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Indians have started to invent
Rediff ^ | 14 may | aidni

Posted on 05/13/2005 10:38:28 PM PDT by aidni

Who says Indians cannot come up with revolutionary inventions? Take the case of Arvind Thiagarajan, a young Indian scientist, for example.

The head of department of a hospital in Singapore asked Arvind Thiagarajan whether he could solve the problems that they faced while storing large images of echo cardiograms. As per legal requirements, doctors have to store the images for seven years.

"He asked me whether I could help him build a better digital base to store the large amount of information he had. He asked me because of my IT background. I said, why not. I also told him that some kind of compression would help," says 25-year-old Arvind Thiagarajan.

It was to help this Singapore doctor that he started working on digital images.

"As I didn't have a PhD in image compression, I went through a process of trial and error. It was just a coincidence -- or rather a stroke of good luck -- that helped me hit upon an idea. The method I adopted is very simple."

Arvind Thiagarajan explains how he compressed data, on his way to a path-breaking invention.

An invention that saves money, time and precious resources, and at the same time also exemplifies simplicity.

"Conventionally, compression is done using complex transformations such as Discrete Cosine Transformations (DCT) or data transformations, wherein the whole image is converted into a frequency signal and some of the high frequency details are filtered. Because of that loss, we are able to get the data compressed. This is a well-known method used all over the world.

"What I thought was a completely new approach where you keep the data in the original form itself. It was challenging to code colours. Although they look quite similar to human eyes, in reality, there are minor variations in them. The pattern is not like single pixel colours occurring continuously; it will be like, if one is in the 1st position, the other is in the 5th and another in the 10th.

"So, the challenge was to put all of them together. I felt if we can do that by rearranging the data, we can code them better. When we rearrange the data, it is necessary that we need to maintain the original order. That's where the technique of repetition coding using an index, which we call it as bit- plane, originated.

"What we do is, we maintain a binary index to store the original location of the data when we do the rearrangement and coding. So, at the decompression stage, we can bring back the original data without any loss because we had already indexed it. So, it's a perfectly reversible technique, and very simple, too.

"I really don't know how I hit upon the idea. It was more of a practical approach where intuition played a part. It was logical thinking that helped me.

"Yes, I wondered why nobody in the world thought of this before because it is such a simple thought. Thousands of papers are produced all around the world on compression of data but, somehow, nobody has thought of this fundamental problem."

Not only lossless, but more compression too

When Arvind Thiagarajan applied the compression technique on the images from the hospital, he got 35 times lossless compression. The compression was only 5 times in the traditional techniques like JPEG and data was lost.

Doctors of the Singapore Hospital were surprised and wondered how could a lossless technique give 35 times better compression than a system that produces loss.

In medical applications, doctors cannot afford to lose any data.

Without any delay, the hospital asked the inventor to implement the technique in the hospital.

It was then that he decided to start a new company. A businessman from Singapore became his partner and an Indian investor from Korea also joined and put in $1 million.

Thus, in 2003, MatrixView was born.

According to Arvind Thiagarajan, the name MatrixView was chosen because "we view every image as a matrix. We transform the matrix, we also rearrange the matrix."

But the scientific community was sceptical initially.

"They were sceptical because conventionally, it is known that lossless compression can give only a maximum of 2 times or 3 times compression. So, when we are getting 30 times compression, that too lossless, they wouldn't believe it.

"We had to build a demo and show them independently, and let a third party test it out. We engaged Ernst & Young technology audit team to do the independent testing."

Then, the question came: whether they could manage the same kind of compression with documents, radiology images, echo images, natural colour images, et cetera.

"They couldn't really accept the fact that an Indian company has done this and not an American company," Arvind Thiagarajan remarked.

The beginning

Arvind Thiagarajan had been interested in science and technology even as a school student; it fascinated him to know how things work. This curiosity led him to think differently and develop new products even as a student.

While in school and college, he was more involved in the practical implementation of science, rather than the theory.

It was after joining Anna University as an engineering student in electronics and communication that his creative mind spread its wings far and wide.

Junior scientist award from President Abdul Kalam

It was for a paper he published on the role of multimedia PCs in healthcare that he won the award at a competition held in Chennai.

At that time, he was developing a combined monitor that could show all the different parameters of the body -- such as ECGs, mechanical activities of the heart, echoes and blood pressure.

The paper was about how to get all the signals on a centralised monitoring station, or a PC, so that the doctors could analyse it and store it for later reference. This would mainly help doctors in handling the large amount of details about every patient. It can also be called a patient monitoring system.

The Junior Scientist Award was presented to him in 2001 by the then scientific advisor to the Government of India and the current President of India Dr APJ Abdul Kalam.

"He had always been my mentor as he used to spend a lot of time in Anna University. He used to give lectures on how important patent protection is and how India could be the world's technology leader. I was so inspired by him that I decided against going to the United States to pursue higher studies."

Patenting his first invention

Arvind Thiagarajan followed Abdul Kalam's advice of patenting his inventions and ideas without any delay. The first patent was for a device that diagnosed cardiac problems.

Cardiac diagnosis is generally done using Ultra Sound Echo, which costs about half a million dollars. In sharp contradistinction, the device Thiagarajan invented costs only $500! Even home users can use it with ease, he says.

This patent came to the notice of the Singapore government and it showed interest in incubating the technology. They offered an investment of around Singapore $1 million and invited Arvind to go to Singapore and set up a company.

The offer was to develop a product and then commercially market it. He decided to take up the offer.

"It was almost like starting my own venture immediately after I finished my college. It was a great experience. It exposed me to what is happening all around the world and helped me develop a wider perspective like how investors look at new technology, what are the challenges in commercialising new core technology into the market, the steps to be taken, et cetera."

In two years, the clinical trials of his product called 'HeartCard' were conducted. He, however, feels -- on retrospection -- that there was a flaw in the strategy that he adopted to commercialise the product.

Instead of targeting doctors and hospitals, it was targeted at end-users. This, he feels, affected the commercial positioning of the product.

Now that he has learnt more about marketing tricks, he plans to bring the product back into the market once again.

It was while the clinical trials of 'HeartCard' were going on that the doctors asked him about compressing data. Consequently, he came up with the path-breaking invention.

Once MatrixView was formed, he began the fund raising exercise by listing the company on the Australian Stock Exchange in August 2004 and raised about Aus $2.5 million.

Why the Australian Stock Exchange?

"We found that Asian markets are more comfortable in investing in conventional industries, and not core technology. So, it can either be in the US or in Australia. We felt we were too early for the US market. But we were told that Australian stock exchange was open- minded. Within 5 minutes of our listing in the Australian Stock Exchange, our price was doubled from 50 cents into 1 dollar. Within a month, it went up to 1 dollar 80 cents," says he.

Application: Once MatrixView got a patent for the core algorithm, it started looking at the application side of the algorithm. This fundamental technique can be applied in all kinds of images -- medical image, document image, natural colours in the digital cameras, video cameras, CDs, DVDs, in the post-production studios, medical applications, defence, mobile phones, surveillance, imaging, broadcasting. . . where large data has to be stored.

The core algorithm developed by Arvind Thiagarajan allows lesser loss of data and larger compression.

Products: The company decided to call the first product from MatrixView, based on the core algorithm, 'EchoView.'

1. EchoView is a hardware solution that captures the Echocardiogram directly whilst the scan goes on. These images are then optimised with ABO (Adaptive Binary Optimisation) and archived in MatrixView's .mvu format.

Using the existing LAN network, these images are easily transmitted and then retrieved.

The company anticipates EchoView replacing the use of VHS video cassettes to store ultrasound scans in hospitals as EchoView substantially reduces the cost of storage and retrieval.

"If you were to digitise the moving frame of echo data in a hospital, you need 60 gigabytes of data. But with 30 times compression, it can be compressed to just 2 gigabytes of data. This image can be transferred within the hospital for the doctors to see," says the chief scientist.

The first hospitals where EchoView was implemented were the Sri Sathya Sai Super Speciality Hospitals at Whitefield (near Bangalore) and Puttaparthi (in Andhra Pradesh).

In a country like India, with the help of EchoView, images from rural clinics -- where there are not many good doctors -- can easily be sent to a specialty hospital in the city for expert opinion.

2. DocuMAT: 'DocuMAT' is for document imaging. "Today's businesses in the insurance, financial services, legal healthcare and government sectors generate, exchange and store huge amount of document image files. With their huge file size, document files clog corporate networks, slowing the pace of communication and business.

The huge pile of papers in these offices can be scanned and saved for several years. They can store this in a centralised depository in a highly compressed manner so that it will save a lot of storage cost," Arvind Thiagarajan explains.

With many foreign companies transferring lots of documents from their offices in the US and Europe for outsourcing to India, they need fast and lossless data transmission.

"The advantage we offer is high lossless compression. Banks and insurance companies in the US and Europe send a lot of data to India as a part of outsourcing. It is a huge business."

At present, MatrixView has a software application team of 10 in Singapore, while the core research team of 50 in Chennai.

His plans for future

"If what we plan now is going to take place, we will be a billion dollar company in the next five years with at least 5,000 employees. We want to be among the top five high-technology companies in the world."


TOPICS: Technical
KEYWORDS: china; computers; globalism; india; invention; trade
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India Rules
1 posted on 05/13/2005 10:38:28 PM PDT by aidni
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To: aidni
"...build a better digital base..."

Not precisely the same thing as original thinking. AKA, Yankee ingenuity.

2 posted on 05/13/2005 10:42:41 PM PDT by steenkeenbadges
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To: aidni

So how do I get in on the IPO?


3 posted on 05/13/2005 10:43:20 PM PDT by GVnana
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To: aidni
Well, with a name like Arvind Thingamajig he SHOULD be able to invent!
4 posted on 05/13/2005 10:48:38 PM PDT by politicket (We now live in a society where "tolerance" is celebrated at the expense of moral correctness.)
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To: aidni

India has some serious technical capabilities and people....


5 posted on 05/13/2005 11:39:40 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (This tagline no longer operative....floated away in the flood of 2005 ,)
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To: aidni

Why is this in the .........Activism/Chapters; Announcements;............Topic areas?


6 posted on 05/13/2005 11:40:44 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (This tagline no longer operative....floated away in the flood of 2005 ,)
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To: steenkeenbadges

I disagree.


7 posted on 05/14/2005 12:04:00 AM PDT by strategofr (One if by land, two if by sea, three if by the Internet)
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To: politicket

LOL! (You made me go back and re-read the name.)


8 posted on 05/14/2005 12:04:41 AM PDT by strategofr (One if by land, two if by sea, three if by the Internet)
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To: aidni
Cardiac diagnosis is generally done using Ultra Sound Echo, which costs about half a million dollars. In sharp contradistinction, the device Thiagarajan invented costs only $500! Even home users can use it with ease, he says.

It won't be $500 after they figure in the costs for getting it approved by the FDA, liability insurance, distribution, marketing, lobbying, etc.

9 posted on 05/14/2005 12:21:50 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; aidni

<< India has some serious technical capabilities and People .... >>

And now for a little FReedom, the purging of their epidemic, abject, corruption and, especially, a return to the foundation of the Judeo-Christian/Roman/English Law with which the British gifted them!

To give them even a half chance of getting anywhere -- and of allowing their billion-plus poor and [Effectively] enslaved to advance from the Middle-Ages-like squalor in which they subsist.


10 posted on 05/14/2005 12:43:48 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: aidni

Who says? Who cares? I didn't ask this question, so why am I treated to an answer to it? India sucks..


11 posted on 05/14/2005 12:46:25 AM PDT by Havoc (Reagan was right and so was McKinley. Down with free trade. Hang the traitors high)
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To: Brian Allen

Good night!

Time to get some shut eye!


12 posted on 05/14/2005 1:07:42 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (This tagline no longer operative....floated away in the flood of 2005 ,)
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Comment #13 Removed by Moderator

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Nite Nite -- Sleep Tite!


14 posted on 05/14/2005 1:43:54 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: aidni
"Not only lossless, but more compression too."

That is a big deal, and with an original system for compression. ...good work! Oh, and don't mind the sour words of the sore losers who were betting on China tech.
15 posted on 05/14/2005 2:46:53 AM PDT by familyop ("Let us try" sounds better, don't you think? "Essayons" is so...Latin.)
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To: aidni
Will have to dig up info on .mvu image format..

This could be the new .jpg or .png ...

16 posted on 05/14/2005 2:52:54 AM PDT by Drammach (Freedom; not just a job, it's an adventure..)
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To: Brian Allen

Isnt it amazing that a poor person living in middle age squalor can compete ;)


17 posted on 05/14/2005 3:12:59 AM PDT by SlamIslam
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To: aidni
What's the big deal? If I want to compress my data I just change the font size
18 posted on 05/14/2005 3:39:36 AM PDT by Joe Driscoll
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To: aidni

Great news, this is what globalization is all about to me. We all benefit from the discoveries wherether they are made.
India is producing a great number of engineers and scientists.


19 posted on 05/14/2005 4:26:47 AM PDT by ran15
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To: politicket
Well, with a name like Arvind Thingamajig he SHOULD be able to invent!

Hmm

20 posted on 05/14/2005 6:12:53 AM PDT by A. Pole (Vladimir Ilyich Lenin: "The Capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them. ")
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To: glorgau
"It won't be $500 after they figure in the costs for getting it approved by the FDA, liability insurance, distribution, marketing, lobbying, etc."


In one line you have summarized why the United States may well lose it's place at the high tech leader of the world. Between bureaucrats and lawyers, it would seem that there is a near insurmountable barrier which India doesn't have.

Ironically, if America had not gone bureau-socialist, these devices could reduce the cost of medical care for the elderly and thus allow a return to historic medicine in America.
21 posted on 05/14/2005 6:19:33 AM PDT by GladesGuru
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To: aidni

If he manages to resist the temptations to buy into the med racket, his Heart Card will allow for a huge market. And that doersn't even begin to cover teh possibilities of providing for analysis of teh data - also for fee.

Hopefully he, and his investors, will go for the mass market rather than trying for the top dollar per patient. The Apple v. PC analogy comes to mind.


22 posted on 05/14/2005 6:25:26 AM PDT by GladesGuru
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To: Havoc

"India sucks"

Then why do you bother reading articles that, by the title, obviously praise it?


23 posted on 05/14/2005 6:41:08 AM PDT by razoroccam (Then in the name of Allah, they will let loose the Germs of War (http://www.booksurge.com))
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To: aidni

According to Arvind Thiagarajan, the name MatrixView was chosen because "we view every image as a matrix. We transform the matrix, we also rearrange the matrix."


I'm going to have to check into this some more. We may have an application, too.
`


24 posted on 05/14/2005 7:00:56 AM PDT by AFPhys ((.Praying for President Bush, our troops, their families, and all my American neighbors..))
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To: Joe Driscoll
What will you do to a image
Diminish it and since medicos can't afford to lose the data hence this project was initiated by a Doctor
25 posted on 05/14/2005 8:03:32 AM PDT by aidni
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To: Havoc; Brian Allen; razoroccam; Ernest_at_the_Beach; aidni
Who says? Who cares? I didn't ask this question, so why am I treated to an answer to it? India sucks..
 
For some people here India sucks because it routinely takes away jobs, gatecrashes into exclusive clubs of  so-called "developed countries",  breaks into bastions traditionally held by the *ahem*  "sole superpower", routinely proves critics wrong about its capabilities..........
Sucks? Think not. I think we rock!
 
And ofcourse for some India is or rather should be "billion-plus poor and [Effectively] enslaved " and "Middle-Ages-like squalor in which they subsist" but how the hell does it dares invent stuff that none other than the "sole superpower" should be inventing. What audacity!
 
I can understand how much it pains to see the "sole Hyperpower" being given a run for its money by the "billion-plus poor and [Effectively] enslaved " and the land of "Middle-Ages-like squalor ".
 
No wonder all such news about technological achievements is met with a kind of scorn and jealousy that indicates an insecurity that the "Hyperpower" days are numbered. However a better way to deal with such insecurities is to attribute these individual enterprises to non entities like  "Judeo-Christian/Roman/English Law ". Brian, if it helps you believeing that then why not.
 
BTWAre you asleep yet?

26 posted on 05/14/2005 8:26:04 AM PDT by Gengis Khan (Since light travels faster than sound, people appear bright until u hear them speak.)
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To: glorgau

I do not understand this statement. The decompression of the files should only deal with the output of the Ultra Sound Echo. I believe you are still going to need that $500,000 machine to create the files that the $500 device will compress.


27 posted on 05/14/2005 8:32:45 AM PDT by DennisR (Look around - there are countless observable clues that God exists)
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To: SlamIslam

<< Isnt it amazing that a poor person living in middle age squalor can compete ;) >>

Amazing.

Almighty God's miracles never cease to amaze me.

[Too]

Why; speaking of miracles; did you know that -- for just one example -- Doctor Condoleeza Rice, who started life in a sharecropper's shack and entered the University of Denver at the age of 15, competed so successfully that by the age of 49 she had been propelled into the most important government job on God's Green Earth??!!

And that it is a given that as fast as India's beautiful Peoples are set FRee their rise will be as meteoric??!!

And the sky no limit??!!

Speaking of miracles.

Blessings -- Brian


28 posted on 05/14/2005 8:35:55 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Gengis Khan

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaawwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwn

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz .....
<];^)~<


29 posted on 05/14/2005 8:38:49 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: DennisR

You are talking about two different things here:

1. Image acquisition devices (that as you say would cost ...say $500,000)

2. Image compression softwares (that will now cost $500)

Image compression softwares is important when you consider transfer, storage and retrival of high resolution images which are *large files* and plus the related medical data associated with the image.

I know it since worked in the field of Medical imaging (Dicom) :)


30 posted on 05/14/2005 8:52:54 AM PDT by Gengis Khan (Since light travels faster than sound, people appear bright until u hear them speak.)
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To: Brian Allen
Doctor Condoleeza Rice, who started life in a sharecropper's shack

NOT.

Good grief.

31 posted on 05/14/2005 8:56:35 AM PDT by M. Thatcher
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To: Gengis Khan
And ofcourse for some India is or rather should be "billion-plus poor and [Effectively] enslaved " and "Middle-Ages-like squalor in which they subsist" but how the hell does it dares invent stuff that none other than the "sole superpower" should be inventing. What audacity!

Nobody said that. Some of us just think India should build itself without dumping their labor costs on the US market.. putting countless americans out of work. Nobody's trying to keep india down IMO. And nobody particularly wants India down. But there's a difference between building something and taking what others have built.

32 posted on 05/14/2005 12:07:11 PM PDT by Havoc (Reagan was right and so was McKinley. Down with free trade. Hang the traitors high)
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To: razoroccam
Then why do you bother reading articles that, by the title, obviously praise it?

Oh, I get it, if you disagree with something, you avoid the subject?

33 posted on 05/14/2005 12:09:40 PM PDT by Havoc (Reagan was right and so was McKinley. Down with free trade. Hang the traitors high)
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To: Havoc; razoroccam

"Oh, I get it, if you disagree with something, you avoid the subject?"

You didnt say you disagreed. You said "Who cares". Well if you dont care why bother?


34 posted on 05/14/2005 12:24:37 PM PDT by Gengis Khan (Since light travels faster than sound, people appear bright until u hear them speak.)
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To: Havoc

"Some of us just think India should build itself without dumping their labor costs on the US market.. putting countless americans out of work."

We all "dump" a lot of things on each other. "Dumping" is a very old game. Even the US does it in our part of the world and big time.

In fact the US is a very old player in this game just that you have probably not heard about the US doing it. Globalisation has only made it possible for "the third world" to dump a few things on the US now. Its a dog eat dog world world ya know. We are only playing by the rules (and we didnt make those rules).

We "suck" because we play well.

And as for the article......the guy has built something, he isnt stealing anything nor is he taking what others have built.


35 posted on 05/14/2005 12:38:34 PM PDT by Gengis Khan (Since light travels faster than sound, people appear bright until u hear them speak.)
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To: Brian Allen

"Doctor Condoleeza Rice, who started life in a sharecropper's shack and entered the University of Denver at the age of 15, competed so successfully that by the age of 49 she had been propelled into the most important government job on God's Green Earth??!!"

Our President Dr.Abdul Kalam (Muslim) used to sell newspapers as a child. He is also the father of our nuclear bombs and ICBMs. In other words he himself grew up from utter poverty and made India a nuclear power. Not bad eh?


36 posted on 05/14/2005 12:43:52 PM PDT by Gengis Khan (Since light travels faster than sound, people appear bright until u hear them speak.)
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To: Havoc

What subject am I avoiding?

Once again, why do you bother showing up on threads that are pro-India if you don't like India?


37 posted on 05/14/2005 2:22:28 PM PDT by razoroccam (Then in the name of Allah, they will let loose the Germs of War (http://www.booksurge.com))
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To: Brian Allen

Amazing on two scores
1. You wrote sentences that are in understandable English
2. I agree with what you posted.

Wonders never cease.


38 posted on 05/14/2005 2:25:50 PM PDT by razoroccam (Then in the name of Allah, they will let loose the Germs of War (http://www.booksurge.com))
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To: GladesGuru
Ironically, if America had not gone bureau-socialist, these devices could reduce the cost of medical care for the elderly and thus allow a return to historic medicine in America.

How come that in Sweden medical care is both cheaper and delivers better results? Why Sweden is one of the leading centers of medical innovation?

39 posted on 05/14/2005 4:53:04 PM PDT by A. Pole (Vladimir Ilyich Lenin: "The Capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them. ")
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To: Brian Allen
Doctor Condoleeza Rice, who started life in a sharecropper's shack

Did she?!

"Ms Rice's mother was a music teacher who taught her to play the piano. Her father was a pastor and college principal" ( Profile: Condoleezza Rice)

40 posted on 05/14/2005 4:58:28 PM PDT by A. Pole (Vladimir Ilyich Lenin: "The Capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them. ")
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To: Gengis Khan
That's a great point on India's president!

From one Savage Garden song...

...I hate this silence, it's getting so loud!

The story about Condoleeza Rice was inspiring too. Great people, I guess, have similar paths in the walks of life.

41 posted on 05/14/2005 9:32:21 PM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: A. Pole

Yep.

But you get the picture.

FRom relatively humble beginnings any and every American can aspire to and reach any pinicle of success!

[While, as an example on the other hand, "African" (According, when he was there, to his State Department "homepage") American, Colin Powell, was the American-born son of relatively well-to-do British migrants. But that has never stopped him reaching for every "affirmative action" free-lunch at every step of a life during which he has never held a non-governmental post, been responsible to a profit nor met a payroll] ]


42 posted on 05/15/2005 7:52:13 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: M. Thatcher

A little symbolic Licence permitted -- no?


43 posted on 05/15/2005 7:55:04 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Gengis Khan

<< Our President Dr.Abdul Kalam (Who cares) used to sell newspapers as a child. He is also the father of our nuclear bombs and "ICBMs." In other words he grew up from utter poverty and [Helped India to build a dozen or so Hiroshima-era atom bombs.] Not bad eh? >>

If one could measure the worth of a state by its bombs, that would place India on a par with Pakistan.

Not bad eh?

But, more seriously, since the paper-seller days [Me too!] has Abdul Kalam ever held a non-governmental position, been responsible for making a profit and/or met a payroll?

Blessings -- Brian


44 posted on 05/15/2005 8:02:57 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: aidni
It's interesting that in the last few months, FreeRepublic has been inundated by posters from India, who only post about India. It's almost as if we have an organized group that is using this forum as a public relations venue.

I find it odd that these posters are incapable of using forums in India or creating their own forums that deal with India. They seem to find it necessary to abuse this forum with their pro-India propoganda.

The admins really need to take a look at this issue before FR becomes overrun by this shorts of shills.
45 posted on 05/15/2005 8:06:24 AM PDT by StolarStorm
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To: aidni; GVgirl; Havoc
India Rules

Oh I wouldn't say that, but they are pretty good at scamming people. I can think of a dozen products that turned to crap after having had the software to run them outsourced to the land of fakirs, most notably HP scanning products, of which many now require the installation of the Java runtime engine just to work. The last scanner my company bought had a driver installation CD that spewed 280 MB of Indian garbage onto the drive, and had a crummy scanner app that ran in IE and took forever to load. The hardware itself was a pile of Chinese junk that had the look and feel of an low-end Lexmark printer from 1994.

As for the claim for the invention of a new compression scheme, it looks like the only people the Indians have beaten are the chumps at the ASX.

Read below from website

Matrixview had employed JBIG lossless compression algorithm, ABC (Advanced Blocksorting Compression), LZW compression by Unisys, LogLuv Compression by SGI, JPEG compression, FreeImage software and some lesser known academic works and scrambled into software called DocuMAT and Echoview. It’s little wonder why Ernst & Young’s report on Matrixview’s DocuMat (also known Dataview earlier) software revealed exact same performance as JBIG !!! Why didn’t Ernst & Young notice this phenomenon earlier when they conducted their independent tests? If the same compression engine was used, you basically achieve the same results!

More Here

46 posted on 05/15/2005 9:20:43 AM PDT by Orbiting_Rosie's_Head
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To: Orbiting_Rosie's_Head
Scamming is right. We have the same problem here in the States with Indian job applicants. They tend to exaggerate and lie on their resumes more than people from any other country. I love all the "Net experts" we get, that can't even write a Hello World app.
47 posted on 05/15/2005 9:53:07 AM PDT by StolarStorm
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To: Brian Allen

"But, more seriously, since the paper-seller days [Me too!] has Abdul Kalam ever held a non-governmental position, been responsible for making a profit and/or met a payroll? "

This guy didnt just built the bombs and ICBMs but also built SLV and PSLV that launches satellites.
But comming back why does it really matter? I guess according to you if you are not into profit making, you are not really a success story is it?

Well for one in the business of making nukes, I dont suppose there is much profit to be made ( ........................................................... well unless ofcourse you are a scientist from Pakistan. Scientist? I suppose not ........more correctly our next door gunrunner Abdul Qader Khan (no relation to our Abdul Kalam) had his own syndicate/cartel. Payroll? This guy had his own bankroll. A true success story by your yardstick.

While our poor guy APJ Abdul Kalam built the bomb not for profits but to gives us the "ultimate deterent". Us Indies are grateful to him for that.

"If one could measure the worth of a state by its bombs, that would place India on a par with Pakistan. "

......or for that matter the US with N Korea?
I consider the Pakis a much more worthy state than India. We built/tested the bomb the old fashioned way and got our ass kicked by the whole goddamed world. The Pakis were smart, they laundered the bomb from the Chicoms and nobody cared. And look at them now, how successfully they ran a nuclear trade business with half the Muslim world. They dont just get away with it but also get rewarded with F-16s! FRee-trade enterprise always wins!

Nah! We(Indies) are way way behind the Pakis! We should be learning some of their stuff.


48 posted on 05/15/2005 10:10:58 AM PDT by Gengis Khan (Since light travels faster than sound, people appear bright until u hear them speak.)
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To: Brian Allen
A little symbolic Licence permitted -- no?

No. In any assertion on biography, stick to facts, truth, accuracy.

And in Condi's case especially, no ridiculous distortion such as yours is warranted. Her actual history is quite inspiring — and she is quite rightly proud of having been brought up by two college-educated and successful parents.

49 posted on 05/15/2005 11:32:13 AM PDT by M. Thatcher
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To: StolarStorm
I love all the "Net experts" we get, that can't even write a Hello World app.

I've worked with many Indians. Their performance doesn't match their hype.

50 posted on 05/15/2005 1:04:14 PM PDT by Orbiting_Rosie's_Head
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