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Slovakian Coyote lives, protects American dream (Corpsman for Marines)
Marinelink ^ | June 24, 2005 | Cpl. C. Alex Herron

Posted on 06/24/2005 10:04:24 AM PDT by Ramonan

AL TAQADDUM, Iraq(June 24, 2005) -- At 21 years of age Zuzana Drahosova left her native country of Slovakia for America. Focused on a better life, she had the U.S. Navy in mind.

After paying for an extension on her visa, Drahosova had $80 to her name and began working three jobs trying to build up enough money to survive and eventually obtain a “green card” so she could enter the military service.

“It was tough,” said Drahosova, who called Pensacola, Fla., home at the time. “The first year I lived in America I worked all the time. I never had a day off and was always struggling to get by. I was tempted to just give up and return home, but I had a goal and I wasn’t going to fail.”

Working three jobs and just getting by was not what Drahosova had in mind when she went to America. The military was a way for her to learn important skills and build a solid foundation for a new life.

In January 2003, two years after getting to America, Drahosova let the journey begin. She reported for basic training and later checked in to field medical school. While in training she took her first steps toward becoming an American citizen.

“My chief in school gave me the citizenship paperwork and six months later I was granted my citizenship,” said Drahosova, who is now a petty officer third class. “Now I have nothing holding me back on having all of the opportunities that are available to all Americans.”

Not long after school she reported to Marine Light/Attack Helicopter Squadron 775 in Camp Pendleton, Calif. Soon after joining the squadron they deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in February 2004.

(Excerpt) Read more at marines.mil ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; Philosophy; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: corpsman; immigrant; legalimmigration; militar; naturalized; navy; squidette
The right way to come to the USA
1 posted on 06/24/2005 10:04:25 AM PDT by Ramonan
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To: Ramonan

Why the 'Coyote' in the title, I wonder? What am I missing?


2 posted on 06/24/2005 10:06:25 AM PDT by HiJinx (Remember, you have to seal the dike before you can drain the swamp.)
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To: Ramonan
Nevermind, it's the unit nickname...had to go to the link to see 'the rest of the story.'

Shortly after their return to the U.S. seven months later, the unit prepared to deploy to Iraq again. Upon returning to America, the Coyotes were at a 70 percent medical readiness rate. Drahosova had her work cut out for her and struck out to prepare the squadron for another deployment to the Middle East.

“She brought the squadron to a 96 percent medical readiness rate before returning to Iraq,” said Cmdr. Michael Dorney, the Coyotes’ flight surgeon. “On top of that, she was studying to get her Fleet Marine Force pin which she received a few months ago.”

3 posted on 06/24/2005 10:08:21 AM PDT by HiJinx (Remember, you have to seal the dike before you can drain the swamp.)
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To: HiJinx

Think that's the nickname of her squad....


4 posted on 06/24/2005 10:08:35 AM PDT by Hi Heels (Guns kill and cause crime? Dang, mine must be malfunctioning....)
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To: Ramonan

Great post.

Direct contrast to many Americans born here.


5 posted on 06/24/2005 10:12:34 AM PDT by wallcrawlr (Moderates = You're the wise middle. Like a spare tire around the fat waist of society.)
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To: Ramonan
This is a great story. I wish more Americans (especially men) had the intelligence and drive and bravery of this young woman.
6 posted on 06/24/2005 10:14:34 AM PDT by 68skylark
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To: Ramonan

Great story..thanks for posting...figures the military would NOT take advantage of her linguistic skills..there is always the tendency to put the square peg in the round hole...well, at least they didn't make her a cook..


7 posted on 06/24/2005 10:18:49 AM PDT by ken5050
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To: HiJinx

I had the same question until I read the article. It's her squadron's nickname..unfortunaetly the term "coyote" also has connotations of illegals and prostitution, because of other usages..


8 posted on 06/24/2005 10:20:12 AM PDT by ken5050
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To: RaceBannon

CORPSMAN! Bump


9 posted on 06/24/2005 10:20:34 AM PDT by Tennessee_Bob ("Nac Mac Feegle! The Wee Free Men! Nae king! Nae quin! Nae laird! We willna be fooled again!")
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To: Ramonan

Can we send Dick Durbin over in exchange? Welcome to our new fellow American.


10 posted on 06/24/2005 10:22:37 AM PDT by justshutupandtakeit (Public Enemy #1, the RATmedia.)
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To: Ramonan

Wow! What an awesome article about a person who came to this country the right way, assimilated and persevered. That's the kind of people we need, and are all about.


11 posted on 06/24/2005 10:24:46 AM PDT by Millicent_Hornswaggle (US Marine wife)
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To: Ramonan

Amen! Good for her.


12 posted on 06/24/2005 10:29:38 AM PDT by rabidralph
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To: Ramonan
The right way to come to the USA

Obviously not. She worked three jobs without a green card.

13 posted on 06/24/2005 10:36:25 AM PDT by tarator
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To: tarator

she had a visa. she wasn't illegal.


14 posted on 06/24/2005 10:40:58 AM PDT by absolootezer0 ("My God, why have you forsaken us.. no wait, its the liberals that have forsaken you... my bad")
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To: Ramonan
Slovakian Coyote lives, protects American dream
Submitted by: 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing
Story by: Computed Name: Cpl. C. Alex Herron
Story Identification #: 20056242176

AL TAQADDUM, Iraq(June 24, 2005) -- At 21 years of age Zuzana Drahosova left her native country of Slovakia for America. Focused on a better life, she had the U.S. Navy in mind.

After paying for an extension on her visa, Drahosova had $80 to her name and began working three jobs trying to build up enough money to survive and eventually obtain a “green card” so she could enter the military service.

“It was tough,” said Drahosova, who called Pensacola, Fla., home at the time. “The first year I lived in America I worked all the time. I never had a day off and was always struggling to get by. I was tempted to just give up and return home, but I had a goal and I wasn’t going to fail.”

Working three jobs and just getting by was not what Drahosova had in mind when she went to America. The military was a way for her to learn important skills and build a solid foundation for a new life.

“The United States has a lot of opportunities that most countries don’t,” she said. “Being from another country, I feel I am able to see what opportunities the United States has available to its citizens. The Navy was just one of the ways I chose to start my life.”

Drahosova’s first hope of jobs in the military was as a linguist, since she speaks four languages. But not being a U.S. citizen had its drawbacks and disqualified her for this critical job so she set her mind on becoming a corpsman.

“If I couldn’t be a linguist or corpsman I never would have joined the Navy,” she said. “I’m glad I was able to become a corpsman. It is really something I enjoy.”

In January 2003, two years after getting to America, Drahosova let the journey begin. She reported for basic training and later checked in to field medical school. While in training she took her first steps toward becoming an American citizen.

“My chief in school gave me the citizenship paperwork and six months later I was granted my citizenship,” said Drahosova, who is now a petty officer third class. “Now I have nothing holding me back on having all of the opportunities that are available to all Americans.”

Not long after school she reported to Marine Light/Attack Helicopter Squadron 775 in Camp Pendleton, Calif. Soon after joining the squadron they deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in February 2004.

Drahosova was surprised by how quickly things were happening but said, “I took the time to try different things. I was able to help out with casualty evacuation missions; which was something I wanted to do from the moment I found out about the deployment.

Shortly after their return to the U.S. seven months later, the unit prepared to deploy to Iraq again. Upon returning to America, the Coyotes were at a 70 percent medical readiness rate. Drahosova had her work cut out for her and struck out to prepare the squadron for another deployment to the Middle East.

“She brought the squadron to a 96 percent medical readiness rate before returning to Iraq,” said Cmdr. Michael Dorney, the Coyotes’ flight surgeon. “On top of that, she was studying to get her Fleet Marine Force pin which she received a few months ago.”

Deployed again, Drahosova takes the time to get to know the Marines she is responsible for.

“If we hadn’t deployed twice in two years I would only see most of these guys once a month but I have gotten to know them better than I thought I would,” she said. “They are a great group and I’m glad to be a part of their team.”

Drahosova plans to take college classes and finish her degree while in the Navy and wants to how far she can advance in her career. “I like my job and enjoy the Navy,” she said. “I’ll see where the military takes me.”

Zuzana Drahosova is an American serving her adopted country with pride. She is not a quitter and is motivated to perform to exacting standards.

Moving to the U.S. with nothing, she now gives everything to the service of her fellow Marines and sailors in Iraq. This sailor is living proof that hard work and determination bring success.

*For more information about this story please contact Cpl. Herron at herronca@acemnf-wiraq.usmc.mil*

AL TAQADDUM, Iraq - Petty Officer 3rd Class Zuzana Drahosova, a corpsman with Marine Light/Attack Helicopter Squadron 775, draws a syringe in her small medical office here. Drahosova has been in the Navy since 2003.
Photo by: Cpl. C. Alex Herron

AL TAQADDUM, Iraq – Petty Officer 3rd Class Zuzana Drahosova, a corpsman with Marine Light/Attack Helicopter Squadron 775, is on her second deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom since enlisting in the U.S. Navy in 2003. A native of Slovakia, Drahosova moved to America in 2001 to start a new life. Photo by: Cpl. C. Alex Herron

15 posted on 06/24/2005 10:52:06 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: A.A. Cunningham

Thanks. I'm partially electronically challenged. I haven't learned how to post pictures yet.
I thought this was a story the news should have picked up instead of Aruba and Michael Jackson.


16 posted on 06/24/2005 10:56:22 AM PDT by Ramonan (Honor does not go out of style.)
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To: absolootezer0
she had a visa. she wasn't illegal.

It is illegal to work on a tourist visa. Even if her visa was of the kind that allows employment (H1), those are employer and job specific. You need three H1s to work for three different employers, or even three different jobs for the same employer.

17 posted on 06/24/2005 11:51:40 AM PDT by tarator
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To: tarator
It is illegal to work on a tourist visa.

We don't know what kind of visa this young Marine came on. What we do know is that we are all better off for her presence here. May God bless her, and may He bless all immigrants who work hard and obey the law and make our country better for it, especially those who serve!

18 posted on 06/24/2005 1:58:20 PM PDT by rogue yam
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To: lizol; AlexW

Devil-Dog Slovenka ping!

(When was the last time you got one of those?)


19 posted on 06/24/2005 2:04:47 PM PDT by rogue yam
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To: rogue yam
Thanks for the great ping.

Well, you will not find girls anywhere that are more beautiful then the girls here in Slovakia.
OK, I should also say that they are damn smart, too :)

Any Freeper that plans to visit here is welcome to contact me for any help or just to hoist a great Pivo together.
20 posted on 06/24/2005 3:02:06 PM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava)
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To: rogue yam
We don't know what kind of visa this young Marine came on.

We do know that it was not an immigrant visa (green card). The non-immigrant visas that allow employment are very restrictive as to what kind of employment the visa holder can seek. For example, the job an H1 visa holder can have must require a bachelor's degree. H1 visas do not need extending before 3 years, though, so it could not have been that. What else is there? F-1 (student visa) holders can only work on campus and must maintain full-time student status. Student visas do not need extending. They are valid well after the holder graduates from college. There are also special visas for managers and such and for religious workers. Somehow, I don't think this was her case. Most likely, she worked illegally.

What we do know is that we are all better off for her presence here. May God bless her, and may He bless all immigrants who work hard and obey the law and make our country better for it, especially those who serve!

Amen!

21 posted on 06/24/2005 6:46:46 PM PDT by tarator
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To: Ramonan

Now here is a LEGAL immigrant who is truly an American!


22 posted on 06/24/2005 6:50:52 PM PDT by abigailsmybaby
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