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U.S. Tech Workers Bear Brunt of Immigration Policy
Fox News ^ | April 29, 2004 | Matt Hayes

Posted on 04/29/2004 9:17:16 AM PDT by looscnnn

In April, 2003, Kevin Flanagan, a computer programmer with Bank of America (search), was fired from his job after being forced to train his replacement, an Indian worker who was taking over Flanagan's job as part of Bank of America's effort to replace its American workforce with foreign labor.

Flanagan walked outside into his office parking lot and shot himself to death.

A year later, it's no surprise that the impact of foreign labor (search) on American workers has become a potent political issue this campaign season. What Americans need to understand is how complicit the U.S. government has been in helping large corporations secure cheap foreign labor, and the impact that has had not just on American workers, but on the foreign laborers doing their jobs for a fraction of their wages.

----Snip-----

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: aliens; foreign; h1b; immigrantlist; immigration; l1; labor; visa
In 2000, with the economy entering a full recession, America imported 650,263 foreign workers under two employer-friendly visa programs, H-1B (search) and L-1 (search). In 2001, with the economy still struggling and the tech industry laying off 500,000 American workers, Congress responded to heavy lobbying by business interests by signing off on another 712, 671 employment-related visas for the year -- a surge of nearly 10 percent in labor imports.

Even a 2002 report by the undersecretary for technology at the Department of Commerce, which found that several years of data did not support the IT industry lobbyists’ claims of a critical worker shortage, could not stop Congress from issuing another 684,189 H-1B and L-1 visas that year.

The flood continued into 2003. As top-dollar lobbyists made the rounds on Capitol Hill with the story that technology corporations couldn't find American computer programmers (and those corporations dumped money into Washington -- $201 million in 2000 alone), American IT workers across the country were being laid off.

And while some members of Congress, fresh from depositing their campaign contribution checks, were justifying their pro-industry votes with the industry line that Americans -- the people who invented computers -- were just too lacking in skills to program them, story after story emerged of middle-aged American IT workers fired and replaced with 25-year-old foreign nationals.

As a final indignity, these American workers -- many with families, American mortgages to pay, and college tuitions to save -- are often required to train their own replacements in order to receive their desperately needed severance packages.

Since Congress raised the H-1b visa cap in 2000, over two million employment-related visas have been issued. But it isn't only Americans who are suffering.

The replacement workers are also often victims. Not only does the foreign replacement worker earn about half what the American he or she replaced did, but Congress lets the worker's American boss control the visa -- ensuring a workforce as compliant as it is cheap. If the foreign worker complains about low wages, unpaid overtime, lack of health care or deplorable living conditions, the boss can yank the visa.

Remarkably, in spite of the number of Americans devastated by the employment visa programs, and despite the fact that the injustices would seem to make scrapping them an easy moral call, some of those in Congress continue to work aggressively to import even higher numbers of both skilled and unskilled foreign workers.

Rep. Chris Cannon, R-Utah, has in many ways taken the leadership role in increasing immigration (a role he took from former Michigan Sen. Spencer Abraham, whose immigration policies played a major role in his 2000 defeat.) The Washington Post has called Cannon the "point man" in Congress for Bush administration efforts to push for an illegal aliens amnesty

In an October 2000 press release titled “Cannon Manages House Passage of High Tech Visa Bill," Rep. Cannon took credit for passing the American Competitiveness in the Twenty-First Century Act of 2000 (search), the very act that marked the onset of the current flood.

In the four years since the passage of the bill, stories like Kevin Flanagan's don't seem to have dampened enthusiasm. This year, Cannon has signed on to several bills that would increase immigration, and introduced a couple of his own. His AgJOBS bill (search), which is both a massive new amnesty for illegal aliens and a major new guest worker program, has drawn the enthusiastic endorsement of some four hundred groups and organizations -- overwhelmingly business interests. His efforts have earned him awards of appreciation from immigration lawyers' interests and ethnic-identity organizations.

As the impact on Americans grows more severe, however, a political backlash becomes increasingly likely. Even cynical veterans of the anti-H-1b wars, who for years have been resigned to the influence of corporate interests in American politics, are beginning to talk about real signs of a major shift.

Chris Cannon is at the center of much of this talk. Once considered one of the safest Republicans in Congress -- a 10-year incumbent in the most Republican district of the most Republican state in the country--Cannon's history on immigration issues has become a political hot potato in Utah. One of his challengers, Matt Throckmorton (search), an up-and-coming former state legislator, has been a long-time critic of Cannon's immigration policies and his message has struck home. Cannon has been forced into either defending his amnesty bills (a policy opposed by four out of five Americans), or flat out denying he supports amnesties (which his record makes impossible).

Meanwhile, a disgruntled former IT worker has gathered compelling evidence of what appears to be questionable financial arrangements between Cannon and those who profit by his cheap labor votes in Congress. Salt Lake City's Deseret News printed a letter from the worker detailing the evidence, which was picked up by the RescueAmericanJobs Web site. On Monday, the former IT worker filed a formal ethics complaint.

Nevertheless, it remains to be seen whether any of this will result in change in Washington.

Yet somewhere in America, a middle-aged American will be training his replacement how to do his job at half the cost, and wondering what will happen to his family once the severance money runs out. As he cleans out his desk, another group of smart, young lobbyists in thousand-dollar suits will be telling some member of Congress how their client, an IT giant, has really, really tried to find an American who can program computers.

Matt Hayes began practicing immigration law shortly after graduating from Pace University School of Law in 1994, representing new immigrants in civil and criminal matters. He is the author of The New Immigration Law and Practice, to be published in October.

1 posted on 04/29/2004 9:17:16 AM PDT by looscnnn
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To: looscnnn
Hey, one can always get a job helping these folks get visas to come to the US!
2 posted on 04/29/2004 9:18:49 AM PDT by thoughtomator (yesterday Kabul, today Baghdad, tomorrow Damascus)
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To: looscnnn
"As top-dollar lobbyists made the rounds on Capitol Hill with the story that technology corporations couldn't find American computer programmers (and those corporations dumped money into Washington -- $201 million in 2000 alone), American IT workers across the country were being laid off."

Time to start taking these people to task.
3 posted on 04/29/2004 9:19:50 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: looscnnn
Flanagan walked outside into his office parking lot and shot himself to death.

*** Killing oneself over a jobloss... how sad. I knew a lady who worked in Citibank for thirty years. She was an older black lady who was forced to train a younger, white and underqualified college grad who had an atttitude. She resigned instead of training him. At first she was upset but then she got a job paying her three times as much.
4 posted on 04/29/2004 9:20:21 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: thoughtomator
Nah, you would have to hold a H-1B or L-1 visa to get the job.
5 posted on 04/29/2004 9:20:48 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: looscnnn
Sounds like Utahans need to make an example of Mr Cannon.
6 posted on 04/29/2004 9:24:31 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: *immigrant_list; A Navy Vet; Lion Den Dan; Free the USA; Libertarianize the GOP; madfly; B4Ranch; ..
ping
7 posted on 04/29/2004 9:24:38 AM PDT by gubamyster
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To: looscnnn
The WSJ today, page one, has a story with the headline, "Tech Jobs Start to Come Back In US After Three-Year Slump."

With the business upturn, IT and Tech will have some rebound. You can't outsource time critical jobs or repairs, so US tech workers will get more jobs.
8 posted on 04/29/2004 9:25:49 AM PDT by RicocheT
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To: cyborg
I agree that it was sad. Good for the lady. However, one thing should be noted:

"As a final indignity, these American workers -- many with families, American mortgages to pay, and college tuitions to save -- are often required to train their own replacements in order to receive their desperately needed severance packages."

Refuse to train/quit and no severance. Best thing to do would to train, but do a crappy job and then you get the severance and they get paid back with a bad visa holder.
9 posted on 04/29/2004 9:26:02 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: looscnnn
exactly... If it was me, I'd hold out as long as possible. I can't imagine anything more galling than training your replacement under any circumstance. I really feel the people in these situations. When you're training people, you really have to look over your shoulder these days.
10 posted on 04/29/2004 9:28:03 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: looscnnn
Americans shouldn't be too concerned with H-1B and L-1 employees. Not only are they perfectly legal in this country, but the vast majority of these visaholders are highly qualified and multilingual professionals. On the other hand, the hordes of illegal immigrants are the ones who are putting a downward pressure on blue-collar wages.
11 posted on 04/29/2004 9:28:16 AM PDT by Bismarck
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To: skeeter
I said that some time ago, I had posted an article all about him and what he has been doing/saying. If he spreads his disease and infects the rest of the GOP, you can bet that there will be no more GOP administrations.
12 posted on 04/29/2004 9:28:44 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: Bismarck
Way down is that downward pressure... I wonder how successful outfits like Labor Ready are with the all illegals glutting the market.
13 posted on 04/29/2004 9:29:49 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: cyborg
Both are true. Yet do not deny that such job losses brought about by wholesale bribery and greedy self-dealing in affairs very nigh to bribery of our US Congress -- bribery by foreign interests, and by US citizens more interested in money from foreigners or to be made through foreigners and callous to and deliberately ignorant of the interests of their brothers, neighbors and countrymen, that such job losses to each afflicted and injured citizen are not capable of causing such aggraved despair that broken families, sickness and suicide are the results

The results in greater number than a change to a new, postive job or career? Today -- YES.

14 posted on 04/29/2004 9:30:20 AM PDT by bvw
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To: RicocheT
True, but they can import the workers for those jobs. That is what this article is about. I would like to see Americans getting the priority when it comes to the jobs. To say that there are no American programmers, etc. so they can import cheap labor is pure BS.
15 posted on 04/29/2004 9:31:34 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: bvw
Your point is well taken... I just think it's sad what he did, that he felt things were so bad he shot himself.
16 posted on 04/29/2004 9:33:44 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: Bismarck
"Perfectly legit"

No, not "perfectly legit" -- not legit in most part. Unexamined by authorities, promoted by the greased palms of Congress, yes. The lies abound in applications for H1-B and L1. And the allowances for such is achieved by bribe and near-bribe to Congress and trade councils.

17 posted on 04/29/2004 9:35:17 AM PDT by bvw
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To: Bismarck
I know that they are here legally and well educated/qualified, but to replace workers that are doing the job so that you can get someone to work for half the price because "there are no Americans that can do the job" is pure BS. I understand trying to cut costs, but lying about lack of workers is wrong.

I agree with you on illegals.
18 posted on 04/29/2004 9:36:02 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: cyborg
Good for her.
Unless you are making this up - I am proud of her.
19 posted on 04/29/2004 9:38:02 AM PDT by traumer
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To: looscnnn; EveningStar; Bella_Bru; Guvmint_Cheese; Polonius
They Took Our Jobs!
20 posted on 04/29/2004 9:38:50 AM PDT by Phantom Lord (Distributor of Pain, Your Loss Becomes My Gain)
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To: looscnnn
Agree wholeheartedly... they should be at least intellectually honest. Oh yes btw, in that story I told, the young man was getting paid less as well. A college grad is a lot cheaper than a lifer, and a HB1 employee is a lot cheaper than a college grad... wow some food chain developing.
21 posted on 04/29/2004 9:39:55 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: traumer
No not making it up... the bank branch ended up closing anyway. Carle Place, New York. I can see why she thought it was racial, but another lady was scheduled to get the boot and she was white. She saved them the trouble of dying from cancer :(
22 posted on 04/29/2004 9:42:18 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: thoughtomator
Got laid-off tuesday. (Thank you India). There's quite a few IT jobs available in my practice....but my skill set doesn't match most of the requirments.
Salary is not THE issue. Working is. Not sure I want to enhance my skills, only to see the same thing happening down the road.
Maybe it's time to get out of IT.
23 posted on 04/29/2004 9:48:05 AM PDT by stylin19a (it's only called golf because all the other 4 letter words were taken)
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To: stylin19a
I am in the IT field also. When I was looking for a job, the skill sets that were required in job openings were nuts. They almost all wanted you to have experience with just about everything in IT, even if the job had nothing to do with them.
24 posted on 04/29/2004 9:51:27 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: bvw
Here's a surprise for you. I came to this country with a J-1 and after its expiration I decided to enroll in an MBA program (now I have an F-1). I know a lot of people with H-1B and L-1 visas and they are ALL highly qualified and perfectly fluent in English (unlike Juanito and Conchita who crossed Rio Grande). They are an asset for this country AND a loss for their country of origin. Does the term brain drain ring a bell?
25 posted on 04/29/2004 9:52:51 AM PDT by Bismarck
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To: looscnnn
"There's a new push in Congress to increase by 20,000 the number of foreign workers holding H-1B visas...Most of the H-1Bs that U.S. companies are hiring "are coming out of our own schools"...The bill (was) introduced earlier this month by Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas)...The co-sponsors are all Republican"

Effort afoot to exempt 20k from H-1B cap

26 posted on 04/29/2004 9:54:22 AM PDT by freeeee ("Owning" property in the US just means you have one less landlord)
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To: Bismarck
I agree and the downward pressure on blue collar wages will continue as long as there's this idiotic policy of providing illegals with tax payer supported benefits. As long as labor intensive companies continue to pay a barely livable wage knowing full well the taxpayers are supplementing their worker's living expenses this problem will worsen.
27 posted on 04/29/2004 9:55:43 AM PDT by american spirit
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To: stylin19a
Maybe it's time to get out of IT.

Yeah, basically, that's the story. What corporate thinks it wants from IT, now, is not what IT staff in the US got hired to do, three years back.

Basically, corporate thinks of IT as mechanical work, and doesn't yet understand how pervasive language and cultural barriers actually are, in this particular field. So do something else until (if) they wake up - with a much stronger negotiating hand, once they are fully aware of the reasons they want you.

28 posted on 04/29/2004 10:01:02 AM PDT by thoughtomator (yesterday Kabul, today Baghdad, tomorrow Damascus)
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To: cyborg
Heh, I've got one even better than that. An acquaintance of mine was laid off from his programmer/analyst (really sysadmin) job at a major corp, and was asked to train his replacement. After 12 years of running their systems, and turning what began as an ancient IBM 360 mainframe app into the central hub of a now global Sun network, they actually expected him to teach the entire system to an Indian replacement who barely spoke passable English, and to do so in 45 days. In theory, the training would garner him an $8,000 "severance bonus", but he was basically told that a refusal would result in a bad reference.

He trained the guy, but like he said "you can't pack 12 years of hacks, optimizations, and work arounds into 45 days of training". After he quit, the Indian H1-B brought the system down three times in as many months, each time idling over a thousand workers...the guy finally quit in the middle of the third failure claiming that he "couldn't take the stress of the job". They bounced through three new sysadmins over the following six months, none of whom really understood the intricacies of maintaining data integrity when you're synchronizing seven datacenters on four continents, and eventually outsourced the whole thing after giving up on the idea of an in-house sysadmin. The company that they'd outsourced to declared the whole system "unmanageable, unworkable, and outdated" and recommended that they go through a nearly $10 million dollar "upgrade" to optimize their systems.

At that point, the company came back to him and offered $30,000 for a six month project to fully document the databases and systems that he'd developed so that they could be upgraded by this company. When he returned, he discovered that all of the previous IT management had been fired by a new CIO because of their "inept" handling of the transition, and that everyone involved with his layoff was history. After learning that, he pointed out to the CIO that for $10 million, he could sysadmin the entire system for 100 years at $100,000 a year (he'd only been making $55k a year before being laid off). The CIO accepted on the spot.

So in the end, he got his job back, his paycheck was doubled, and the new CIO was awarded a huge bonus for "saving" the company $10 million bucks.

Now THAT'S what I call mismanagement :-\
29 posted on 04/29/2004 10:09:51 AM PDT by Arthalion
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To: looscnnn
Yet somewhere in America, a middle-aged American will be training his replacement how to do his job at half the cost, and wondering what will happen to his family once the severance money runs out.

This exact thing happened to a friend of ours in San Jose. He was an older, experienced tech worker who had been on the same job for thirty years. He unknowingly trained his lower paid Indian replacement, then the company dumped him. He died a year later from a stroke, probably brought on by the stress of it all. The companies prosper while the employees get the boot. There's no such thing as loyalty anymore.

30 posted on 04/29/2004 10:10:23 AM PDT by janetgreen
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To: Arthalion
Wow they sure learned their lesson. I wonder how many times that same mistake has been repeated by other companies? Wow.
31 posted on 04/29/2004 10:12:58 AM PDT by cyborg
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To: Arthalion
You hit the nail on the head. I trained my replacements. I showed them how to press the buttons and I wrote the documentation for the processes>
How do I tell them what i KNOW and how i KNOW when to do.
The cleint can't swallow their pride, and are mired in various outages...sometimes, the lowest bidder is the lowest bidder for a reason.
32 posted on 04/29/2004 10:16:51 AM PDT by stylin19a (it's only called golf because all the other 4 letter words were taken)
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To: stylin19a
oh good grief !
cleint=client
when to do. = when to do it.
33 posted on 04/29/2004 10:19:21 AM PDT by stylin19a (it's only called golf because all the other 4 letter words were taken)
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To: gubamyster
Bump. Get that college edumacation and go into Data Processing. You'll always have a job. < /sarcasm>
34 posted on 04/29/2004 10:25:45 AM PDT by SAMWolf (War is God's way of teaching us geography)
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To: Phantom Lord
"They took our jobs!"

South Park finally addressed the immigration and H1B abuse problems but weaseled by making the invaders "people from the future" who arrive via Terminator-style time travel. Most of the related issues were hit upon: inability to communicate, undercutting of wages and job displacement, schools caving into demands for bilingual ed, refusal to assimilate, overcrowding, early child care entrusted to strangers because they're cheap; I probably missed a few.

The angered men assembled to find a solution. "They took our jobs!" was garbled a lot but even more ridiculous was their decision to become gay, thus denying the people of the future a future. Eventually Kyle made an impassioned speech convincing everyone to work for a better future for everyone, uniting the disgruntled people into a positive effort, causing the people from the future to fade away because their need to migrate to our era disappeared.

While working in a garden Cartman pointed out that the "united working for a better future" thing was pretty gay. The others agreed, dropped their garden tools and went on with their ordinary lives.

Obviously the two ordinarily bright young writers recognize the ongoing problems but aren't bright enough to imagine anything close to a solution. Sure, it's a silly and often profane comedy, but most of the time Parker and Stone toss a proposal in whenever their show touches on real-life dilemmas. Guess they've made so much money for so long that they've finally achieved becoming out of touch with we commoners.
35 posted on 04/29/2004 11:05:40 AM PDT by NewRomeTacitus
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To: gubamyster
Just another day in congress. Bump!!
36 posted on 04/29/2004 11:09:24 AM PDT by Brownie74
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To: Brownie74
BUMP
37 posted on 04/29/2004 5:42:12 PM PDT by truthkeeper
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To: looscnnn
US Tech Workers Bear Brunt of Immigration Policy

Immigration policy??... I didn't know we had one. It's more like a come one, come all open door to me.

38 posted on 04/29/2004 6:10:07 PM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
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To: cyborg
Your point is well taken... I just think it's sad what he did, that he felt things were so bad he shot himself.
Some people still have pride in their work and a strong attachment to it, which is something very much at odds with the open borders / trade cartel. They believe that the rest of the world owes them something for providing them jobs, as if it is not actaully employees providing them with something tangeable.

39 posted on 04/29/2004 6:43:49 PM PDT by sixmil
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To: Arthalion
Now THAT'S what I call mismanagement :-\

Yes -- the idea that any organization would allow itself to get to the point where it is held hostage by one individual is truly mismanagement. There should be rigorous procedures in place and documentation standards and policies to ensure continuity. What if your "hero" won the lottery? The affect on the enterprise would be the same.

The structure should be in place to allow a talented sysadmin to use his/her creative abilities to create procedures to increase efficiency and effectiveness and then turn it over to a stable operational organization. Anthing less suggests that the individual in question has no sense of dicsipline and doesn't care about the enterprise to which they work. They are just hacks who have been able to take a small amount of knowledge and leverage it to make themselves "indespensible."

I have seen these types of "heros" before in my almost 30 years of IT -- I get them fired as soon as possible since they are mavericks who do more harm than good.

40 posted on 04/29/2004 6:53:27 PM PDT by m87339 (If you could see what a drag it is to be you)
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To: m87339
r/to which they work/for which they work/1
41 posted on 04/29/2004 6:55:30 PM PDT by m87339 (If you could see what a drag it is to be you)
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To: m87339; All
Yes -- the idea that any organization would allow itself to get to the point where it is held hostage by one individual is truly mismanagement. There should be rigorous procedures in place and documentation standards and policies to ensure continuity. What if your "hero" won the lottery? The affect on the enterprise would be the same

G-D!!!,,,

You gotta love it...a Hornhair that thinks that ALL THE DOCUMENTATION IN THE WORLD would replace the Human Element...

Well, a couple of decades ago, I was a 'green and wet behind the ears'...programmer hired during a hostile takeover of a NYC Bank [Hint: during the Panic of 1837, only GOLD, SILVER, and the Banknotes with this peculiar CHEMICAL smell were accepted as Legal Tender by ANYONE in New York!!! ].

The takeover was attempted by a Wall Street Darling...who at the end held a Press Conference declaring..."I always knew there was an Establishment, but until today, I thought I was part of it!"

OK, this little company, bought by the Bank to MONKEYWRENCH the takeover [Hint: The Bank Holding Company Act], now had to perform on its own.

A Young Lady was promised a Severence Package to train me in the FORD MOTOR Account...Three rooms full of Excruciating Detailed DOCUMENTATION!!!

She refused...and wished me luck :-(

figuring it ALL out!!!

Eventually, the Bank...'Old Bullion" [from 1837 Panic], Liquidated the company!!!

ROOMSFULL of Documentation is NO SUBSTITUTE for Institutional Memory!!!

BTW, ALL the Software Company's Big Wigs, transfered to the Bank with the CHEMICAL SMELL...were S**t Canned in less than a Year!!!

42 posted on 04/30/2004 12:20:40 AM PDT by Lael (Patent Law...not a single Supreme Court Justice is qualified to take the PTO Bar Exam!)
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To: Reaganwuzthebest
Sure we do, when it comes to allowing high tech workers. They can't be hidden as easily as low tech illegals.
43 posted on 04/30/2004 7:01:26 AM PDT by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: Lael
A Young Lady was promised a Severence Package to train me in the FORD MOTOR Account...Three rooms full of Excruciating Detailed DOCUMENTATION!!!

Interesting rant although it completely misses the point. You need systems in place to ensure effective management of any operation. Part of that is documentation -- but that documentation only can be used within a context (which clearly was not available to you).

Is this how you work? Is this your expectation? This is the kind of discipline I expect from a grad student or an intern.

You left open the most important part -- what if your friend won the lottery? According to you, the company would fall into an abyss of mass confusion (that is your report on what happened). That is on the company for tolerating such a condition and on your friend for playing the old "keep the info in my head for job security" game -- usually the game I see in government. Like I said, I delight in firing (or arranging for the firing) of people who play that game.

So many people confuse skill -- they can do things --with ability -- delivering value.

I am in the IT profession and I am in great demand. There is 0% probability of my job being outsourced because I bring to the table the experience and understannd of what IT is supposed to do -- and the ability to communcate that and provide context. I am a consultant for a very large company and am constantly turning down work.

Any hack can program -- that is why it is eminently outsourcable. The ability to commmuinicate and make complex technical concepts clear to non-technical decision makers and clients -- how to use IT to solve real life everyday problems, how to differentiate strategic versus tactical plans -- these are the things that cannot be outsourced.

44 posted on 04/30/2004 10:15:59 AM PDT by m87339 (If you could see what a drag it is to be you)
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To: m87339
Who was held hostage? He was perfectly willing to document the software for the $30,000 and be done with it (he was actually in a $75k+ yearly position with another company by that point), but they decided that it was in their best interests to rehire him and keep their IT in-house.

And, IMO, if the company is so worried about portability, they should have probably freed up some budget to have a professional consulting firm put together their global network rather than having their internal IT department, with no previous experience doing this sort of thing, put it together for them. As I said in the first post, these guys started out with a single ancient IBM mainframe and grew it into a global network, and they did so using only their internal resources because management didn't want to spend the money on people with experience doing this sort of thing. When you ask an amateur to design a global network, you get an amateurish global network.

I fault the management, not the programmers.
45 posted on 04/30/2004 1:56:25 PM PDT by Arthalion
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