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Gen. George S. Patton, 80, Son Of World War II Commander, Dies
Earlybird | Jun 30, 04 | Unk

Posted on 06/30/2004 4:44:08 AM PDT by SLB

WASHINGTON, June 29 - Maj. Gen. George S. Patton, the son and namesake of the World War II armored commander and a veteran of combat in the Korean and Vietnam Wars, died on Sunday at his home in Hamilton, Mass. He was 80.

General Patton, who retired from the Army in 1980, had been in poor health for years because of complications from hip surgery and other ailments, his wife, Joanne, said.

The younger General Patton was occasionally asked whether he felt overshadowed by his father, who gained fame for his exploits in North Africa, Sicily and France and who was introduced to new generations of Americans through George C. Scott's movie portrayal. "I've never worried about it," the son said in an interview in 1977. "I've been too busy."

The younger officer was wounded in one of his three Vietnam tours and was awarded a Purple Heart. He was twice awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the second-highest decoration for bravery in combat.

George Smith Patton was in his last year at West Point when his father, George S. Patton Jr., was killed in a traffic accident in Germany in December 1945. For a time, the younger man was known as George S. Patton III, but he eventually dropped the Roman numeral, his wife said.

General Patton acknowledged that, just as his father had, he demanded a spit-and-polish look from his soldiers. And like his father, he loved history and spoke French, Joanne Patton said. He received a master's in international affairs from George Washington University.

As a colonel, he commanded the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Vietnam. As a major general in 1975, he took command of the Second Armored Division at Fort Hood, Tex. His father had led the division in North Africa.

In 1964, the younger George Patton and other relatives objected to a new biography of the World War II commander, "Ordeal and Triumph," saying it used unauthorized material from the general's wartime diaries. Some material was deleted, and the book was published.

In retirement, the general ran Green Meadows Farm in Hamilton, north of Boston.

Also surviving are three sons, George, of Hamilton; Robert, of Darien, Conn.; and Benjamin, of New York; two daughters, Mother Margaret Patton, a nun in Bethlehem, Conn., and Helen Plusczyk of Saarbrücken, Germany; six grandchildren; and a great-grandson.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: georgespatton; obituary; patton
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I received this early this morning from the Earlybird. No idea of the source, seems like from a local paper.
1 posted on 06/30/2004 4:44:09 AM PDT by SLB
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To: Cannoneer No. 4; archy; Gringo1; Matthew James; Fred Mertz; Squantos; colorado tanker; SAMWolf

This came to me in email this morning. The source was listed as the Earlybird. I will check the Earlybird later, right now off to the "honey do."


2 posted on 06/30/2004 4:46:57 AM PDT by SLB ("We must lay before Him what is in us, not what ought to be in us." C. S. Lewis)
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To: archy; Gringo1; Matthew James; Fred Mertz; Squantos; colorado tanker; The Shrew; Darksheare; ...

Some of you are in an earlier post. Sorry about doubling.


3 posted on 06/30/2004 4:50:20 AM PDT by SLB ("We must lay before Him what is in us, not what ought to be in us." C. S. Lewis)
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To: SLB
.


Both General George S. Pattons are together again, undoubtedly having a well-deserved father-son chat, both full admiration and praise for the current generation of military heros in the ongoing U.S. strategic victory in the Middle East.


Rest in Peace, Gentlemen.


Patton@Bastogne



.
4 posted on 06/30/2004 4:54:27 AM PDT by Patton@Bastogne (John "Heinz" Kerry won't be the Nov-2004 Democratic Presidential Nominee)
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To: af_vet_rr; ALOHA RONNIE; American in Israel; American Soldier; archy; armymarinemom; BCR #226; ...

George the Third gone to Fiddler's Green.


5 posted on 06/30/2004 4:54:34 AM PDT by Cannoneer No. 4 (I've lost turret power; I have my nods and my .50. Hooah. I will stay until relieved. White 2 out.)
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

He joins a group of very honorable warriors on Gods side.


6 posted on 06/30/2004 4:57:06 AM PDT by exnavy
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To: Cannoneer No. 4; SLB

Thank you. I have a couple of what I think are funny stories about him while I was stationed at Fort Knox in the 70's. I'll share them later when I have a little more time.


7 posted on 06/30/2004 4:58:10 AM PDT by leadpenny
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To: Patton@Bastogne

8 posted on 06/30/2004 4:58:37 AM PDT by Cannoneer No. 4 (I've lost turret power; I have my nods and my .50. Hooah. I will stay until relieved. White 2 out.)
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BTW, I was about to say that I knew him as "the III" and then I read the article. RIP GSP III.


9 posted on 06/30/2004 5:00:48 AM PDT by leadpenny
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To: SLB
Source is NY Slimes.


10 posted on 06/30/2004 5:02:12 AM PDT by Cannoneer No. 4 (I've lost turret power; I have my nods and my .50. Hooah. I will stay until relieved. White 2 out.)
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To: Cannoneer No. 4
In 1976, the 1st Cav and the 2nd Armored were wargaming out on North and West Fort Hood. My platoon of C, 2/12 Cav, was sent out on a night recon and, in the process, found our way through the 2nd Armored lines. We discovered the field HQ for 2AD and called in our find to the CO. He sent out another platoon and, at about 0300, we overran the Division HQ and isolated everyone in the command tent while the CO's radioman took over the radio van.

We radioed back all of our findings to the company, who forwarded them to battalion, and up the chain it went. We sent the maps and radio code sheets back with one of the squads.

At about 0600, General Patton's helicopter came over and SGT Porter called it in to the landing zone at the HQ. When it landed and the General got out, my squad took both him "prisoner" and "captured" the helicopter as well.

We got most of his staff, his maps and radios (and code sheets), and his helicopter. 2nd Armored lost that wargame as the Cav rolled it up like a f*rtsack.

11 posted on 06/30/2004 5:02:24 AM PDT by BlueLancer (Der Elite Møøsënspåånkængrüppen ØberKømmändø (EMØØK))
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To: Cannoneer No. 4; SLB

Another BTW:

I learned yesterday from a friend that the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, General Casey is the son of the 1st Cav General who was killed in a helicopter crash in Vietnam. Damn, I'm feelin' old.


12 posted on 06/30/2004 5:03:43 AM PDT by leadpenny
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

You magnificent bastard..I READ YOUR BOOK!


13 posted on 06/30/2004 5:04:59 AM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: SLB
Mother Margaret Patton, a nun in Bethlehem, Conn.,

Yikes! *giggle*

14 posted on 06/30/2004 5:06:00 AM PDT by rabidralph (My pit bull drives an SUV.)
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To: leadpenny
In November 1968 B Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th ACR, after a lengthy period of field operations, was ordered to Bien Hoa to rest, repair its vehicles, and refit its equipment and weapons. After a few weeks B Troop was declared once again ready for combat. On short notice the troop was ordered to move North to support the 1st Infantry Division.

During the road march north the radio suddenly came to life with information that the Regimental Commander, COL George S. Patton, Blackhorse Six, was standing on the side of the road saluting each A-Cav as it went by him. The troopers on each vehicle, including myself, returned the salute as they went by Blackhorse Six. At that time, B Troop was commanded by CPT John Hays, an outstanding Troop Commander. Several days later CPT Hays was killed in an attack against dug in NVA troops.

COL Patton's simple leadership act of standing by the road and saluting each vehicle as it went by had a great affect on me. That image has stuck with me to this day.

Lee J. Pryor

HOW 1/11 1968-69

15 posted on 06/30/2004 5:09:14 AM PDT by Cannoneer No. 4 (I've lost turret power; I have my nods and my .50. Hooah. I will stay until relieved. White 2 out.)
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

May he enjoy his hero's welcome in heaven! REst in peace...


16 posted on 06/30/2004 5:17:48 AM PDT by StarCMC (Please pray for the 2/7 Marines and Josh.)
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To: Puppage

17 posted on 06/30/2004 5:19:08 AM PDT by Cannoneer No. 4 (I've lost turret power; I have my nods and my .50. Hooah. I will stay until relieved. White 2 out.)
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To: SLB

God bless him, and the old General, too. What a colorful family.

And he gets extra stars in my book for dropping the III once his father and grandfather were gone. Except for kings and popes, the numbers are supposed to be temporary, only to distinguish among *living* holders of the same name.


18 posted on 06/30/2004 5:21:04 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Tautologies are the only horses I bet on. -- Old Professer)
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To: Tax-chick; Cannoneer No. 4; SLB

The rumor around Ft. Knox when the movie, "Patton" came out was that the family would not cooperate with any studio until after Colonel Patton was selected for BG. If true, I always thought that was a classy move. They didn't want it to be said that the movie helped him get a star.


19 posted on 06/30/2004 5:26:42 AM PDT by leadpenny
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To: Tax-chick

Gen. George S. Patton visited the University of Vermont in 1972 as a speaker to the campus ROTC cadets. These were tough times in this country particularly for us military types. The General was magnificent in every respect. He was very real in those surrealistic times. Inspiring.


20 posted on 06/30/2004 5:31:43 AM PDT by Broker (Semper Fi)
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To: BlueLancer; leadpenny; Cannoneer No. 4; SLB

Thanks for sharing your stories. They are so interesting, and give us a feel for who the man really was.

Rest in Peace, General Patton.


21 posted on 06/30/2004 5:34:01 AM PDT by baseballmom (Michael Moore - An American Hatriot)
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To: leadpenny

11th Armored Cavalry Veterans of Vietnam and Cambodia (11thACVVC)

22 posted on 06/30/2004 5:39:57 AM PDT by Cannoneer No. 4 (I've lost turret power; I have my nods and my .50. Hooah. I will stay until relieved. White 2 out.)
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

Thanks for the ping.

America has been blessed by the capable military leaders. This gentleman was another example.


23 posted on 06/30/2004 5:49:06 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (Let Freedom Reign! Posted by Spackidagoosh on 28 June 2004 for the Free Iraqis!)
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To: BlueLancer

I bet the general was a real happy camper over this. I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall watching all of this.


24 posted on 06/30/2004 5:58:26 AM PDT by U S Army EOD (John Kerry, the mother of all flip floppers.)
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To: U S Army EOD
"I bet the general was a real happy camper over this."

Well, he wasn't too happy with his security people, but he was a real gentleman about it with all of us Cav guys. After the exercise was over, he sent each one of us a set of his two-star collar insignia (the silver Class-A type) and a pretty neat two paragraph memo complimenting us on our professional and tactical expertise.

Yup ... a real fine man ... but I certainly wouldn't have wanted to been a part of his HQ section during the next training cycle.

25 posted on 06/30/2004 6:02:43 AM PDT by BlueLancer (Der Elite Møøsënspåånkængrüppen ØberKømmändø (EMØØK))
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To: Cannoneer No. 4
Thanks for the ping.

God Rest the General.

26 posted on 06/30/2004 6:03:15 AM PDT by Khurkris (Will the wind ever remember the names it has blown in the past, It whispers no this will be the last)
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To: SLB

Thanks for the post SLB


27 posted on 06/30/2004 6:05:05 AM PDT by Khurkris (Will the wind ever remember the names it has blown in the past, It whispers no this will be the last)
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To: SLB
The younger officer was wounded in one of his three Vietnam tours and was awarded a Purple Heart.

Wow. And J F Kerry was "wounded" three times in his one(4 month) tour of duty. Interesting.

28 posted on 06/30/2004 6:05:37 AM PDT by mc5cents
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To: Broker

Thanks for the story. He sure looked like his father!


29 posted on 06/30/2004 6:10:48 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Tautologies are the only horses I bet on. -- Old Professer)
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To: mc5cents

"And J F Kerry was "wounded" three times in his one(4 month) tour of duty. Interesting"

Maybe he isn't real good at ducking except when it comes to questions.


30 posted on 06/30/2004 6:18:49 AM PDT by Kerberos (Groups are inherently more immoral than individuals.)
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To: SLB; Aeronaut; alfa6; ALOHA RONNIE; AnAmericanMother; aomagrat; Aquamarine; AuntB; AZ Flyboy; ...

Bumpity Bumpity Bumpity.


31 posted on 06/30/2004 6:20:37 AM PDT by Johnny Gage (What was the best thing before "sliced" bread?)
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To: BlueLancer

Hahaha love it!


32 posted on 06/30/2004 6:28:17 AM PDT by adam_az (Call your State Republican Party office and VOLUNTEER!!!!)
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To: Johnny Gage

BTTT!!!!!!!


33 posted on 06/30/2004 6:31:36 AM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: Cannoneer No. 4; SLB
General Patton was also an Army Aviator. I don't know when he went through flight school but maybe others will come along with some of the stories while he was at Ft. Wolters and Ft. Rucker. I understand there are many. During Vietnam the Army had a program that allowed a number of field commanders to attend what was termed "The Gentleman's Course." I believe Patton went through as a Colonel. The stipulation was that they could fly in Nam but their co-pilot had to be an Instructor Pilot who was instrument rated. After a number of Generals were killed, including General Casey, the Army ended the program.

In 71 and 72 I was running the Instrument Training Program for the Air Cav Squadron. It was designed to upgrade all of those Army Aviators who had Tactical Instrument ratings to Standard ratings. General Patton got his flight time on a regular basis and he had his own pilot who always flew with him. One day I got a call from the CO who said the regular pilot was on leave and Patton wanted to go get his flight time which would include some Hood time. When he got to Godman Field we talked about where he would like to go and when he needed to be back. We decided to fly the Huey down to Bowling Green, KY, have a snack, and come on back. I had the feeling that his regular pilot usually hovered the aircraft, because when I asked him if he would like to hover it out, he, of course, said yes. "Rusty" is an understatement, but we made it off the ground and on our way south. Putting the Hood on was a whole 'nother experience, but he gave it his best shot. I never saw him smoke cigarettes but did see him chew on a cigar once in a while. After he had had enough of the instrument training, he bummed a smoke from the Crew Chief. I remember getting the impression that he did it just so the young Specialist would have something else to write home about. Patton loved the troops and was a natural leader.
34 posted on 06/30/2004 6:34:02 AM PDT by leadpenny
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To: Johnny Gage

bump


35 posted on 06/30/2004 6:38:24 AM PDT by Soaring Feather (~The Dragon Flies' Lair~ Poetry and Prose~)
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To: BlueLancer
I was attached to 2AD during that exercise. My job was to to haul the Generals TOC around. He was a good guy.

God bless General.

36 posted on 06/30/2004 6:38:57 AM PDT by jwalsh07
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To: BlueLancer
After the exercise was over, he sent each one of us a set of his two-star collar insignia (the silver Class-A type) and a pretty neat two paragraph memo complimenting us on our professional and tactical expertise.

Sounds like he was a class act.

37 posted on 06/30/2004 6:39:25 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: Johnny Gage

Thanks for the ping, Johnny! BTTT!


38 posted on 06/30/2004 6:41:23 AM PDT by MistyCA (For some...it's always going to be "A Nam Thing!")
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

The younger General Patton was occasionally asked whether he felt overshadowed by his father, who gained fame for his exploits in North Africa, Sicily and France and who was introduced to new generations of Americans through George C. Scott's movie portrayal. "I've never worried about it," the son said in an interview in 1977. "I've been too busy."

His father would be proud of him for this.


39 posted on 06/30/2004 6:42:05 AM PDT by Valin (Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. It's just that yours is stupid.)
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

May he rest in peace.


40 posted on 06/30/2004 6:42:59 AM PDT by MistyCA (For some...it's always going to be "A Nam Thing!")
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To: BlueLancer

Somebody got their butt in a sling over this.


41 posted on 06/30/2004 6:44:00 AM PDT by Valin (Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. It's just that yours is stupid.)
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To: SLB

Don't know much about this guy, but I know his father was a great American.


42 posted on 06/30/2004 6:48:50 AM PDT by Thane_Banquo
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To: Patton@Bastogne

Patton seems to have arrived at Bastogne after the 101st and others had already fought the enemy to a standstill.


43 posted on 06/30/2004 6:52:24 AM PDT by Protagoras (government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." ...Ronald Reagan, 1981)
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To: leadpenny
I was a "cadet" at Fort Knox in the summer of '77. I heard some of those stories. In 1993 when I attended the Armor Officer's Advanced Course there, they were still floating about.
44 posted on 06/30/2004 7:24:29 AM PDT by ExSoldier (.45 Auto: The Original "Point and Click" interface!)
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To: SLB
G S Patton III had apparently made enemies in the course of his career. Who knows why, jealousy over his flamboyant leadership style while commanding the 11th ACR, spite, complaints that he had a drinking problem, who knows. In any case his final tour of duty represented a victory by these people. From being commander of the Armor School he went to being the Deputy Chief of Staff for Readiness of Army material Command. AMC was and is the supporting and equipping arm MACOM of the Army and is regarded with dismissive contempt by many in the combat arms as its knick name 'A Million Civilians' shows. Being given an a HQ AMC staff appointment would have been insult enough to a combat arms officer of such distinguished name and repute. However, DCS Readiness was , I believe, a deliberate and careful insult. DCS Readiness was a grab bag of largely unrelated functions including management of the two AMC controlled reserve center, logistics support plans, exercises, including AMC participation in a large annual USAR logistics simulation named LOGEX. Within the peck order of AMC Readiness pretty much sucked hind tit and was regularly rolled by the larger DCS's such as Supply, Maintenance, and Transportation. So as a final assignment before retiring it was a real insult.

However, unlike some other general officers who had been rusticated to AMC Patton did not react either as amartyr or with visible disgust at his final assignment. He was known as a polite, courteous, and gentlemanly leader who listened carefully to what civilian workers and managers had to say. He also made a point of knowing each person who worked in his organization by name, which is a very nice touch in a manager. When he retired his official ceremony was held at the Armored School but at the reception tendered him at AMC virtually every employee of DCS Readiness participated. Patton was a warfighter but he was far better liked by his civilian employees than a number of combat service support general officers who followed him.
45 posted on 06/30/2004 7:26:19 AM PDT by robowombat
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To: SLB; Johnny Gage

Welcome Home


46 posted on 06/30/2004 7:26:34 AM PDT by The Mayor (The race of life is run by faith and won by grace.)
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To: SLB
Thanks for the ping. Another great Cowboy coming home after a long days journey May his legion live on. Semper Fi Marine wife/mom nanna of6
47 posted on 06/30/2004 7:31:53 AM PDT by sns5151
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

Thank God for this hero and his family!


48 posted on 06/30/2004 7:33:21 AM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: Cannoneer No. 4

Good morning.
In 1968 my company worked for the 11th ACR for a while and I met Col. Patton in our TOC a couple of times. I remember him being cool towards us, probably because we were too loose for him. Blackhorse was a good unit to work for which, to me, means Patton was a good leader.

Michael Frazier


49 posted on 06/30/2004 7:37:13 AM PDT by brazzaville (No surrender, no retreat. Well, maybe retreat's ok.)
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To: robowombat

I remember when he ended up at AMC or DARCOM or whatever it was called. Didn't he have a tour in Germany after being the Armor School Commandant? The reason I ask that is because there were stories he had been in the front seat of a Huey when they violated some kind of German restricted airspace. I also remember that the Army Times ran a story that he was about to retire when he was a BG. Soon after that he came out on the MG list. Not sure of all my dates.


50 posted on 06/30/2004 7:46:08 AM PDT by leadpenny
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