by laredo44
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To: Sub-Driver
re: Does anyone know where this originated from? )))

I have taught. This possibility has been toyed with before--at least in the minds of teachers with dangerous students and an indifferent admin bureaucracy.

The targets of the suit should be the students and parents, though--suing the school system just dumps on innocent taxpayers.

If a student can be tried as an adult in criminal cases, why not in civil? And upon a defaulted monetary judgement, perhaps an injunction against attending class be enforced instead. Expulsion by lawsuit...?

Incompetent parents regard the school system as a holding tank for their little thugs. Kick the punks out. What's so hard about this?

Students sure don't hesitate to sue the teachers. Turn it around.

13 posted on 10/21/2003 5:37:22 AM PDT by Mamzelle
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To: Loyal Buckeye
The students who want to learn have a right to not have classes disrupted by thugs.

That's the way it should be, but there is no such right. Public schools are a failing institution. The NEA for years has focused on indoctrination, rather than education or discipline. The best course for the good parents and students is to vote with their feet. Our country is considerably more wealthy, and has more educational resources than when public education was instituted. People shouldn't feel that the government schools are the only game in town.

14 posted on 10/21/2003 5:40:54 AM PDT by Moonman62
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To: Sub-Driver
Another advertizement for home schooling and private schools.
15 posted on 10/21/2003 5:46:57 AM PDT by FreedomPoster
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To: Sub-Driver
The school administrator said that it is the school's function and purpose to keep students in the classroom. That says it all about our public schools. He basically admitted that public schools exist as babysitting operations, the sole purpose of which is to keep the kids together in one place. That the administrator did not say that the schools' function and purpose is to TEACH the kids, clearly explains the deplorable performance of public education in America today.
16 posted on 10/21/2003 5:49:14 AM PDT by ought-six
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To: laredo44
"Are you kidding? The teachers unions are the cause of this problem."

Amen!
17 posted on 10/21/2003 5:52:14 AM PDT by ought-six
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To: Sub-Driver
The end result will be that they no longer invite lawyers to participate in this program.
18 posted on 10/21/2003 5:54:13 AM PDT by PBRSTREETGANG
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To: Sub-Driver
"We're in the business of trying to keep students in the classroom. We're not in the business of kicking them out. He's a teacher. A teacher is a very, very tough thing to be. You have to be able to manage a lot of children in different stages of development. That's his job," said Wendy Beetlestone, the district's general counsel.

What a maroon.

19 posted on 10/21/2003 5:56:03 AM PDT by BureaucratusMaximus (if we're not going to act like a constitutional republic...lets be the best empire we can be...)
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To: exit82
These kids were physically threatening the teacher.

In the eyes of the administration, there is no evidence that any student was physically threatening. Nor did the teacher do what he was supposed to do to maintain order. In order to have a good school, there must be a minimal level of complaints from those people that the administration has no contol over: the parents. Obviously, in this situation, the teacher is clearly at fault for not performing to the schools' standard procedures. Following proper procedure leads students by example and creates a better learning environment. When a teacher does not follow established procedure, it sends students the signal that it's OK to rebel against authority. SO if there are problems in the classroom, it's becasue of the disruptive nature of the teacher. < /sarcasm>

Personally, I hope more teachers bring many more lawsuits against their incompetent administrators.

20 posted on 10/21/2003 5:56:29 AM PDT by doc30
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To: Sub-Driver
Last year in Raymond NH a teacher got on her cell phone and called the police to report a 19 year old student for criminal threatening. The district and the teacher's union, if my memory is correct, disciplined the teacher and then covered this up.

There is no room for behavior from students that disrupt the mission of learning, anytime in school on the public dime. Clean up the schools and throw out the problem people and get to the job of teaching/learning and the result will be cheaper and better.
21 posted on 10/21/2003 6:01:45 AM PDT by Final Authority
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To: Sub-Driver
They should kick these kids out. They made thier choice in the classroom. Let them try to get by on the street with no education. And NO I do not feel ANY sympathy if they get involved with drugs, prostitution, etc. I’m tired of supporting drug habits and other crappy lifestyles with my HARD earned tax dollars no matter what the age of the recipient is OF those tax dollars.

Period.
22 posted on 10/21/2003 6:05:00 AM PDT by Dallas59
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To: Sub-Driver
Put two video cameras in his class room and eject/expel the trouble makers who prevent others from learning. Why should those with mental problems and drug problems be able to stop the students who want to learn?

If I ran a public school system the first priority would be classroom calm and discipline.
23 posted on 10/21/2003 6:06:24 AM PDT by dennisw (G_d is at war with Amalek for all generations)
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To: doc30
Let the teacher "hire" [for decent price] the toughest two guys in school to sit in his class and take care of the problem. No written agreements, just verbal. Call the student enforcers "mentors."
24 posted on 10/21/2003 6:07:25 AM PDT by razorbak
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To: Sub-Driver
My wife has been teaching for over 20 years at the middle school and high school level. The school system has degenerated beyond belief. Yes, there is little support from administrators… unbelievable rampant incompetence of principals.

She maintains an orderly quiet classroom, at a great emotional strain and drain. On a daily basis she is told by students, "I ain't gonna listen to any fu**ing white bitch"… books and papers are throw on the floor… walking around the room screaming… "You can't touch me"… obscene gestures… etc. Many students won't leave the classroom when instructed to do so… a cop has to take them out in hand cuffs. Virtually without exception offenders are sent back to the class room regardless of the discipline infraction, or left to roam the halls the remainder of the day.

When my wife phones a student's "home" she is immediately accused of being a racist and not liking blacks or hispanics... whatever the circumstance. White parents echo the tried and true, "He said he didn't do that."

There are "students" in middle schools that are 15 and 16 yrs old and have not earned more than 1 or 2 credits. There are students in the high schools that are 20 years old and have earned between 0 and 2 credits.

My wife's current teaching assignment is at a high school that has 6 full time city policemen on duty and 4 "principals". 2000+ students registered, and on parent-teacher conference days about a 100 parents show up. Most of the reading levels are at 3rd grade or less. When the Pledge of Allegiance is recited at the start of the school day most students remain seated.
In this district there are 23 schools on the state watch list due to low achievement scores. No one will talk about the real reasons for this sorry state of education. The solution to all these problems inacted by the school board was changing school day starting times to later in the morning because, "Studies have shown students do better with more sleep."
My wife has tendered her notice of retirement. It appears that in the next two years there will be well be between 600 to 1000 teachers retiring, to which the school superintendent commented, "Good, we'll be getting rid of a lot of high priced salaries."
25 posted on 10/21/2003 6:15:54 AM PDT by eborys
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To: ought-six
The school administrator said that it is the school's function and purpose to keep students in the classroom. That says it all about our public schools. He basically admitted that public schools exist as babysitting operations, the sole purpose of which is to keep the kids together in one place.

Actually, penal institutions, filled with people who are compelled to be there. As John Gatto pointed out, contrast the public school atmosphere to what you find in a library. People in the library want to be there, you see.

26 posted on 10/21/2003 6:20:13 AM PDT by TomSmedley ((technical writer looking for work!))
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To: Sub-Driver
Just a few months ago, a teacher in my community was beaten up by a fourteen year old boy and his mother. Apparently the teacher had sent this young man home due to his bad behavior. As soon as the kid got home and told his mother what happened, she called the school to talk to the teacher. Well, she talked alright! She threatened to come down to the school and kick this teacher's a$$. She carried through with her threat.

Both her and her son beat this poor woman. They actually picked up chairs in the classroom and used them to hit the teacher over her head. Another student who witnessed this attack ran out of the school and called the police. Both mother and son are in the county jail right now waiting to be tried in court.
27 posted on 10/21/2003 6:22:51 AM PDT by Arpege92
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To: Sub-Driver
"I'm the teacher. They should have another group that handles discipline," he said.

I was with him until I saw this statement. Does he expect the kids to just sit quietly to learn? - not in the real world. Does he expect someone else to sit in his classroom to control the kids? - not in any world.

28 posted on 10/21/2003 6:29:48 AM PDT by mathluv
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To: grania
The teacher's associations should've sued many administrations starting decades ago for dereliction of duty.

The administrators ARE IN the union, and probably are the administrators of the union.

29 posted on 10/21/2003 6:33:09 AM PDT by mathluv
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To: Sub-Driver
Pitone, who also happens to have a law degree, is a former computer engineer who is part of a special program that places professionals from other fields in teaching jobs while they get their teaching certificates.

The NEA will never let this guy teach period. It would be a threat to their dominance.

The gall this guy has - trying to maintain order in a classroom how insensitive!

30 posted on 10/21/2003 6:38:10 AM PDT by Nov3 (one day at a time since 10/12/1984)
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To: Sub-Driver
This type of behavior is commonplace, and tolerated in our government schools. Kids that used to be sent to reform school are now classified as "developmentally diasbled". A little creep so classified can cuss out a teacher, or even become physically violent, with no consequences.

Scummy "parents" make excuses for their progeny, and actively fight any disciplinary measures, no matter how just. In the name of political correctness, the worthless administration educrats set up one roadblock after another to prevent any real discipline from happening.

At my wife's middle school there are three layers of educrats between the teacher and the principal. In a middle school ! You'd think it was a university with all the "deans" and "coordinators" and such they have running around. All highly paid, and all contributing negatively to actual education.

The poor guy in the article came from the real world where people acting like his little creeps got fired and escorted off the property, or arrested. No wonder he can't handle the fantasy world of the educrat.

My prescription for education? Fire 90% of those who aren't classroom teachers, janitors, bus drivers or cooks. Cut the budget 50% - easy, as there are at least 2.8 non-teaching employees for every classroom teacher in HISD. Send any little creep who refuses normal discipline to reform school, like the old days.

Education would improve dramatically.

31 posted on 10/21/2003 6:54:58 AM PDT by jimt
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To: mathluv
In my 3rd year of teaching 2nd grade I had a student punch me in the stomach. I was 4 months pregnant at the time. Nothing happened to this student. He was back in my class the next day. I had been trying since day 1 to have the child removed from my classroom. I followed all the proper procedures and got no results. I tried sending him to the principal but he'd be back in my room within 5 minutes. I wasn't prepared to handle this child. I couldn't teach the other students because I was too busy dealing with this one child. Other kids would feed off of his behavior. I loved the few days that he was home sick! I finally quit and relocated to another state with my husband. I let the system get the best of me. I wasn't going to risk the life of my unborn child just to babysit this student. It wasn't worth it. I'll never go back to teaching in a public school.
32 posted on 10/21/2003 7:06:10 AM PDT by samiam1972 (Live simply so that others may simply live!)
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To: Nov3
The NEA will never let this guy teach period. It would be a threat to their dominance.

The school's administration probably dumped the worst students on him. They probably despise him, but mainly see a chance to dump their worst problems onto someone else's back.

If that teacher survives this year, and he's smart, he'll learn the game. Teachers use seniority to manage themselves into tolerable,insulated situations inside these animal shelters.

It's probably too late, however. He has comitted the unpardonable sin of showing that public ed is a feather bed.

33 posted on 10/21/2003 7:09:27 AM PDT by tsomer
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To: dennisw
Put two video cameras in his class room and eject/expel the trouble makers who prevent others from learning. Why should those with mental problems and drug problems be able to stop the students who want to learn?

Actually, there are already eyes and ears in the classroom. In some classes, whenever a teacher loses his/her temper or something unusual happens, the kiddies just take out their picture/cell phones and send the pictures and discussion to their friends in other classrooms. They all get a good laugh out of it.

Pretty pathetic, huh?

34 posted on 10/21/2003 7:17:52 AM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: mathluv
The administrators ARE IN the union, and probably are the administrators of the union.

I've always thought that was a conflict, that administrators should have their own union and that teachers would fare better as adversaries.

The union here is worthless. By the time a legal situation gets bad enough for it to be addressed, it can take years out of a person's life (it happened to a friend of mine, with a bogus charge).

I'm a retiree, and pay retired dues, granted, not a lot, but still I'm a member, right? Well, we don't have union legal protection in the classroom, and the union doesn't back us for things like prep period coverage.

Why do I do it? The local school recently got a decent administration that understands that if they treat substitutes like pool slime, they won't have any.

35 posted on 10/21/2003 7:25:00 AM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: Sub-Driver
I teach in a small college. I just found out yesterday that our local high schools no longer allow teachers to send students to the principles office at all except for actual physical violence. Has to be contact, no simulated contact.

I'm still shaking my head at this one. These are the students they are now sending me and expecting me to teach to be part of the local workforce. Sheesh.
36 posted on 10/21/2003 7:31:45 AM PDT by Wneighbor (U.S. Troops - Best in the World!)
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To: Mamzelle
>>Incompetent parents regard the school system as a holding tank for their little thugs. Kick the punks out. What's so hard about this?<<

I agree with you but I see a potential problem. After their Johnny gets kicked out of school he goes and knocks over a liquor store. He gets busted. Having his future ruined, the parents turn around and sue little Johnny's teachers/school/district/city/state government for keeping him from getting an education and having to knock over liquor stores.

Stranger things have happened.
37 posted on 10/21/2003 7:50:04 AM PDT by kancel
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To: TomSmedley
Contrast public schools with private schools. Students are generally happier in private school.


38 posted on 10/21/2003 7:58:44 AM PDT by ladylib
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To: exit82
"The problem is, because this man has not been backed up, the kids know they have won,"

The little bastards will see the true nature of their "victory" when they come face-to-face with "market forces," fail miserably and become unemployed or "under-employed (if such is possible), futily blame "The System," and win as their ultimate "victory" and honored place in the joint or on a slab.

All the more reason for the rest of us to lock and load.....

39 posted on 10/21/2003 8:03:15 AM PDT by tracer
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To: Sub-Driver
At freerepublic we should form a "Cousin Joey" fund.

The fund would establish cash used for bail and legal defense and funding to have either the teachers Kick these kids asses in the classroom. Or hire some same aged kid from the other side of town to come into the class and beat the sh*t of of these punks while the teachers back is facing the chalk board. When it is reported he can say...." He has seen no evidence that a threat or fight occured"

Now who wouldn't chip in for such an important educational funding mandate!
40 posted on 10/21/2003 8:09:25 AM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: grania
No cell phones in school either.
41 posted on 10/21/2003 8:19:34 AM PDT by dennisw (G_d is at war with Amalek for all generations)
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To: Sub-Driver
What I don't understand is you never hear of these students that assault the teachers get a little visit from one of teacher's relatives after school hours (if you know what I mean).

If your mother got violently mugged by someone, and you know where that someone is, their name, their address, and the authorities do nothing about it, what do you do? The response would more than likely be to take care of matters yourself.

That is exactly the situation here, and I'm surprised you don't hear more stories of retaliation by some members of the teacher's family against the violent student.

42 posted on 10/21/2003 8:21:37 AM PDT by PallMal
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To: PallMal
On the legal side:

My wife was directly verbally threatened by a student. The principal said, "Don't worry, he really didn't mean it."

She filled criminal charges. The kid was on parole and went back to jail.

Initially she was told by the principal that, as a teacher, she couldn't file charges. Which is a load of bull....

Being employed as a teach does not void your civil rights.
43 posted on 10/21/2003 8:46:16 AM PDT by eborys
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To: Bronco_Buster_FweetHyagh
Any student who physically threatens a teacher should be beaten like a dog.

I don't know about beating him/her like a dog, but severe punishment is in order. I believe the parents should be notified, the incident confirmed, and the student caned (like they do in Singapore). If this doesn't solve them problem, then the parents should be caned. If this doesn't solve the problem, send the whole family to prison and have them break rocks. After the third time of this having occured, you will almost never hear about such threats again.

44 posted on 10/21/2003 9:14:46 AM PDT by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin (Freedom is the freedom to discipline yourself so others don't have to do it for you.)
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To: gore3000
Shows pretty well what is going on in the schools - the animals are protected, the teachers who try to teach are told they are incompetent.

You have no idea how close you are to the truth in many instances. However, at present, I am teaching at an excellent school where discipline is ENFORCED. It's wonderful.

45 posted on 10/21/2003 9:15:43 AM PDT by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin (Freedom is the freedom to discipline yourself so others don't have to do it for you.)
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To: doc30
It's funny. Your sarcastic rant sounds like it is something taken directly from a new teacher's orientation seminar. I know you were only joking, but this honestly is not too far away from the real truth.
46 posted on 10/21/2003 9:31:18 AM PDT by SaveTheChief
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To: dennisw
Put two video cameras in his class room and eject/expel the trouble makers who prevent others from learning. Why should those with mental problems and drug problems be able to stop the students who want to learn?

I used to work in the low-voltage systems (commercial paging and audio, security, video, fire alarm, etc.) insdustry and would talk to facility managers of school systems to help them with whatever it is they needed. On one visit to a medium-size central Indiana college town one day, the facility manager told me that the liberals in that town would NEVER allow video cameras to be placed in their schools, and view this as a violation of civil rights.

I have seen many schools that have cameras placed in the hallways and at entrances, card access systems for front door security, and all kinds of security that is supposed to keep people out, but I don't recall ever seeing a school with cameras in the classrooms.

47 posted on 10/21/2003 9:39:46 AM PDT by SaveTheChief
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To: Bronco_Buster_FweetHyagh; MeneMeneTekelUpharsin
"People are making moves at me like they're going to punch me, then backing off."

That student, and the student's parents, need to go to jail, immediately. Any student who physically threatens a teacher should be beaten like a dog.

heh... that's what pressure points are for... work for me...

48 posted on 10/21/2003 9:45:58 AM PDT by g'nad
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To: gore3000
Yup. Vouchers are the only answer!
49 posted on 10/21/2003 9:58:26 AM PDT by fatidic
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To: SaveTheChief
A school in MO is now putting cameras in the classroom.
50 posted on 10/21/2003 9:58:36 AM PDT by ladylib
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