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Jacqueline Kennedy’s bloody suit
MSNBC ^ | 22-November-2003 | Pedantic_Lady

Posted on 11/21/2003 4:54:38 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady

WASHINGTON — Not long after that terrible day in Dallas — no one knows exactly when — a brown paper box arrived at the National Archives. The return address was on O Street, the Georgetown home of Jacqueline Kennedy’s mother. Packed inside was the pink Chanel suit first glimpsed Nov. 22, 1963, when the first lady joined JFK at a Fort Worth breakfast, and which, covered in his blood, she still wore the next morning to escort the slain president’s casket into the White House.

THERE IN THE Archives, the suit remains. Stored in a custom-designed corrugated board box, it rests on a gray steel shelf in a secured area of a suburban warehouse. It has never been cleaned. The wool skirt and jacket lie flat, with a suggestion of human form created by acid-free tissue paper folded inside the sleeves.

Only recently was a deed of gift obtained from the Kennedys’ sole surviving child, Caroline. But one hundred years will have to pass before the suit can again come before the American public. This condition is consistent with Mrs. Kennedy’s determination to balance her obligations to history with her family’s privacy. Archivists’ interests, moreover, are not only the past and present, but the future.

“Once it can be displayed it will really bring the ’60s to the present — whatever that present is,” said Steven Tilley, who oversees the Archives’ JFK Assassination Records Collection.

The Archives also has JFK’s jacket, shirt and tie — exhibits in the Warren Commission investigation of the shooting. But aside from the Brooks Brothers overcoat Abraham Lincoln wore to Ford’s Theater on April 14, 1865 — the lining embroidered with an American eagle and the words “One Country/One Destiny” — perhaps no clothing in American history carries the iconic power of that pink suit.

Even out of sight, it is an indelible image in public memory. The first lady made sure of that. She purposefully bore the horror and brutality of the president’s murder for a shattered nation to see. Had she changed or shielded her appearance, Americans’ experience of the assassination would have been fundamentally altered.

“Everybody remembers the pink suit,” Tilley said. Mrs. Kennedy brought nothing new to Texas, her press secretary, Pamela Turnure, recalled in Carl Sferrazza Anthony’s book, “As We Remember Her.” She took two suits, a cocktail dress and a day dress already in her wardrobe. Her clothes stole the show on foreign trips; on a domestic political trip, Turnure said, she didn’t want to deflect attention from the president.

A VISION IN PINK

The morning of Nov. 22, a crowd gathered at the president’s Fort Worth hotel. “Where’s Jackie?” admirers shouted when JFK appeared. “Mrs. Kennedy is organizing herself,” the president replied. “It takes longer. But of course she looks better than we do after she does it.”

Two-thousand Texans roared their approval when a vision in pink — JFK had picked the suit — finally walked into the Chamber of Commerce breakfast. Then it was on to Dallas. At 12:30 p.m., shots were fired at the motorcade, which then sped to Parkland Hospital. The Secret Service hurried Lady Bird Johnson out of her limousine, but not before she glanced over her shoulder. She described the scene to the Warren Commission: “I ... saw, in the president’s car, a bundle of pink, just like a drift of blossoms, lying on the back seat. I think it was Mrs. Kennedy lying over the President’s body.”

In her autobiography, Lady Bird recalled the scene aboard Air Force One while accompanying the casket to Washington: “Mrs. Kennedy’s dress was stained with blood. One leg was almost entirely covered with it and her right glove was caked, it was caked with blood — her husband’s blood. Somehow that was one of the most poignant sights — that immaculate woman exquisitely dressed, and caked in blood.”

FIRST LADY UNWAVERING

Mrs. Kennedy repeatedly rebuffed suggestions, beginning in the chaos outside Parkland’s trauma room, that she change clothes. In “The Death of a President,” William Manchester chronicled how tensions on Air Force One grew with “the feeling that something must be done about her appearance.” Mrs. Johnson tried; so, later, did Mrs. Kennedy’s own mother, Janet Auchincloss.

But she didn’t waver. Ambassador John Kenneth Galbraith had admired the first lady’s “excellent sense of theater” during a triumphant 1962 visit to India. What the fashion industry dubbed “the Jackie look,” the first lady saw as her “state wardrobe.” Through elegantly simple lines and a dazzling rainbow of strong solid colors — ice blue, leaf green, lemon yellow — she conveyed the youth, grace and style of President Kennedy’s New Frontier. Pink ran throughout, from a shell pink sequined chiffon evening gown to what Galbraith called a “radioactive pink” rajah-style coat.

With the president dead, that sense of theater turned to a new and determined purpose. “Keeping that clothing on was completely consistent with her realization that clothing is a medium of expression, and she wanted to say something to the world,” said Wake Forest University art Professor David Lubin, author of “Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images.”

‘WHAT THEY HAVE DONE TO JACK’

Mrs. Johnson never forgot the essence of that message, or the fierceness in the 34-year-old widow’s voice as she refused all entreaties to change her clothes. “I want them to see what they have done to Jack,” she said.

In that suit she stood at Lyndon B. Johnson’s side as he took the oath of office on Air Force One, “a silhouette from another world,” as Manchester put it. At Andrews Air Force Base, a proposal was made to exit the plane on the starboard side to avoid news photographers. She rejected it. One of the last pictures of her in the suit is in the East Room. Her shoulders hang heavily. Smeared blood covers a leg, and her gaze is fixed on the casket being lowered onto the catafalque.

At every sight of her, the nation’s grief deepened. In the private quarters of the White House, sometime around dawn on Nov. 23, she finally shed her bloodied clothing.

It’s hard to imagine, with her acute appreciation of history, that Mrs. Kennedy made no provision for the pink suit. Her maid later told Manchester that, while Mrs. Kennedy bathed, she “packed the clothes and hid the bag.” But there is no known record in the Archives explaining who later sent the box or why. There is only the return address, and in it, one small clue: an old postal zone used before zip codes, which began that July. So archivists speculate that it came to them not long after Nov. 22, 1963.

(Excerpt) Read more at msnbc.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: jfk; kennedyassassination
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As a Dallas native, I just have to say that Jackie Kennedy did our nation proud that day. She was class defined.
1 posted on 11/21/2003 4:54:38 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: Pedantic_Lady
I think that I read somewhere that, on the day that Reagan was shot, Jackie was visiting someone in the same hospital where they took RR, and comforted Nancy during his surgery.
2 posted on 11/21/2003 4:58:49 PM PST by Paul Atreides (Is it really so difficult to post the entire article?)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
Yeah, well, I've got my own.
3 posted on 11/21/2003 5:00:40 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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4 posted on 11/21/2003 5:03:27 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: Pedantic_Lady
Before my time but a sad day, I'm sure. Along with 911 and Princess Diana's death, it has to be one of the biggest news stories since WW2.
5 posted on 11/21/2003 5:03:51 PM PST by jjbrouwer (We'll stuff the Aussies in the Rugby World Cup final)
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To: jjbrouwer
Yeah...JFK was assassinated 12 years before I was born, but since I grew up in Dallas, I couldn't ever get away from it. They didn't open the 6th floor museum until I was a teenager and even when I was a kid, the assassination was kind of an off-limits topic; I think it was too painful for a lot of people. My dad was in downtown Dallas that day; he didn't see the shooting but he heard it; he won't talk about it. I knew John Brewer personally; he's the man who pointed Lee Harvey Oswald out to the Dallas police at the Texas Theater. We went on a field trip in 1987 to Dealey Plaza, then to the Dallas police station where Oswald was held and later murdered; we got to stand in the exact spot. They don't let you do that anymore.
6 posted on 11/21/2003 5:07:20 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: South40
The blood is seen on the skirt here.


7 posted on 11/21/2003 5:12:57 PM PST by Hillary's Lovely Legs (I have a plan. I need a dead monkey, empty liquor bottles and a vacuum cleaner.)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
It will be different tomorrow but I read somewhere that more people flock to Dallas each year to see Southfork (Miss Ellie/JR etc) than Dealey Plaza. Crazy old world.
8 posted on 11/21/2003 5:13:47 PM PST by jjbrouwer (We'll stuff the Aussies in the Rugby World Cup final)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
Yeah...JFK was assassinated 12 years before I was born

I was alive that day and I remember it quite well.

I was 6-years-old. My school was two blocks away from my home. I arrived home that day to find my mother sobbing while glued to the TV screen. I inquired as to what was wrong and she told me the president had been killed. I knew who JFK was as his picture was hanging on the wall in our living room.

My mother passed away on Sept. 30th of this year. At a gathering after her funeral my siblings and I went through boxes of her belongings. Among them were front page LA Times stories of both JFK and RFK's deaths. I have them now.

9 posted on 11/21/2003 5:14:36 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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To: jjbrouwer
I'm watching the Aussies sing their national anthem just now. They're playing the Kiwis. I love to watch Rugby to try and figure out the rules.

RE: Jackie Kennedy. Yes, she defined toughness through those days. But I doubt she married Ari for his looks.
10 posted on 11/21/2003 5:15:02 PM PST by Endeavor
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To: jjbrouwer
It will be different tomorrow but I read somewhere that more people flock to Dallas each year to see Southfork (Miss Ellie/JR etc) than Dealey Plaza. Crazy old world.

I don't know about that...when I took my husband to Dallas, Southfork was empty but Dealey Plaza was full of tourists; it is really what people go to see. It's to be avoided on the 22nd of November, though; it's full of weird conspiracy theorists who actually comb the knoll, looking for shell casings or some such nonsense. There's a JFK "Limo Tour" in Dallas, too; it's a restored Lincoln convertible limo similar to the one JFK used that day; they follow the parade route as accurately as possible (it can't be followed exactly because the direction of Houston street is one-way in the wrong direction) and when they get to a certain spot on Elm street, the car comes to a complete stop, plays tape of gunfire and screaming, then speeds off. It's so TACKY.

11 posted on 11/21/2003 5:18:21 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: Hillary's Lovely Legs
I've always been amazed at the incredible strength Jackie showed during that time.

I remember hearing a quote. When asked if she wanted to change clothes she said no...let them see what they have done.

Who was "they"?

12 posted on 11/21/2003 5:18:37 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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To: South40
My mother passed away on Sept. 30th of this year. At a gathering after her funeral my siblings and I went through boxes of her belongings. Among them were front page LA Times stories of both JFK and RFK's deaths. I have them now.

My dad was 18 at the time; he saved the morning paper from that day, the one with the "wanted for treason" bits in it, plus the later editions discussing the assassination itself. He kept the paper from when RFK was shot, too.

13 posted on 11/21/2003 5:19:43 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: Pedantic_Lady
There's a good documentary on Bravo right now, which documents an audio diary RFK kept after his brother's death. He talks about how disgusted he was at LBJ for parading Jackie around so soon after the shooting and how much he had been against Johnson's original appointment as Vice President.
14 posted on 11/21/2003 5:21:03 PM PST by jjbrouwer (We'll stuff the Aussies in the Rugby World Cup final)
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To: South40
Who was "they"?

'They' would be the person or people who were against her husband and caused his death. Kennedy stood in the way of power for a whole bunch of folks.

15 posted on 11/21/2003 5:25:23 PM PST by Hillary's Lovely Legs (I have a plan. I need a dead monkey, empty liquor bottles and a vacuum cleaner.)
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To: StarFan; Dutchy; alisasny; Black Agnes; BobFromNJ; BUNNY2003; Cacique; Clemenza; Coleus; DKNY; ...
ping

Please FReepmail me if you want on or off my infrequent ‘miscellaneous’ ping list.

16 posted on 11/21/2003 5:25:53 PM PST by nutmeg
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To: South40
Among them were front page LA Times stories of both JFK and RFK's deaths. I have them now.

I was 13 when JFK was assassinated. After hearing the news over the radio, I jumped on my bike and rode to the nearest newspaper racks where I purchased both the LA Times and the Herald Express with the JFK story on the front cover. I still have both copies.

17 posted on 11/21/2003 5:28:43 PM PST by Inyo-Mono
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To: Hillary's Lovely Legs
'They' would be the person or people who were against her husband and caused his death. Kennedy stood in the way of power for a whole bunch of folks.

I meant...more specifically. Who are the "folks"?

18 posted on 11/21/2003 5:28:46 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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To: Endeavor
RE: Jackie Kennedy. Yes, she defined toughness through those days. But I doubt she married Ari for his looks.

Probably not, but she was still far classier than some of the trash that passes for a celebrity these days.

19 posted on 11/21/2003 5:30:40 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: Hillary's Lovely Legs
'They' would be the person or people who were against her husband and caused his death. Kennedy stood in the way of power for a whole bunch of folks.

If you believe Sam Giancana's brother's book, the mob did it, one of the reasons being they helped put him in office with the understanding that Bobby would get the FBI off Giancana's back. Instead the hassling of Giancana and Friends increased, and you know the rest of the story.

20 posted on 11/21/2003 5:33:51 PM PST by Lizavetta
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To: South40
My mother passed away on Sept. 30th of this year.

Deepest sympathies on your loss.

21 posted on 11/21/2003 5:39:39 PM PST by jmc813 (Have you thanked Jeb Bush for his efforts in the Terri Schiavo case yet?)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
When my mother was young her family always went west for the summers, often staying at hotels with riding stables. Mother had her own horse in Houston that her surgeon grandfather kept stabled here for her and was a fine rider. She had a very clear recollection of meeting an elegant, well dressed girl with a New England accent who had “the most beautiful riding clothes.” They spent several days riding together and “her name was Jacqueline, but her last name was to hard to say.” They shared the same birthday though the girl was a year younger. My mothers birthday was July 29, 1928 and she was always convinced that it was Jacqueline Bouvier.
22 posted on 11/21/2003 5:39:51 PM PST by HoustonCurmudgeon (PEACE - Through Superior Firepower)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
If you haven't seen "The House of Yes", rent it. I thought it was hilarious, and Parker Posey looks terrific in the pink dress.

Jackie-O is anxiously awaiting the visit of her brother home for Thanksgiving, but isn't expecting him to bring a friend. She's even more shocked to learn that this friend is his fiance. It soon becomes clear that Jackie Kennedy's obsession is nothing compared to her obsession with her brother, as it also becomes clear she isn't the only member of the family with problems...

23 posted on 11/21/2003 5:40:28 PM PST by clamboat
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To: Pedantic_Lady
“Keeping that clothing on was completely consistent with her realization that clothing is a medium of expression, and she wanted to say something to the world,” said Wake Forest University art Professor David Lubin, author of “Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images.”

"Shooting Kennedy" indeed. For an art professor, he's got some bad taste.

And yes, taking all her clothes off probably would have sent the wrong message, though it would have gotten people's minds off the assassination.

24 posted on 11/21/2003 5:41:43 PM PST by x
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To: South40
Who are the "folks"?

Something tells me that there will be countless FR threads dedicated to such questions tommorrow. :-) Looking forward to it.

25 posted on 11/21/2003 5:42:42 PM PST by jmc813 (Have you thanked Jeb Bush for his efforts in the Terri Schiavo case yet?)
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To: clamboat
I've seen it :-)
26 posted on 11/21/2003 5:44:03 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: jmc813
Deepest sympathies on your loss. Thanks. It is much appreciated.
27 posted on 11/21/2003 5:44:31 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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To: HoustonCurmudgeon
Perhaps it was :-)
28 posted on 11/21/2003 5:44:51 PM PST by Pedantic_Lady
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To: Pedantic_Lady
I may be the only Freeper to have met both John Kennedy, Jr. and Lee Oswald's daughter.

You know, I may be the only one.
29 posted on 11/21/2003 5:50:25 PM PST by lavrenti ("Tell your momma and your poppa, sometimes good guys don't wear white." The Standells)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
Nice thread. Most of the replies have been civil and respectful. Regardless of JFK having been a Dem, he was nevertheless, the President of the United States of America. His assassination was a despicable thing and a blow to the honor of the nation. Jackie O was a perfect First Lady in my opinion.
30 posted on 11/21/2003 5:52:04 PM PST by Henchman (I Hench, therefore I am!)
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To: Henchman
JFK is the only democrat to have proposed and gotten a tax cut passed. He was very unlike any democrat alive today. Say tax cut to a democrat today and its like waving a cross at Daracula. In fact today's democrat has much in common with Daracula.
31 posted on 11/21/2003 6:06:33 PM PST by kylaka
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To: jmc813
Ah, yes! I've probably read 90% of the books written on the subject, and have reached a conclusion that just about ties up all the loose ends. I was 10 at the time, but my parents were able to give me a rather unique perspective on the matter, which fueled my later interest.
32 posted on 11/21/2003 6:15:28 PM PST by kylaka
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To: jjbrouwer
Before my time but a sad day, I'm sure. Along with 911 and Princess Diana's death, it has to be one of the biggest news stories since WW2.

I vote moon landing. No disrespect to the Kennedys. But I did live through that, and I'd rather not again. I did live through the moon landing, and I wouldn't mind repeating that.

33 posted on 11/21/2003 6:19:07 PM PST by MrsEmmaPeel
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To: Pedantic_Lady
My Dad took me to the Inaugural Parade for JFK. His limo passed by very close and we had a good view. I also saw him at a political rally before he was elected President. I remember listening to his address on the radio on the Cuban missle crisis and thought we were on the brink of another World War. We were glued to the TV when he was assasinated.
It really affected the nation and the world. A lot of young people were inspired by JFK. The Peace Corp is an example of the service that some have provided. It was certainly a different era.
34 posted on 11/21/2003 6:24:59 PM PST by ADSUM (Democracy works when citizens get involved and keep government honest.)
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To: South40
"When asked if she wanted to change clothes she said no...let them see what they have done. Who was "they"?"

Jackie was blaming the country for killing her husband.

35 posted on 11/21/2003 6:36:10 PM PST by Irene Adler
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To: Irene Adler
Jackie was blaming the country for killing her husband.

The country!?

My parents had a picture of the president on our living room wall. My mother loved him...as did many.

I doubt she was blaming the country.

36 posted on 11/21/2003 6:38:17 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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To: South40
I am very familiar with this quotation from Jackie at the time. That is my very strong belief, and I stand by it. I have read many statements from her that show a strong resentment of the U.S. as a whole (that is, the rednecks--everybody but her social equals) for her husband's murder.
37 posted on 11/21/2003 6:41:12 PM PST by Irene Adler
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To: Irene Adler
I am very familiar with this quotation from Jackie at the time. That is my very strong belief, and I stand by it. I have read many statements from her that show a strong resentment of the U.S. as a whole (that is, the rednecks--everybody but her social equals) for her husband's murder.

I'm very familiar with it also and I just can't believe she thought the country who loved him murdered him.

But...hey...we're all free to believe what we want. ;-)

38 posted on 11/21/2003 6:44:10 PM PST by South40 (My vote helped defeat cruz bustamante; did yours?)
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To: South40
Were you alive during the period? There were bestselling books that were VERY critical of the Kennedys such as JFK: The Man and the Myth which were published with great fanfare during his brief presidency. The country as a whole cannot be said to have "loved" him when he was alive. He was elected by an exceedingly slim majority, if he had one at all. Both I and my husband personally remember people who were thrilled when he was assasinated. I do NOT support such feelings, but I report them bacause they definitely existed. The Kennedys were very controversial and stirred up as much dislike as they did popularity. There was a huge wave of revulsion against the US as a whole by the press at the time, blaming the country for JFK's death. Jackie made many statements indicating that she agreed with this estimation, and it was one of the prime reasons (along with big money) thatshe married Onassis and left the country. I remember all of this personally since I lived through the period.
39 posted on 11/21/2003 6:56:30 PM PST by Irene Adler
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To: Pedantic_Lady
You know what I've never understood? What was that business with her crawling over the trunk of the limo? Seems to me your first instinct in a situation like that would be to hold your loved one close to your heart, try to protect him, as Mrs. Connoly did.

Any ideas?
40 posted on 11/21/2003 6:56:56 PM PST by Burn24
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To: Irene Adler
The Kennedys were very controversial and stirred up as much dislike as they did popularity.

Was this based on political disagreement or his religious affiliation?

There was a huge wave of revulsion against the US as a whole by the press at the time, blaming the country for JFK's death.

I'm not sure I understand this. The press "blamed the country"? How?

41 posted on 11/21/2003 7:01:59 PM PST by workerbee
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To: Burn24
She was trying to recover pieces of his skull and brain.
42 posted on 11/21/2003 7:04:15 PM PST by Poohbah ("Beware the fury of a patient man" -- John Dryden)
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To: Burn24
Any ideas?

She was trying to retrieve a part of his head, not to be grotesque, but I have seen that reported in many books. There is indeed a part lying on the trunk. It may sound crazy, but you just don't know what you'll do in a situation like that. I'm sure people don't always act rationally.

43 posted on 11/21/2003 7:04:32 PM PST by dubyagee
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To: Poohbah; dubyagee
Yikes! Thanks for clearing that up.
44 posted on 11/21/2003 7:06:56 PM PST by Burn24
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To: Burn24
Not to gross anyone out here, but I remember reading that Jackie climbed onto the trunk to retrieve a portion of her husband's skull. If I'm recalling correctly, she said she was acting on autopilot and not thinking of her safety, but only trying to help her husband. I can't even imagine the trauma she suffered that day. I don't remember JFK's assassination (only 3 at the time), but I do remember how devastated my mother was at Bobby's in 1968. It was a different era.
45 posted on 11/21/2003 7:08:57 PM PST by strictlyaminorleaguer
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To: Burn24
"You know what I've never understood? What was that business with her crawling over the trunk of the limo? Seems to me your first instinct in a situation like that would be to hold your loved one close to your heart, try to protect him, as Mrs. Connoly did."

She was trying to get the secret service man from the back of the car up to the President.

46 posted on 11/21/2003 7:12:42 PM PST by Grammy
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To: Grammy
She was trying to get the secret service man from the back of the car up to the President.

After reading this I searched the web for jfk assassination video to see if I agreed with you. The part about Jackie climbing out to pick up bone/brain off the trunk just never made sense to me (even considering the circumstances). Anyway, I found some excellent vidcaps from the Zapruder film. The website was made an anti-Bush wacko but the caps are good so I'll just link to the videos themselves (they use the divx codec):

1. Full frame version

2. Close up Kennedy and Connally

The close up is very graphic (sickening, actually) but shows some interesting things. JFK was shot in the throat just as he emerged from behind the street sign. His arms come up to his throat in an automatic reaction. Connally must have been hit by the same shot because he jumps and turns to look back. You can see that he says "Ouch".

Jackie grabs on to JFK's left arm and appears to say something to Connally. She then realizes that JFK is hurt, too, and curves around in front of him to see what's wrong. That's when the horrible head shot impacts. Jackie's face was only a few inches away at the time. Startled, her right hand flies up to the back of JFK's neck as he slumps over. She then, without turning to look at the trunk, starts to climb over the seat, even pushing off of JFK's head with her left hand. When she's halfway over the seat the Secret Service agent runs up, stops her, and tells her to get back into the car as they speed off.

You know what I think? Do you care? Anyway, it looks to me like Jackie was, understandably, panicked from having her husband shot right in front of her. I think she was tring to climb out of the car to get away. She never looked back at the trunk until she was already climbing out. If she was going to retrieve a bone fragment, wouldn't she have had to see it first?

47 posted on 11/21/2003 8:40:36 PM PST by mikegi
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To: Pedantic_Lady
"Who is 'they'? "

We'll never know who Jackie was referring to when she said "they".

However, in the context of today's liberal thought processes, "they" means the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy.

Leni

48 posted on 11/21/2003 8:52:50 PM PST by MinuteGal (Everyone...start saving your pesos for the next cruise. Great mutual Christmas gift for the family!)
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To: Pedantic_Lady
I agree.
49 posted on 11/21/2003 9:16:25 PM PST by Frank_2001
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To: clamboat
Yeah, that's a real interesting movie. I have a thing for Parker Posey, mostly because I once dated a girl who looked a lot like her. At least to me.
50 posted on 11/21/2003 9:19:29 PM PST by PLMerite ("Unarmed, one can only flee from Evil. But Evil isn't overcome by fleeing from it." Jeff Cooper)
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