Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Revelations from the Russian Archives [a peek at the far left]
Library of Congress ^

Posted on 12/26/2003 6:01:11 AM PST by The Raven

In the years immediately following their accession to power in 1917, the Bolsheviks took measures to prevent challenges to their new regime, beginning with eliminating political opposition. When the freely-elected Constituent Assembly did not acknowledge the primacy of the Bolshevik government, Vladimir Lenin dissolved it in January 1918. The Left Socialist Revolutionary Party, which protested the action, withdrew from the Bolshevik coalition in March, and its members were automatically branded enemies of the people. Numerous opposition groups posed military threats from various parts of the country, placing the survival of the revolution in jeopardy. Between 1918 and 1921, a state of civil war existed.

Bolshevik policy toward its detractors, and particularly toward articulate, intellectual criticism, hardened considerably. Suppression of newspapers, initially described as a temporary measure, became a permanent policy. Lenin considered the Constitutional Democrats (Kadets) the center of a conspiracy against Bolshevik rule. In 1919, he began mass arrests of professors and scientists who had been Kadets, and deported Kadets, Socialist Revolutionaries, Mensheviks, and Nationalists. The Bolshevik leadership sought rapidly to purge Russia of past leaders in order to build the future on a clean slate.

These harsh measures alienated a large number of the intellectuals who had supported the overthrow of the tsarist order. The suppression of democratic institutions evoked strong protests from academics and artists, who felt betrayed in their idealistic belief that revolution would bring a free society. Writers who had emigrated shortly after the revolution published stinging attacks on the new government from abroad. As a result, further exit permits for artists were generally denied.

The disenchantment of the majority of intellectuals did not surprise Lenin, who saw the old Russian intelligentsia as a kind of rival to his "party of a new type," which alone could bring revolutionary consciousness to the working class. In his view, artists generally served bourgeois interests, a notion that fueled the persecution of intellectuals throughout the Soviet period

From the beginning of their regime, the Bolsheviks relied on a strong secret, or political, police to buttress their rule. The first secret police, called the Cheka, was established in December 1917 as a temporary institution to be abolished once Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks had consolidated their power. The original Cheka, headed by Feliks Dzerzhinskii, was empowered only to investigate "counterrevolutionary" crimes. But it soon acquired powers of summary justice and began a campaign of terror against the propertied classes and enemies of Bolshevism. Although many Bolsheviks viewed the Cheka with repugnance and spoke out against its excesses, its continued existence was seen as crucial to the survival of the new regime.

Stalin had eliminated all likely potential opposition to his leadership by late 1934 and was the unchallenged leader of both party and state. Nevertheless, he proceeded to purge the party rank and file and to terrorize the entire country with widespread arrests and executions. During the ensuing Great Terror, which included the notorious show trials of Stalin's former Bolshevik opponents in 1936-1938 and reached its peak in 1937 and 1938, millions of innocent Soviet citizens were sent off to labor camps or killed in prison.

By the time the terror subsided in 1939, Stalin had managed to bring both the party and the public to a state of complete submission to his rule. Soviet society was so atomized and the people so fearful of reprisals that mass arrests were no longer necessary. Stalin ruled as absolute dictator of the Soviet Union throughout World War II and until his death in March 1953.

The murder of Sergei Kirov on December 1, 1934, set off a chain of events that culminated in the Great Terror of the 1930s. Kirov was a full member of the ruling Politburo, leader of the Leningrad party apparatus, and an influential member of the ruling elite. His concern for the welfare of the workers in Leningrad and his skill as an orator had earned him considerable popularity. Some party members had even approached him secretly with the proposal that he take over as general secretary.

It is doubtful that Kirov represented an immediate threat to Stalin's predominance, but he did disagree with some of Stalin's policies, and Stalin had begun to doubt the loyalty of members of the Leningrad apparatus. In need of a pretext for launching a broad purge, Stalin evidently decided that murdering Kirov would be expedient. The murder was carried out by a young assassin named Leonid Nikolaev. Recent evidence has indicated that Stalin and the NKVD planned the crime.

Stalin then used the murder as an excuse for introducing draconian laws against political crime and for conducting a witch-hunt for alleged conspirators against Kirov. Over the next four-and-a-half years, millions of innocent party members and others were arrested -- many of them for complicity in the vast plot that supposedly lay behind the killing of Kirov. From the Soviet point of view, his murder was probably the crime of the century because it paved the way for the Great Terror. Stalin never visited Leningrad again and directed one of his most vicious post-War purges against the city -- Russia's historic window to the West.

The Soviet system of forced labor camps was first established in 1919 under the Cheka, but it was not until the early 1930s that the camp population reached significant numbers. By 1934 the Gulag, or Main Directorate for Corrective Labor Camps, then under the Cheka's successor organization the NKVD, had several million inmates. Prisoners included murderers, thieves, and other common criminals--along with political and religious dissenters. The Gulag, whose camps were located mainly in remote regions of Siberia and the Far North, made significant contributions to the Soviet economy in the period of Joseph Stalin. Gulag prisoners constructed the White Sea-Baltic Canal, the Moscow-Volga Canal, the Baikal-Amur main railroad line, numerous hydroelectric stations, and strategic roads and industrial enterprises in remote regions. GULAG manpower was also used for much of the country's lumbering and for the mining of coal, copper, and gold.

UKRAINIAN FAMINE

The dreadful famine that engulfed Ukraine, the northern Caucasus, and the lower Volga River area in 1932-1933 was the result of Joseph Stalin's policy of forced collectivization. The heaviest losses occurred in Ukraine, which had been the most productive agricultural area of the Soviet Union. Stalin was determined to crush all vestiges of Ukrainian nationalism. Thus, the famine was accompanied by a devastating purge of the Ukrainian intelligentsia and the Ukrainian Communist party itself. The famine broke the peasants' will to resist collectivization and left Ukraine politically, socially, and psychologically traumatized.

The policy of all-out collectivization instituted by Stalin in 1929 to finance industrialization had a disastrous effect on agricultural productivity. Nevertheless, in 1932 Stalin raised Ukraine's grain procurement quotas by forty-four percent. This meant that there would not be enough grain to feed the peasants, since Soviet law required that no grain from a collective farm could be given to the members of the farm until the government's quota was met. Stalin's decision and the methods used to implement it condemned millions of peasants to death by starvation. Party officials, with the aid of regular troops and secret police units, waged a merciless war of attrition against peasants who refused to give up their grain. Even indispensable seed grain was forcibly confiscated from peasant households. Any man, woman, or child caught taking even a handful of grain from a collective farm could be, and often was, executed or deported. Those who did not appear to be starving were often suspected of hoarding grain. Peasants were prevented from leaving their villages by the NKVD and a system of internal passports.

The death toll from the 1932-33 famine in Ukraine has been estimated between six million and seven million. According to a Soviet author, "Before they died, people often lost their senses and ceased to be human beings." Yet one of Stalin's lieutenants in Ukraine stated in 1933 that the famine was a great success. It showed the peasants "who is the master here. It cost millions of lives, but the collective farm system is here to stay."..

(Excerpt) Read more at loc.gov ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Russia
KEYWORDS: archives; lenin; russia
This is one way to eliminate class struggle.
1 posted on 12/26/2003 6:01:12 AM PST by The Raven
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: The Raven
Stalin intentionally murdered 10 million peasants in the Ukraine. The Republic of the Ukraine has petitioned for the revocation of the Pullitzer prize awarded to the New York Times for its reportage on the achievements of "uncle" Joe Stalin and Russian socialism, since the NYT ignored the carnage and failed to report the truth (the petition was recently denied, but I think I recall that the Republic of the Ukraine will continue to try to reveal the truth about Stalin and NYT complicity in the great lie).

Stalin also probably murdered his wife, by the way.

2 posted on 12/26/2003 6:19:55 AM PST by TheGeezer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
bump
3 posted on 12/26/2003 6:36:51 AM PST by RaceBannon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
Two points to ponder.
1. We are engaged in "a battle for the soul of the
Republic".
2. Liberals are the intellectual heirs of the American
Communist Party.

Much as I disliked Poe, his line croaked the Raven - "Nevermore" is worth remembering.

Never forget the poison fruits of he Tree of Liberalism.
4 posted on 12/26/2003 6:39:58 AM PST by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon liberty, it is essential to examine principles - -)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
The disenchantment of the majority of intellectuals did not surprise Lenin, who saw the old Russian intelligentsia as a kind of rival to his "party of a new type," which alone could bring revolutionary consciousness to the working class. In his view, artists generally served bourgeois interests, a notion that fueled the persecution of intellectuals throughout the Soviet period.

Funny, to gain power they court the "intellectuals" and who do they round up and send to the gulags first? The "intellectuals!"

One would think that the "intellectuals" could read history and learn from it. Then again they are "intellectuals."

5 posted on 12/26/2003 6:59:08 AM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
Very fascinating. Thanks for posting.
6 posted on 12/26/2003 7:16:39 AM PST by PistolPaknMama
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
Stalin also probably murdered his wife, by the way.

I didn't know that. What was she "guilty" of?

7 posted on 12/26/2003 7:18:59 AM PST by PistolPaknMama
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

bfl
8 posted on 12/26/2003 7:20:27 AM PST by VeniVidiVici (There is nothing Democratic about the Democrat party.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
It cost millions of lives, but the collective farm system is here to stay.

What an alibi for murder. Beware of nutjobs inventing alibis for anything.

9 posted on 12/26/2003 7:28:02 AM PST by JudgemAll
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
Bump!
10 posted on 12/26/2003 7:28:23 AM PST by zeugma (The Great Experiment is over.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SandRat
Intellectuals are tenured idiots who are not chosen by markets or by their work worth, but by committee judges and proofs and references. The intellectuals are bitter and suspicious at the capitalists who seem to make it with gut instinct and without proving his plan will work.

So the smart arse intellectual decides to ask the working proletaria it can easily manipulate, impress and mystify, to join forces against the suspicious, if not, guilty capitalists. Of course the workers are not there to accept the imposed rules of the intellectuals, which are more disastrous, less workable and less "optionable" than market "rules". So they revolt against the intellectuals. Of course, the only winner in the utopia of the materless communist society is the remaining master who rules over every single detail of society without intermediary judges, but puppet judges acting under direct orders of enforcement.

Yep, when they kill all the masters, only one master remains at the helm of this human life sewage system. No good did goes unpunished, and whoever can advertise doing something wicked is most likely to be admired.

11 posted on 12/26/2003 7:35:02 AM PST by JudgemAll
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
Additional reading In Denial: Historians, Communism, and Espionage
12 posted on 12/26/2003 7:41:02 AM PST by The Raven
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
My wife has a Ukranian friend who is in her late 20's. She was raised being told stories of the Ukrainian famine. It was known as the "Fake Famine." You can surf to Ukranian historical sites and read about it. It would seem that no one has forgotten. Atheistic Communism at work.
13 posted on 12/26/2003 7:46:17 AM PST by Zack Nguyen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
since the NYT ignored the carnage and failed to report the truth...

Ther were a lot of American journalists who were nothing more than whores for a mass murderer.

14 posted on 12/26/2003 7:47:08 AM PST by Zack Nguyen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: PistolPaknMama
What was she "guilty" of?

The evidence suggests she protested to Stalin about his murders.

15 posted on 12/26/2003 7:56:34 AM PST by aristeides
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
The ugly irony of Stalin's mass murder of the Ukrainian middle class farmers was that the deafening silence among the West's intelligencia and news services (thanks in large measure to the misinformation of Walter Duranty of the New York Times) had a profound influence on the German National Socialists, who had extensive ties with the Soviet Armed forces in the early thirties. The German Luftwaffe for example trained in secret in the Soviet Union the first years of Hitler's rule.

The German military attaches reported the murders of the millions in the Ukraine, and set the stage for the murder of six millions Jews and millions of other "undesirables" by the Nazis... continuing the pioneering work of the Socialist vanguard, the USSR, in the 1930's

16 posted on 12/26/2003 8:00:56 AM PST by chilepepper (The map is not the territory -- Alfred Korzybski)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: chilepepper
The German Luftwaffe for example trained in secret in the Soviet Union the first years of Hitler's rule.

The military cooperation between Germany and the Soviet Union ended quite early in Hitler's rule, between May and October 1933. Sebastian Haffner describes how in his book Der Teufelspakt: Die deutsch-russischen Beziehungen vom Ersten zum Zweiten Weltkrieg (pp. 131-2).

Haffner's words, published in 1988, were confirmed by the Soviet documents later revealed and published in Yuri Djakov & Tatyana Bushuyeva, The Red Army and the Wehrmacht: How the Soviets Militarized Germany, 1922-33, and Paved the Way for Fascism.

17 posted on 12/26/2003 8:21:32 AM PST by aristeides
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Zack Nguyen
"My wife has a Ukranian friend who is in her late 20's. She was raised being told stories of the Ukrainian famine. It was known as the "Fake Famine." You can surf to Ukranian historical sites and read about it. It would seem that no one has forgotten. Atheistic Communism at work.

It must be remembered that Ukranians of today did not descend fron those who starved but from the "starvers".

18 posted on 12/26/2003 9:00:28 AM PST by shamusotoole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: PistolPaknMama
She publicly humiliated him at a party, if I recall correctly. She was found dead of, allegedly, a self-inflicted gunshot wound later that same evening.
19 posted on 12/26/2003 9:01:53 AM PST by TheGeezer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
The libs of today don't seem to give a whiff about the millions executed by socialists for non-conformity or simply to produce fear......and for what? -- For this ideology?

The libs are still fighting for this neutral class state (tax the rich)...and it bogglers the mind. They can't get humans to vountarily abide by this system. They can't scare them into it. They can't force them into it. So they kill them.

Far greater atrocities than Hitler and yet it's invisible in your children's history books.

Don't let go of the 2nd Amendment.
20 posted on 12/26/2003 9:15:23 AM PST by The Raven
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
Soft handed intellectuals in America still yearn for socialism and Soviet communism, which both proved deadly to.... intellectuals. They are the first to be shot or sent to the gulags.

Effete middle managers, liberal teachers, angry old hippies, shallow entertainers, democrat politicians, they all seem to have skipped class the day we learned of the 20th century's greatest atrocities. 100 million murdered. A billion ruined lives at minimum.

Apparently, common sense and self interest have no place in the intellectual's thought process. History teaches only those who pay attention.
21 posted on 12/26/2003 9:33:06 AM PST by moodyskeptic (weekend warrior in the culture war)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Raven
BTT READ LATER
22 posted on 12/26/2003 10:19:43 AM PST by mel
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PistolPaknMama
Probably of mayying old Joe-then telling a neighbor he wasn't so hot.
23 posted on 12/26/2003 10:46:00 AM PST by StonyBurk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Zack Nguyen
NYT ignored the carnage and failed to report the truth

Withdraw the Pulitzer and give them the Jayson Blair prize instead.

24 posted on 12/26/2003 11:33:24 AM PST by reg45
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: TheGeezer
achievements of "uncle" Joe Stalin and Russian socialism, ==

It was SOVIET socialism. Joe Stalin wasn't russian but georgian. In modern Georgia there still celebrations of his birthday.
BTW many ukranians was in top of Stalin's leadership. Whom conveyed and fulfilled his orders.
25 posted on 12/26/2003 4:32:53 PM PST by RusIvan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson