Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Nicotine studied as treatment for brain disorders
Boston Globe ^ | 11/12/2003 | Carey Goldberg

Posted on 11/12/2003 8:37:51 AM PST by A. Pole

Edited on 04/13/2004 2:11:01 AM PDT by Jim Robinson. [history]

Scientists reported yesterday that nicotine seems to diminish mental impairment stemming from stress or an underactive thyroid -- the latest in a growing body of evidence that the long vilified substance may help people with brain disorders ranging from Alzheimer's disease to schizophrenia.


(Excerpt) Read more at boston.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; US: Massachusetts
KEYWORDS: alcohol; alzheimer; drugs; memory; parkinson; prohibition; pufflist; smoke; smoking; tobacco; warondrugs; wod
Most of the risk associated with smoking comes from inhaling (first hand while second hand is a false PC myth). Smoke pipe or cigars and the gain might be bigger than the risk.
1 posted on 11/12/2003 8:37:53 AM PST by A. Pole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
No wonder so many non-smokers are nuts.
2 posted on 11/12/2003 8:41:52 AM PST by per loin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
nicotine seems to diminish mental impairment stemming from stress

THAT'S WHY PEOPLE SMOKE IN THE FIRST PLACE, YOU LAB-COATED IDJITS!!!

Oh, excuse me.

Science -- aided by research grant -- once again invents the wheel.

3 posted on 11/12/2003 8:44:09 AM PST by JennysCool
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole; *puff_list; Just another Joe; SheLion; CSM; Flurry; Max McGarrity; Mears; metesky
Levin said that money for the research is coming from pharmaceutical companies, federal grant-givers, charitable foundations, and tobacco companies. The tobacco money tends to be given in a ''very gingerly way'' -- putting no pressure on researchers for desired results -- because the companies have had so much bad publicity, he said.

UH-OH of this list of funding sources the gnatzies will only pick up of big bad tobacco - leaving out the fact that of course the pharmaceuticals are the ones that will reap the benefit of synthesized products.

idiots.

4 posted on 11/12/2003 8:46:52 AM PST by Gabz (Smoke gnatzies - small minds buzzing in your business - swat'em!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: per loin
You ain't kiddin. My best guess is a chart of the rise of general insanity in America would track EXACTLY with one charting the decline in nicotine use.
5 posted on 11/12/2003 8:46:59 AM PST by JennysCool
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: per loin
ROFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!
6 posted on 11/12/2003 8:47:46 AM PST by Gabz (Smoke gnatzies - small minds buzzing in your business - swat'em!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: JennysCool
Good post, your cool.
7 posted on 11/12/2003 8:48:51 AM PST by CSM (Stop the MF today!!! (Flurry, 11/06/2003))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
That explains it. Smokers are self medicated people with brain disorders.
8 posted on 11/12/2003 8:50:01 AM PST by VRWC_minion (Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and most are right)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: per loin
No wonder so many non-smokers are nuts.

LOL!

9 posted on 11/12/2003 8:52:29 AM PST by Aracelis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Willie Green; Wolfie; ex-snook; Cacophonous; Jhoffa_; FITZ; arete; FreedomPoster; Red Jones; ...
UH-OH of this list of funding sources the gnatzies will only pick up of big bad tobacco - leaving out the fact that of course the pharmaceuticals are the ones that will reap the benefit of synthesized products.

The real and better stuff will be forbidden together with the cheaper pharmaceutical version from Canada. The invisible hand of "free" market at work!

10 posted on 11/12/2003 8:56:17 AM PST by A. Pole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Gabz
"The tobacco money tends to be given in a ''very gingerly way'' -- putting no pressure on researchers for desired results --"

I thought the opposite was the case, the tobacco companies are the only ones with an agenda and they scew all studies to fit that agenda.
11 posted on 11/12/2003 9:19:41 AM PST by CSM (Stop the MF today!!! (Flurry, 11/06/2003))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: CSM
Of course the opposite is true - as long as you believe the pharaceutical funded antis that is.
12 posted on 11/12/2003 9:21:59 AM PST by Gabz (Smoke gnatzies - small minds buzzing in your business - swat'em!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
... a child who eats a cigarette is in serious danger...

Yes. A kid who will eat a cigarette will eat anything.

13 posted on 11/12/2003 10:40:01 AM PST by VadeRetro
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: VRWC_minion
That explains it. Smokers are self medicated people with brain disorders.

It could be true --- I knew a doctor who said that stress kills --- and smokers turn to cigarettes to relieve their stress and if they didn't, the stress would kill them before the cigarettes could. He was serious about it too, and he was a smoker.

14 posted on 11/12/2003 11:42:52 AM PST by FITZ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
Scientists reported yesterday that nicotine seems to diminish mental impairment stemming from stress or an underactive thyroid -- the latest in a growing body of evidence that the long vilified substance may help people with brain disorders ranging from Alzheimer's disease to schizophrenia.

Long vilified only by those who know nothing more about it than as a component of tobacco. The brain and muscles have nicotinic acid receptors, so the nicotine is obviously used for something. The reason tobacco works successfully as a drug is because it is able to modulate neurochemical release.
15 posted on 11/12/2003 11:47:49 AM PST by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: per loin
No wonder so many non-smokers are nuts.

And vice versa. At a recent talk I went to on nicotinic acid receptors in the brain, the speaker related how he had mentioned to an audience of MDs that most schizophrenics were smokers. He said the doctors laughed and said, "What do you mean "most"?" They thought that virtually all of them were. Nicotine receptor activity in the brain (among other things) modulates the dopaminergic system.
16 posted on 11/12/2003 11:53:29 AM PST by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: aruanan
Yes, smoking not only ameliorates schizophrenia, but also Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. It also enhances cognitive functioning. On the other hand, non-smoking abets obesity.
17 posted on 11/12/2003 12:07:57 PM PST by per loin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: aruanan
What's the dopaminergic system?
18 posted on 11/12/2003 12:16:52 PM PST by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: per loin
Yes, smoking not only ameliorates schizophrenia, but also Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's.

The data's supposed to be inconclusive on Alzheimer's. Some even thought that perhaps it was due to smokers dying off before they could develop Alzheimer's but controls using an early onset form of Alzheimer's showed the shaky data was not due to this. The neat thing about Parkinson's is that if you have ever been a smoker, you've a degree of protection.
19 posted on 11/12/2003 1:07:55 PM PST by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
My husband only smokes the pipe, I have tried it, but can't keep the darn thing lit. :-}
20 posted on 11/12/2003 1:25:38 PM PST by Great Dane (You can smoke just about everywhere in Denmark.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mears
What's the dopaminergic system?

The system by which dopamine exerts its influence (the -ergic part of the word. This sums it up pretty well, taken from


Dopamine: a potential substrate for synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms
Thérèse M. Jay

Progress in Neurobiology
Volume 69, Issue 6 , April 2003, Pages 375-390
In the field of catecholamine transmitters, dopamine (DA) pathways have then been recognized to play a critical role in cognition and emotion, and the last decade has seen a large increase in the experimental evidence for a role of DA in both synaptic plasticity and memory processes.

Since the discovery of LTP in the hippocampus ([Bliss and Lomo, 1973]), synapses that undergo plastic changes have been described in various parts of the brain and particularly in brain regions that receive DA innervations. It is now well established that the strength of synaptic transmission can be modified on a long-term basis by specific patterns of activation such as high frequency trains that produce LTP, and also by the action of endogenous modulators such as DA.

Different approaches from unit recording to lesion and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that DA plays a critical role in the modulation of neuronal activities that are related to different forms of learning and memory.

Converging evidence indicates that DA innervation of the prefrontal cortex plays a major role in working memory, a form of memory that allows to maintain and manipulate active representations of information that are held temporarily in mind. DA loss in the prefrontal cortex can lead to a great deficit in the performance of a working memory task in monkeys ([Brozoski et al]) as does lesion of the VTA in the rat ( [Simon et al]).

Synaptic plasticity induced in the different regions examined (hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex) does not appear to recruit the DA systems in similar manners. It is conceivable that a local regulation of these plastic events is specific to the region where the synapses are activated. Although a comparable DA modulation appears to be present in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, only the consolidation of LTP in the hippocampus is dependent on D1 receptors whereas a potential permissive and facilitatory effect of DA and D1 agonists is observed at an early stage of LTP and required for the initiation of this plastic event in the prefrontal cortex.

On top of a different subcellular DA innervation and spatial distribution of D1 and D5 receptors in the two regions that could explain these discrepancies, a distinct temporal combination between the glutamate and the modulatory DA pathways might also be at the origin, for functional purposes, of the immediate versus delayed recruitment of DA systems. Indeed, DA neurons are differentially activated depending on cognitive demands. Thus, the heterosynaptic influence of the DA signal could gain its selectivity from the activity patterns that are initiated in the VTA during changes in behavioral states and that are present in the DA inputs to the post-synaptic sites in the hippocampus or the prefrontal cortex. Whether the mesohippocampal or mesocortical DA systems are involved in different memory processes would differentially alter the relative strength of the synapses in the two regions. This mode of synaptic plasticity and modulation by a DA tone demonstrates a dynamic and specific regulation of synapses that may be important for memory.

The future will define more precisely at the cellular level which specific target cells of DA terminals and which receptors influence intrinsic and extrinsic circuits and at the molecular level which proteins are specifically involved in these DA/glutamate interactions relevant to plasticity and memory processes. Increased understanding of these mechanisms may also be relevant to the pathophysiology of DA-related psychiatric disorders.

21 posted on 11/12/2003 1:33:03 PM PST by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Great Dane
I have tried it, but can't keep the darn thing lit.

Do some research to get a good pipe. Some examples.

22 posted on 11/12/2003 1:53:03 PM PST by A. Pole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
I feel vindicated! I always found smoking to be helpful to my concentration. Mellow and smooth and brain-soothing tobacco, it's not as evil as they say.
23 posted on 11/12/2003 2:03:00 PM PST by Puddleglum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: aruanan
Thanks for your reply. Most of it is beyond my comprehension but I grasped a few facts.

Thanks again.
24 posted on 11/12/2003 3:15:22 PM PST by Mears
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: A. Pole
It is such a potent poison that a child who eats a cigarette is in serious danger

?????????
And just how old would this hypothetical child have to be to be in danger?

25 posted on 11/12/2003 4:56:53 PM PST by Just another Joe (FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: VRWC_minion
That explains it. Smokers are self medicated people with brain disorders.

If true, do you have a problem with self medication?

26 posted on 11/12/2003 4:57:47 PM PST by Just another Joe (FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Just another Joe
If true, do you have a problem with self medication?

Except for the adrenalin rush from pissing off smokers ?

27 posted on 11/12/2003 5:30:58 PM PST by VRWC_minion (Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and most are right)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Just another Joe; A. Pole
And just how old would this hypothetical child have to be to be in danger?

NICOTINE (this link may not work if one is outside an institution with a subscription to the journal)
Nicotine is a toxic alkaloid found in a range of plants, most notably tobacco. Nicotine is also used as a pesticide. Nicotine stimulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors throughout the central and autonomic nervous systems. In severe poisoning confusion and convulsions are accompanied by arrhythmias and parasympathetic over stimulation (see organophosphate poisoning).

Children most frequently encounter nicotine in the form of cigarette or cigarette butt ingestion. Vomiting is the commonest symptom following cigarette ingestion and tends to limit toxicity. Asymptomatic children who have ingested less than one cigarette or two cigarette butts should be observed for two hours. No specific treatment is required. Children who have consumed more than this amount, should receive activated charcoal.

--Poisoning in children 5: Rare and dangerous poisons Archives of Disease in Childhood 2002;87:407-410

Management of children who have ingested ß blockers, digoxin, oral hypoglycaemics, organophosphates, carbon monoxide, cyanide, isopropanol, ethylene glycol, methanol, Ecstasy, LSD, cocaine, nicotine, and isoniazid

M Riordan1, G Rylance2 and K Berry3

1 Department of Pediatrics, Yale University Medical School, USA
2 Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
3 Accident and Emergency Department, Birmingham Children’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK

28 posted on 11/12/2003 7:13:26 PM PST by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Just another Joe
It is such a potent poison that a child who eats a cigarette is in serious danger

Remember also that nicotine, when oxidized, becomes niacin (nicotinic acid), which is essential for health. There are many potent poisons that are essential for health.
29 posted on 11/12/2003 7:17:40 PM PST by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: aruanan
Children most frequently encounter nicotine in the form of cigarette or cigarette butt ingestion.

When you smoke almost most of nicotine (and other alkaloids) get destroyed by the fire. Very small part gets absorbed. Straight tobacco is too toxic.

30 posted on 11/12/2003 7:19:42 PM PST by A. Pole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: VRWC_minion
Except for the adrenalin rush from pissing off smokers ?

So that's your self medication, huh?
I feel sorry for anyone that has to piss off someone else for the rush of adrenaline.
You must be what I've heard reffered to as an "adrenaline junkie". Addicted yet?

31 posted on 11/12/2003 7:56:37 PM PST by Just another Joe (FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Just another Joe
You take me way to serious.
32 posted on 11/13/2003 11:13:37 AM PST by VRWC_minion (Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and most are right)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: VRWC_minion
You take me way to serious.

Tit for tat. ;^)

Use an emoticon to disable confusion.

33 posted on 11/13/2003 4:03:10 PM PST by Just another Joe (FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson