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Georgia Kept Adding to Crime Database
http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp?id=9113&siteSection=1 ^

Posted on 01/31/2004 6:37:39 AM PST by Stew Padasso

Georgia Kept Adding to Crime Database

............

DICK PETTYS The Associated Press

ATLANTA (AP) _ In a crisply worded statement last October, Gov. Sonny Perdue said he was ending Georgia's participation in a multi-state crime database that tracks the personal details even of law-abiding citizens.

Yet several months later, the state still was pumping information into the database. Top Georgia law enforcement officials even attended a meeting of its members _ two weeks after Perdue's announcement.

State participation appeared to come to an end _ again _ on Friday when the administration, confronted with documents obtained by The Associated Press, said they were now pulling the plug for certain.

``We thought it already had (ended),'' said Dan McLagan, the governor's communications director. ``There was a miscommunication.''

Orders were given Friday to terminate the state's participation, he said.

The multistate database, known as Matrix _ short for the Multistate Anti-Terrorism Information Exchange _ combines records submitted by the participating states with 20 billion database files held by a private Florida company called Seisint Inc.

Launched with $12 billion in federal funds in a response to the Sept. 11 attacks, it has been billed as a speedy way for law enforcement agencies to find records.

Privacy rights advocates are concerned about the inclusion of information on people not accused of crimes, as well as over the scope of the data, which could include marriage and divorce records and even fingerprints.

Georgia law enforcement officials were interested in the project when it was initially proposed and provided state sex offender and prison records for the database.

But last October, Perdue said the state was dropping out of the database. His announcement came after state Attorney General Thurbert Baker ruled the state could not share driver's license records with the database unless state law was changed.

``The state of Georgia will not transfer any additional information to the company responsible for the Matrix database,'' Perdue said in a statement issued Oct. 21 by his press office.

``I have held serious concerns about the privacy issues involved with this project all along, and have decided it is in the best interest of the people of Georgia that our state have no further participation in the Matrix pilot project.''

But records obtained by the AP under a public records request in Florida show that five Georgia Bureau of Investigation agents, including Director Vernon Keenan, attended a Nov. 5 meeting of the Matrix board of directors in Atlanta.

Minutes of the meeting show that Keenan told other participants that Georgia planned to continue sending data to the system, even though that appeared to contradict the governor's earlier announcement.

``Mr. Keenan stated he clarified with the Georgia governor that the state is still participating in the project and is sending the data,'' according to the minutes.

Asked about the apparent contradiction, GBI spokesman John Bankhead said the agency asked Perdue's chief operating officer, Jim Lientz, how to proceed after the governor's Oct. 21 statement.

``We were told to continue as we had in the past but not with the additional data (drivers' licenses),'' he said.

McLagan said that was a ``miscommunication'' between Lientz and the GBI.

``We wanted participation to end immediately,'' McLagan said. ``We have clarified that with the GBI and they are terminating their remaining participation in the program.''

Still in the program are Connecticut, Florida, Michigan, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Utah's governor on Thursday halted that state's participation in the database. Gov. Olene Walker promised to look more closely at the project, which had been set in motion during her predecessor's administration, after the American Civil Liberties Union said the program poses a more powerful threat to privacy than its organizers acknowledge.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; US: Georgia
KEYWORDS: ga; matrix; privacy

1 posted on 01/31/2004 6:37:39 AM PST by Stew Padasso
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To: Stew Padasso
More erosion of personal freedom in the name of 'law enforcement'
2 posted on 01/31/2004 6:40:37 AM PST by cyborg
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To: Stew Padasso
It amazes me these articles don't get more comments.
3 posted on 01/31/2004 6:43:14 AM PST by Prodigal Son
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To: Prodigal Son
you have a point
4 posted on 01/31/2004 6:47:05 AM PST by cyborg
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To: Prodigal Son
They rarely exceed ten posts.
5 posted on 01/31/2004 6:47:49 AM PST by Stew Padasso (Head down over a saddle.)
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To: Stew Padasso
And I don't know why. This is a serious issue.
6 posted on 01/31/2004 6:49:11 AM PST by Prodigal Son
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To: Prodigal Son
Because saying this is wrong, makes one a accessory to terrorism. Don't you know after 9-11 the government has the right to tell you what color underpants to put on??
7 posted on 01/31/2004 6:52:04 AM PST by cyborg
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To: Prodigal Son
It leaves me to believe that either people don't care, the topic is boring, or they agree with the measures taken by our elected officials.
8 posted on 01/31/2004 6:53:53 AM PST by Stew Padasso (Head down over a saddle.)
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To: Prodigal Son
Do you honestly think the data base is shut down? This is a treasure for the law enforcement, and government, a back door most likely has already been opened with information continuing to flow.
9 posted on 01/31/2004 6:56:03 AM PST by duk
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To: duk
Do you honestly think the data base is shut down?

Is that rhetorical? I haven't said I believe the system is shut down.

10 posted on 01/31/2004 6:58:59 AM PST by Prodigal Son
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To: Stew Padasso
all your post are belonging to us
11 posted on 01/31/2004 6:59:30 AM PST by teeman8r
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To: Stew Padasso
My vote is apathy.
12 posted on 01/31/2004 6:59:50 AM PST by Prodigal Son
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To: Prodigal Son
Just read an article farther down on FR about business's who have massive databases that our "uncle" can access. The government only has to put together a system to reach all these business data bases.

I was not being rhetorical about you, but rather the general public who will be reading this article.
13 posted on 01/31/2004 7:03:38 AM PST by duk
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To: cyborg
Because saying this is wrong, makes one a accessory to terrorism.

You know, I really dislike Ted Rall (cartoonist) but yesterday (or the day before) he had a 'toon I actually liked. It depicted a guy noticing a suspicious bag on the subway. He thought about reporting it but then he realized he would be grilled by the Feds for hours (if not days) and be accused of being a terrorist so he just left it unreported and went on his merry way.

14 posted on 01/31/2004 7:04:13 AM PST by Prodigal Son
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To: teeman8r
believing that such databases are non-existant is folly in the hearts of american citizens... bureaucrats and alphabetical agencies are accumulating en masse information on every individual who uses a credit card... from financial expenditures to where and when one traverses freely this great nation...

i may wear the dreaded tinfoil hat of conspiratists everywhere, but make no mistake, those who step out of line and are bumped by this government search program will be posted for surveillance by the man...

fortunately, government lacks efficiency and motivation and most toadies would rather spend the time they are supposed to be watching the flock, in a strip club off the interstate...


teeman8r
15 posted on 01/31/2004 7:05:22 AM PST by teeman8r (my tinfoil hat made my hair fallout... i believe there is a conspiracy there somewhere)
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To: Stew Padasso; JohnGalt; 4ConservativeJustices; stainlessbanner; Ff--150; sheltonmac
``We thought it already had (ended),'' said Dan McLagan, the governor's communications director. ``There was a miscommunication.''

No, you just didn't think anyone was paying attention. Standard politician. Say you're going to do something about it, talk it up a bit, and then just go on business as usual hoping no one notices. And sadly this is how this nation of states is run today. We hear a fiery speech from 'our' guy and contrary to all factual evidence contrary to what was said in the speech, we're expected to continue to believe the speech because 'our' guy said it. And any who dare question the facts are ostracized as supposedly never having supported the politician in the first place

Looks like Sonny's camp just keeps on keeping on.

16 posted on 01/31/2004 7:10:00 AM PST by billbears (Deo Vindice.)
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To: Stew Padasso; Southack
``The state of Georgia will not transfer any additional information to the company responsible for the Matrix database,'' Perdue said in a statement issued Oct. 21 by his press office. ``I have held serious concerns about the privacy issues involved with this project all along, and have decided it is in the best interest of the people of Georgia that our state have no further participation in the Matrix pilot project.''

Sonny Perdue is my kind of Republican.

Southack, you've made it clear you don't think privacy is a right. Perhaps it's not. But I believe not abrogating privacy is a responsibility of government.

17 posted on 01/31/2004 7:13:17 AM PST by Lazamataz
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To: teeman8r
I have been delaying my ccw application for almost 2 months, because my tin foil cap chafes me every time I think about my "NAME, WEAPON TYPE, ADDRESS, VEHICLE, ECT." being tied to that ccw. It is a red flag that brings all this information and more to the alphebet soup agencies attention.

The completed packet sits on my desk, staring at me, like something out of "1984."
18 posted on 01/31/2004 7:14:01 AM PST by duk
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To: Stew Padasso
``We thought it already had (ended),'' said Dan McLagan, the governor's communications director. ``There was a miscommunication.''

In other words, ``We thought it already had (ended),'' said Dan McLagan, the governor's communications director. ``But the people involved in the data-base operation weren't careful enough to make it look as though it had ended and they got caught. So now, for sure, it'll look as though it's been stopped.''
19 posted on 01/31/2004 7:19:28 AM PST by aruanan
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To: cyborg
Well, we want to be safe don't we? It's only being used in the War on Terror™. Or do you secretly support the terrorists? What are you, a *subversive democrap?

* Warning: The term "subversive democrap" should be reserved for emergency situations only. It is intended for use only as a last resort. Overuse of this powerful tool may lead to diminished effectiveness and possible addiction.
20 posted on 01/31/2004 7:43:23 AM PST by kenth (This is not a tagline. You, sir, are hallucinating.)
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To: Stew Padasso
bump.
21 posted on 01/31/2004 7:47:54 AM PST by sunshine state
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To: kenth
as long as I'm not in the same group as ted kennedy!
22 posted on 01/31/2004 7:52:37 AM PST by cyborg
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To: Prodigal Son
Hi again,
What most people don't realize is that databases have been around for over 30 years.
I am very familiar with data collected by Equifax etc. Whenever I hired someone, he/she was checked through the agency. Interesting stuff comes out.
Another database is MIB, also located in Atlanta. This Bureau is collecting data on medical information that will be accessed if you purchase Life Ins., Health Ins. , etc.
Whenever you go to the doctor and an Insurance claim is submitted, it is stored in the Database.
Those are private companies, not the Government. It seems to me that the Government could save a lot of money if they just get a law passed being allowed to access that data, rather than develop a duplicate system?
By the way, this has nothing to do with whether I approve of this or not. I am not voicing an opinion, so people don't write back and tell me about what an idiot I am for going along.
It is just meant as Information.
23 posted on 01/31/2004 8:45:27 AM PST by americanbychoice
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To: Prodigal Son
It amazes me these articles don't get more comments.

That's because there are too many people who think a. that if everything is controlled then nothing bad can happen, b. that if everything is controlled it won't negatively affect them because they're not doing anything bad, and c. that even if whatever the proposed measure is doesn't fully control everything bad, at least it shows those who proposed it were sincerely trying. And, really, can we ask anything more than that people sincerely try or, at the very least, intend to do something ostensibly good?

All the while the poor bozos forget what the founding fathers said about the government as an untrustworthy servant--it is necessary for some things, but is certainly not to be given the run of the house.

It's been over two centuries since the founding of our country, but people still want to use mechanisms of societal and governmental power to further their own ends. That hasn't changed. But the level of naivete on the part of the masses seems to have grown. And with it have increased both the likelihood and scope of oppression when people in the government encourage the creation of truly dual-use mechanisms of control by stressing to the naive citizenry how safe it'll keep them from the bogeyman that threatens from without but says that they shouldn't worry about the possibility of oppression from the government types who are already here and who've designed the systems of control because this is the USA and their hearts are pure.

When there is only intent toward an evil end, but limited or no means to effect it, the threat posed by that end is limited or non-existent. But to the degree that a means is provided, to that degree the end is made more certain. The creation of these means of control, though, and their availability, together with constant factor of human corruption, vastly increases the likelihood of oppression. We may hear that "safeguards" have been put into place. Yeah, but when those doing the safeguarding are the very same folks who, after someone like Clinton was impeached, collectively got down on their senatorial knees before him because they--like Monica and others--judged that letting the matter--like his pants--drop was better for their own individual careers, you know that safety from abuse by government cannot be guaranteed by government.

Present day government at all levels has at its disposal an information and tracking system and firepower that makes anything used by the Gestapo and the Kremlin look medieval in comparison. The only reason things aren't as oppressive at the personal level as they were under the Nazis or Communists is not because the means don't exist but simply because no one has dared use them in a widespread, systematic way.
24 posted on 01/31/2004 8:47:46 AM PST by aruanan
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To: americanbychoice
It is just meant as Information

To be used for good or not so good.
This is where someone says "if you've nothing wrong then there(their) is nothing to(too) fear".

25 posted on 01/31/2004 8:50:56 AM PST by babaloo999 (Zionist troll since 2001)
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To: aruanan
Good comments. Thanks.

You'd still think this would be one of those fire-storm issues here at FR.

If it were gun control or immigration, you'd easily see two or three hundred comments.
26 posted on 01/31/2004 9:03:40 AM PST by Prodigal Son
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To: Prodigal Son
If it were gun control or immigration, you'd easily see two or three hundred comments.

Oh, it relates to gun control, just one step removed. Too many people have already been suckered into believing that the purpose of the Second Amendment was to make sure they could have a gun to hunt with and, maybe, protect themselves from crime.
27 posted on 01/31/2004 9:21:25 AM PST by aruanan
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To: aruanan
The one thing a government,(any size or from any time) hates, is a people who have the means to control the governing authority.

...that whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these Ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolishi it, and to institute new Government, laying its Foundation on such principles..
28 posted on 01/31/2004 9:40:04 AM PST by duk
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To: duk
...that whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these Ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolishi it, and to institute new Government, laying its Foundation on such principles..

And this leads back to the primary theme of the founders: government is to come from the consent of the governed within the context of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution; if those in office reject the will of the governed, they can be voted out of office and replaced with someone who will uphold and defend the Constitution; if voting out of office isn't sufficient to rein in the abuse by a government that has turned its back on the Constitution, then force must be met with force in order to reestablish a constitutional government that will ensure the peoples' liberty; and the credible threat of force inherent in the people is a deterrent to the sort of oppression that would make the exercise of force necessary.

As several founding fathers said, antedating by almost two centuries Mao's dictum about power being found in the barrel of a gun, an armed citizenry safeguards its liberty by making those in the government afraid to attempt to wrest it from them. And, like Tom Daschle, I'm truly saddened that so many nowadays look on this wisdom of the founding fathers, gained through immediate, practical experience, as a threat to the current state of affairs. But, if perceived as a threat, this only illustrates how far from the ideals of the founding the current state of affairs has drifted.
29 posted on 01/31/2004 10:01:42 AM PST by aruanan
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To: billbears
Looks like Sonny's camp just keeps on keeping on.

It does seem like there is a disconnect between Perdue and his staff/party.

"We wanted participation to end immediately," McLagan said. "We have clarified that with the GBI and they are terminating their remaining participation in the program."

Should have never participated to begin with.

30 posted on 01/31/2004 10:10:31 AM PST by 4CJ (||) Support free speech and stop CFR - visit www.ArmorforCongress.com (||)
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