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The Islamists Have it Wrong
Middle East Quarterly ^ | Summer 2001 | Abdul Hadi Palazzi

Posted on 01/19/2004 8:38:30 AM PST by Voice in your head

Western observers, both among the general public and the media, commonly make the mistake of thinking that Islamism1 is the same as traditional Islam. Even Western researchers describe Islamism as a resurgence of traditional Islam. One researcher describes Islamists as people of the "anthropological tradition";2 in contrast, moderate Sunni Muslims are characterized as those whose faith is mitigated, influenced by syncretism, or diluted by a certain amount of secularization and Westernization.3

But this turns reality upside-down. In fact, Islamists depart in important ways from the Islamic tradition. This is especially apparent in what concerns divine attributes, Islamic law, and Sufism. Indeed, some outstanding traditional Muslim scholars, such as Sheikh Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri4 and Sheikh Ahmad al-‘Alawi,5 see Islamism as a symptom of secularization and as a reshaping of their religion into a modern, ideological totalitarianism.6 It is this view that I myself share, and shall present here.

Subordinating Religion to Politics

The distinction between traditional Islam and Islamism can be seen in many specifics. Tradition says that Islamic jurisprudence can today be practiced according to four legal schools, all of which are legitimate and authoritative; Islamists, by contrast, see the existence of these schools as an obstacle to their concept of Islamic unity. Tradition attributes to the ruler the right to appoint competent scholars as authorized interpreters of the Islamic law; Islamists do not recognize any authority apart from the leaders of their own groups. Tradition makes the authority of a scholar dependent on the possession of written documents of appointment (ijaza) signed by his predecessor;7 Islamists regularly install people bereft of any theological or legal education into positions of Islamic authority. In most cases, then, Islamist leaders are lay persons with little background in Islamic studies.

Another point: Sunnis do not conceive of Islam as an organization dependent on a centralized leadership, Islamists, on the contrary, see their leading militants as the Islamic leadership; thereby cutting out the need to refer to traditional scholars for guidance. Sunni schools arise spontaneously from voluntary contributions and answer local needs; when organizations are created it happens only for practical reasons, without any implication that the leaders of the organizations are ipso facto Islamic authorities. In contrast, Islamist schools result from funding from a centralized administration that pays activists in every part of the world.

Perhaps most important of all is the Islamists' subordination of religion to politics, our main topic here. Khalid Durán notes the distinction between traditional Islam and its political counterfeit by underlining their different understandings of the relationship between religion and politics:

Whether Islamists like the term fundamentalist or not, their understanding of religion resembles that of fundamentalists in other religions. This is not to say that Islamists are more religious or more genuinely Islamic than other Muslims . . . Islamism is a late 20th century totalitarianism. It follows in the wake of fascism and communism, picking up from those and seeking to refine their methods of domination . . .

Few Muslims would deny that political commitment is part of Islamic ethics, but most disagree with the Islamist insistence that there exists a clearly defined "Islamic system," different from all other political systems.8 Islamists draw on modern European models that posit a scientific revolutionary movement, an elitist scheme of ruling society by means of secret cults that act behind the scenes, and a manufacture of consensus by means of propaganda. They reject those aspects of the Islamic tradition that do not fit with this political outlook.

Theirs is, in fact, an extremist ideology; they consider their organizations and militants as custodians of the projects for Islamizing the world, and whoever criticizes them (be he a Muslim or a non-Muslim) is immediately accused of being anti-Islamic, "Islamophobic," and so forth. Unwilling to be ruled by non-Islamist Muslims, Islamists adopt an approach characterized by political supremacism. Their pious rhetoric does not hide the fact that they exploit the religious feelings of their followers to acquire mundane power and enhance their finances. They claim to be vanguard Muslims, integrating faith and politics, but their cardinal concern is holding power themselves and excluding others. Thus, the goal of these radicals is not genuinely religious but political and even totalitarian.

Like other totalitarian ideologies, contemporary Islamism is blindly utopian. It implies a wholesale denial of history; the Islamists’ model of an ideal society is inspired by the idealized image of seventh-century Arabia and an ahistorical view of religion and human development. It is based on anachronistic thinking that rejects modern concepts of pluralism and tolerance. And it ignores a history of Islam that is rich in models of heterogeneous social organization and adaptation to the times.

Two Views of Politics in Islam

The traditional view understands the role of politics in terms of what the Qur’an teaches. It indicates that prophets were sent to humans to teach them truths about God, ethics, ways to achieve prosperity in this world, and beatitude in the hereafter, and to warn about the consequences of injustice and sinfulness.9 A prophet who is called to preach in a stateless milieu has to assume a role of political leadership; this mantle fell on Moses, as it did to Muhammad (peace be upon both of them). Islamic tradition teaches that when this happens, the two roles are combined by accident; political leadership is not a necessary element of the prophetic mission. By way of confirmation, note that the Qur’an uses different titles to describe the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) but none of them refers to his political function. Verses 33:45-46 say that he was sent as a witness (shahid), a bearer of glad tidings (mubashshir), a warner (nadhir), as someone who calls to God (da‘i ila Allah), and as a shining light (siraj munir). Nowhere does it say he was sent as a political leader or a head of state. That the Prophet Muhammad actually had a political role resulted from the social conditions that prevailed in his time, but this was not a necessary part of his prophetic mission.

Islamists, however, have a very different interpretation. For them, building an Islamic state is the central achievement of the prophetic mission.10 Conflating the role of the Muslim scholar with that of a political leader, they hold that the spread of Islam cannot be separated from the creation of what they call the Islamic state.

They argue that "Islam is both religion and government" (al-Islam din wa dawla);11 and this serves the basic description of their creed. They neglect to mention, however, that this expression is found in neither the Qur’an, the Hadith (sayings and doings of the Prophet Muhammad), or in any other of the authoritative Islamic sources. The slogan was in fact coined by Ibn Taymiya (1263–1328), an extremist scholar who became a staunch supporter of anthropomorphic theology and of extreme literalism in the understanding of the Qur’an, and was heartily criticized by most of the Sunni theologians and jurists of his time.12

Two Views of Jihad

In similar fashion, the Islamists deform the meaning of jihad. In traditional Islam, military jihad and all other forms of material jihad constitute only the external aspect of jihad, while the inner dimension of jihad is the struggle that a Muslim undertakes to purify his soul from mundane desires, defects, and egotism. Jihad is not limited to the military arena but denotes striving hard toward a worthy goal. According to some sayings of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), "the best jihad for women is performing a valid pilgrimage,"13 while "the jihad for someone who has elderly parents is taking care of them."14 According to a well-known tradition, after coming back from a military expedition, the Prophet Muhammad said, "We have returned from the lesser jihad to the greater jihad" (raja‘na min jihad al-asghar ila jihad al-akbar). The Prophet was asked, "O, Messenger of Allah, what is the greater jihad?" He answered, "It is the jihad against one's soul."15 Sunni scholars have always quoted this narration as a means of explaining the inner dimension of jihad. Sufis, in particular, have quoted it as a corrective against a limited, physical understanding of the nature of jihad.

The traditional understanding also includes a military meaning but military jihad is strictly regulated by rules concerning its purpose, means, and resolution.

(Excerpt) Read more at meforum.org ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: islam; islamists; wahhabi
This was written prior to 9/11, before most people had ever heard of Wahhabi or the term "islamist". But, it pointed out the incompatability of Wahhabi lunacy and the existence of western civilization.
1 posted on 01/19/2004 8:38:31 AM PST by Voice in your head
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To: Voice in your head
I wish a lot more Moslems thiought the way this person does.
2 posted on 01/19/2004 8:47:59 AM PST by Unam Sanctam
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To: Voice in your head
Western observers, both among the general public and the media, commonly make the mistake of thinking that Islamism1 is the same as traditional Islam. Even Western researchers describe Islamism as a resurgence of traditional Islam.

Some people remember history, and specifically, The Crusades. They were battles against extremist Islam. This article is whitewash.

3 posted on 01/19/2004 8:50:35 AM PST by SunStar (Democrats piss me off!)
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To: SunStar
Congratulations on making it all the way to the end of the first sentence of the article.
4 posted on 01/19/2004 8:55:46 AM PST by Voice in your head ("The secret of Happiness is Freedom, and the secret of Freedom, Courage." - Thucydides)
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To: Voice in your head
Of course, the media will not fete this guy as a celebrity the way they do with jihadi-apologist Ibrahim Hooper of CAIR.
5 posted on 01/19/2004 8:59:21 AM PST by BenR2 ((John 3:16: Still True Today.))
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To: Voice in your head
Congratulations on making it all the way to the end of the first sentence of the article.

Thanks. I also read the entire article, and though I respect Islamic people who think their religion is peaceful, I can use history and my own perceptions to make a more accurate judgement.

6 posted on 01/19/2004 9:00:35 AM PST by SunStar (Democrats piss me off!)
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To: Voice in your head
The Wahabis and the Islamists are, of course, both hypocrites.

According to the terms agreed to in Islam, they should both kill each other.

In fact, it is Osama Bin Laden's ambition (as an Islamist) to eliminate the House of Saud (the Wahabis).

The guy is too stupid to do the job, however, having thought the route to success ran through the World Trade Center.

7 posted on 01/19/2004 9:02:29 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah
The Wahabis and the Islamists are, of course, both hypocrites. According to the terms agreed to in Islam, they should both kill each other.

The Wahabis ARE Islamists. They are just the oldest branch, and have been thoroughly "corrupted" by the power and money they have gotten from their alliance with the Saudi government.

Osama has no real doctrinal disagreements with the Wahabbi establishment in SA. He just thinks his group should replace theirs becauuse they have become corrupted by contact with the West.

8 posted on 01/19/2004 9:06:25 AM PST by Restorer
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To: Restorer

9 posted on 01/19/2004 9:29:09 AM PST by Voice in your head ("The secret of Happiness is Freedom, and the secret of Freedom, Courage." - Thucydides)
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To: SunStar
The Crusades. They were battles against extremist Islam

How so?
10 posted on 01/19/2004 9:40:49 AM PST by Valin (We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.)
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To: Voice in your head
Good one.
11 posted on 01/19/2004 9:44:41 AM PST by Restorer
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To: SunStar
The Crusades were a very complicated series of events. They don't fit neatly into this idea, though.

Atrocities committed against pilgrims in the Holy Land and threats against Constantinople were the two proximate causes of the Crusades. Both were a result of the conquest of the Middle East by Turkish tribes, many of whom were at best marginally Muslim. They were barbaric and motivated mostly by desire for plunder. They treated Christians who came into their power essentially as they treated Muslims who weren't part of their tribe. Badly. As did the earlier Huns, Scythians and Magyars, who were not even vaguely religious in their motivation.

In a very broad sense the Crusades were a counter-attack against Islam. But they were a several centuries delayed counter-attack.

In their aspect of holy war against the enemies of God, they were an incorporation of the Muslim idea of jihad into Christianity. Probably took a couple of centuries to take hold, since it is just a dramatically unChristian concept.
12 posted on 01/19/2004 9:52:28 AM PST by Restorer
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To: Voice in your head
bttt
13 posted on 01/19/2004 9:53:46 AM PST by lainde (Heads up...We're coming and we've got tongue blades!!)
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To: Restorer
This is going to be unpopular here, but the Crusades were ALSO a land-grab, an excuse for plunder, and a way for some european rulers or the Pope to get RID of inconveiniant people. ( He's after your crown? Send him on Crusade! ) People justify all SORTS of things in the name of religeon, and the Church's hands are not as pristine as they might be.

Tia

14 posted on 01/19/2004 10:11:46 AM PST by tiamat ("Just a Bronze-Age Gal, Trapped in a Techno World!")
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To: tiamat
Not unpopular with me. :)

You're absolutely correct. However, there has never been any war that was fought with unmixed motives. That some Crusaders fought just for themselves does not change the fact that some fought for high ideals, and probably the vast majority fought for both in varying mixtures.
15 posted on 01/19/2004 11:09:04 AM PST by Restorer
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To: Restorer
Oh sure. Some of them WERE in the Crusades because they believed that it was the right thing to do.

I just get impatient with people who paint ALL things done in the name of Christianity as all good, and EVERYTHING Muslim as completly and totally evil.

I got fed up with religeon years ago because of that sort of attitude and pray on my own time and privately as a result!

Tia

16 posted on 01/19/2004 11:30:35 AM PST by tiamat ("Just a Bronze-Age Gal, Trapped in a Techno World!")
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To: Voice in your head
I wonder, have we yet realized that Pali mothers are practicing the same sort of thing the dnc worships--abortion--but doing it a bit later in gestation and in a way to make war against not only their children but their self-proclaimed enemies?
17 posted on 01/19/2004 11:38:10 AM PST by MHGinTN (If you can read this, you've had life support from someone. Promote life support for others.)
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To: tiamat
No problem here.

A great deal of evil has been done in the name of the Cross and the Crescent, both.

The difference is that those following the Cross have mellowed, and (some of) those following the Crescent have gotten more virulent.

How many people have been killed in the last century by Christians for specifically religious reasons? Darn few, especially when compared to the 100M+ in the same timeframe by the various anti-Christian ideologies (Nazi, Commie, Islamist, etc.).
18 posted on 01/19/2004 12:35:51 PM PST by Restorer
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To: Restorer
What scares me is that the Islamists are REALLY pushing for a religeous war.

They do not seeem to understand that IF they get their wish, and IF they get a "Crusade", it will likely result in Islam being wiped off the face of the planet save for a very few very small communities.
If it happens, a bunch of people on BOTH sides who do not need it will be slaughtered, because we really cannot afford to spend time sorting them out.

The Moderate Muslims had better get a clue fast and bring their errant "brothers" to heel!

I consider Wahabism to be a nihilistic death-cult and it may bring down the whole thing.

Tia

19 posted on 01/19/2004 12:47:06 PM PST by tiamat ("Just a Bronze-Age Gal, Trapped in a Techno World!")
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To: tiamat
You did hear why there are no Arabs on Star Trek, didn't you?

It takes place in the future, and we haven't played cowboys and Arabs yet.

It striked me as much like those (thankfully few and isolated) blacks who try to provoke a race war in America.

Don't they realize what would happen to their side if they succeded in getting the war they want?
20 posted on 01/19/2004 12:51:20 PM PST by Restorer
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To: Restorer
I DID hear that and I liked it! Thank you for reminding me!

I agree regarding the race war, BTW.

Tia

21 posted on 01/19/2004 1:01:15 PM PST by tiamat ("Just a Bronze-Age Gal, Trapped in a Techno World!")
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To: Voice in your head
Craig Winn, author of the book Prophet Of Doom:

"There is but one Islam, a singular correct view of Muhammad, his religion, and his god. It is the one found in the Qur’an and Hadith. There is no independent record of Muhammad in history from which a variant view may be drawn. The Hadith and Qur’an are the sole repository of information on this man, his times, means, and mission. The Muhammad of Islam, the god of Islam, and the religion of Islam must be as these sources present them. Prophet of Doom is dedicated to exposing Islam’s scriptures and what Muhammad had to say about himself, his ambition, religion, and god.

Islam rises and falls on Muhammad. He is the doctrine’s sole prophet, its lone founder, its god’s singular conduit. Yet the picture the Islamic scriptures paint is not flattering. I analyzed the five most holy Islamic books and spent two years studying Muhammad and his message. What I found was bone chilling. The depiction of the prophet by the most revered Muslim sources is horrendous. Nearly every page reveals behavior that is immoral, criminal, and violent. The five oldest and most trusted Islamic sources don’t portray Muhammad as a great and godly man. They reveal that he was a thief, liar, assassin, mass murderer, terrorist, warmonger, and an unrestrained sexual pervert engaged in pedophilia, incest, and rape. He authorized deception, assassinations, torture, slavery, and genocide. He was a pirate, not a prophet. According to the Hadith and the Qur’an, Muhammad and his henchmen plundered their way to power and prosperity. And by putting the Qur’an in chronological order and correlating it with the context of Muhammad’s life as it was reported in the Sira, Sunnah and Hadith, we also find that Allah mirrored his prophet’s character. Muhammad’s god condoned immoral and criminal behavior. Allah boasts about being a terrorist. He claims to have deceived men, to have stolen their property, to have enslaved women and children, to having committed acts of murder, genocide, and sadistic tortures..."

http://www.prophetofdoom.net/
22 posted on 01/19/2004 1:02:24 PM PST by OK
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To: Restorer
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/838470/posts
23 posted on 01/19/2004 4:59:08 PM PST by Voice in your head ("The secret of Happiness is Freedom, and the secret of Freedom, Courage." - Thucydides)
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