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UPS Orders Eight Boeing 747-400 Freighters
Business Wire ^ | August 17, 2005

Posted on 08/17/2005 8:09:49 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement

LOUISVILLE, Ky.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug. 17, 2005--As part of its on-going effort to accommodate strong international volume growth, UPS (NYSE:UPS) today announced a firm order for eight new Boeing 747-400 freighters from Boeing Co.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Deliveries of the 747-400's will begin in June 2007 and run through 2008. UPS has selected General Electric to provide engines for the new aircraft.

"These Boeing 747-400 freighters will allow UPS to smoothly increase capacity on its most important international 'trunk' routes connecting Asia, Europe and North America," said Bob Lekites, UPS vice president of airline and international operations.

UPS today relies on the Boeing MD-11 freighter as its primary international workhorse. UPS has 20 of those planes and another eight on order. The new 747-400 aircraft, which can handle a larger payload than the MD-11, will be used to "upsize" MD-11 routes as international volume grows.

In its most recent second quarter, UPS's export volume grew an impressive 18.2%, led by Asia export volume gains of 39.5%. China again drove Asia with export volume rising 99%.

The Boeing 747-400 freighter has the capacity to carry a structural payload of 250,000 pounds with a range of 4,400 nautical miles.

UPS is the world's largest package delivery company and a global leader in supply chain services, offering an extensive range of options for synchronizing the movement of goods, information, and funds. Headquartered in Atlanta, UPS serves more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. UPS stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange (UPS) and the company can be found on the Web at UPS.com.

(Excerpt) Read more at home.businesswire.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: 747; ba; boeing; freighters; ups
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Every little bit helps Boeing.

And this is on Forbes' website:

SG Cowen suggested buying Boeing (nyse: BA - news - people ) shares for "fair value" potential of $88 by late 2007.

SG Cowen said Boeing is a play on the recovering commercial aerospace cycle and has healthy new product momentum, cash redeployment potential, and a new chief executive "with skill sets to take [Boeing] to the next level." Near-term catalysts for Boeing include an expected 747 Advanced launch decision "in the next month or so" and third-quarter results, although "labor negotiations are an issue."

The research firm said its 2006 and 2007 earnings-per-share estimates of $3.35 and $4.50, respectively, have upside given the vigor in aircraft demand and Boeing's "apparent conservatism" in guidance.

1 posted on 08/17/2005 8:09:54 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

Just another sign of a failed economy


2 posted on 08/17/2005 8:18:22 AM PDT by txroadhawg (Don't believe any statistics unless you made them up yourself)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

How can they still have eight MD-11s "on order" ?


3 posted on 08/17/2005 8:18:25 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Scratch a Liberal. Uncover a Fascist)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

They still build MD-11? I thought that plane was closed down to new production long ago.


4 posted on 08/17/2005 8:20:00 AM PDT by devane617
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

The last MD-11 built, an MD-11F, was delivered to Lufthansa Cargo on 22 Feb 2001.

That said, I believe Boeing has a program where MD-11 airliners are converted to MD-11 freighters; this is probably what UPS has ordered.


5 posted on 08/17/2005 8:30:34 AM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks; devane617

Maybe this explains -- UPS release from earlier this year:

http://www.pressroom.ups.com/mediakits/pressrelease/0,2300,4512,00.html

UPS Secures 11 Boeing MD-11 Freighters
LOUISVILLE, Jan. 28, 2005 – UPS (NYSE:UPS) today announced it will acquire 11 pre-owned Boeing MD-11 aircraft to expand the capacity of its air network.
The additional aircraft bring the number of MD-11s in UPS’s fleet and on order to 28. Fifteen of the 28 planes now are in service.

UPS will take delivery of the first of these 11 aircraft during this year’s first quarter, with the remaining deliveries extending through 2007. The sale was arranged by Focus Aviation on behalf of Central Air Leasing and at one time, the 11 were flown by Swiss. Financial details were not disclosed. The acquisition will not require any adjustment to capital spending plans.

“The MD-11 has the technology, solid performance and strong operating economics that make it a wonderful fit for our international network,” said Bob Lekites, vice president of UPS Airlines and international operations.

The MD-11 has the capacity to carry approximately 190,000 pounds of cargo and a range of nearly 3,900 nautical miles. Although the MD-11 serves as UPS’s primary workhorse on international routes, the addition of these planes will support the growth of the entire integrated global network. UPS’s domestic overnight and international air businesses have been growing strongly. During the fourth quarter of 2004, for example, U.S. domestic overnight volume grew 4.1% and average daily international export volume rose 13.5%, with Asia export volume up 34% and export volume out of China up 125% compared to the prior year.

“We continually evaluate and adjust the company’s air network to meet the needs of our customers,” Lekites added. “Our strong growth has increased our need for large aircraft and the MD-11 is part of that solution.”

UPS is the world’s largest package delivery company and a global leader in supply chain services, offering an extensive range of options for synchronizing the movement of goods, information, and funds. Headquartered in Atlanta, UPS serves more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. UPS stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange (UPS) and the company can be found on the Web at UPS.com.


# # #


Except for historical information contained herein, the statements made in this release constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Such forward-looking statements, including statements regarding the intent, belief or current expectations of UPS and its management regarding the company's strategic directions, prospects and future results, involve certain risks and uncertainties. Certain factors may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements, including economic and other conditions in the markets in which we operate, governmental regulations, our competitive environment, strikes, work stoppages and slowdowns, increases in aviation and motor fuel prices, cyclical and seasonal fluctuations in our operating results, and other risks discussed in the company's Form 10-K and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which discussions are incorporated herein by reference.


6 posted on 08/17/2005 8:34:04 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

Does each plane come with a Wilson the Volleyball,or is that just FEDEX


7 posted on 08/17/2005 8:38:22 AM PDT by JIM O
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

I thought Northwest Airlines and Fed Ex owned all the DC-10s ever made...


8 posted on 08/17/2005 8:38:46 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Scratch a Liberal. Uncover a Fascist)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
Somebody needs to send this to that Branson guy that owns Virgin Airlines... he said a while back that Boeing would never sell another 747 after Airbus came out with the A380.

There's no substitute for the 747, and I bet these eight 747's will accomplish something that the A380 will never be able to... make a profit for their company.

9 posted on 08/17/2005 8:38:50 AM PDT by LIBERTARIAN JOE
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To: LIBERTARIAN JOE

Smug bastard. Hope he gets to eat his 380s.


10 posted on 08/17/2005 8:40:45 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Scratch a Liberal. Uncover a Fascist)
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To: txroadhawg
"Just another sign of a failed economy."

Say what?

11 posted on 08/17/2005 8:43:42 AM PDT by carl in alaska (Blog blog bloggin' on heaven's door.....Kerry's speeches are just one big snore.)
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To: All

for those who don't know all the model numbers, can someone explain the 747-400? Is this that comeptor to the a380 that was going to be built?

and now a really silly question, can a modern day 747 use a shorter runway? This way some of the regional airports don't have to extend (buy land) runways?


12 posted on 08/17/2005 8:43:47 AM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
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To: carl in alaska
"Just another sign of a failed economy."

Say what?

Please have your sarcasm detector recalibrated. It appears to be reading too low.

13 posted on 08/17/2005 8:50:30 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (Bork should have had Kennedy's USSC seat and Kelo v. New London would have gone the other way.)
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To: longtermmemmory

The 747-400 is the latest-and-greatest version of the 747, with advanced electronics and a "glass cockpit"--the instruments are on LCD screens or CRTs, very few analog gauges. It's got more range, more capacity, and more power than the older 747-200s and -300s.

Boeing is talking about something called the "747 Advanced", which would be sort of a competitor to the A380. It would invove stretching the 747-400 to lengthen the fuselage, changing the wings, putting in the advanced new engines being developed for the 787 Dreamliner, and all sorts of other things. But the 747 Advanced is still not a definite yet.

}:-)4


14 posted on 08/17/2005 8:53:52 AM PDT by Moose4 (Richmond, Virginia, where our motto is "Will Riot For Cheap Laptops")
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To: KarlInOhio
I guess he was being sarcastic, but you never know for sure on economic news. There is this little cabal of negative people around here who constantly trash the US economy even in response to positive news like this.

My sarcasm detector has now been adjusted upward by 5.2%. Recalibration complete.

15 posted on 08/17/2005 8:56:51 AM PDT by carl in alaska (Blog blog bloggin' on heaven's door.....Kerry's speeches are just one big snore.)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

Good. Maybe now I can get my Club Gitmo gear...


16 posted on 08/17/2005 9:05:48 AM PDT by OrioleFan (Republicans believe every day is July 4th, DemocRATs believe every day is April 15th. - Reagan)
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To: longtermmemmory
and now a really silly question, can a modern day 747 use a shorter runway?

The problem with the 380 isn't the length of the runway, it is the weight and width of the plane. Taxiways and ramp areas are probably going to need more work than the runways, and for the passenger versions, work will be needed on the terminals as well.

Atlanta makes a good example. Planes can currently park back to back at different terminals, with other planes passing both ways between them. Throw in some 380s, and there is only room for one way traffic between the terminals. The runways have plenty of length, but there are clearance issues to the side in some cases.

17 posted on 08/17/2005 9:07:06 AM PDT by PAR35
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

The horrible 1979 incident in Chicago was an AA DC-10. I think Delta had them in their fleet, too.

http://www.super70s.com/Super70s/Tech/Aviation/Disasters/79-05-25(Chicago).asp


18 posted on 08/17/2005 9:10:44 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

We lived in Prior Lake, Minnesota for 16 years and got to know the sound of the DC 10's 'grinding' as they went over. A couple of months ago, I was in Memphis on a sales call and heard that familiar nose...a DC 10 or MD 11 Fed Ex freighter.


19 posted on 08/17/2005 9:14:17 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Scratch a Liberal. Uncover a Fascist)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

Delta had a very few DC-10-10s, and not for very long; they got them in a merger with another airline (I think Western) and sold them off. (Delta used L-1011 Tristars as the backbone of their long-haul fleet from 1978-2001.)

They did have eight or ten MD-11s, they stopped flying them last year. A couple got sold or leased to World Airways (at least one's still flying with the red-and-blue Delta stripes under the World logo), the rest are, as far as I know, sitting out in the desert in California, unless UPS or another operator has picked some up for freighter use.

The MD-11 never really worked as a passenger liner for whatever reason, but it's sure found a second life as a freighter.

}:-)4


20 posted on 08/17/2005 10:38:30 AM PDT by Moose4 (Richmond, Virginia, where our motto is "Will Riot For Cheap Laptops")
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To: Moose4

I had the pleasure of flying Atlanta to LAX (IIRC) on a Delta L-1011 just days before the craft was retired from the fleet.


21 posted on 08/17/2005 4:26:07 PM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: devane617; MassRepublicanFlyersFan
They still build MD-11? I thought that plane was closed down to new production long ago.

It was. These are conversions from passenger to cargo versions. Boeing also offers an upgrade of the cockpit in DC-10 freighters to the same two crew cockpit that comes with MD-11. FedEx was the launch customer for that modification, because they have a large fleet of both DC-10's and MD-11's, and the cockpit upgrade allows them to have one pool of pilots to fly both. Also, the DC-10 required a three person crew, so it saves money on personnel. The upgraded DC-10 is called the MD-10.

22 posted on 08/17/2005 5:46:09 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: PAR35; longtermmemmory
The runways have plenty of length, but there are clearance issues to the side in some cases.

In some cases where there are parallel runways, one of them would have to be closed to allow an A380 to land or take off. This might be ok for an emergency, but not for routine operations.

23 posted on 08/17/2005 5:48:40 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan; COEXERJ145; microgood; liberallarry; cmsgop; shaggy eel; RayChuang88; ...
I couldn't tell from the article whether these will be 747-400F's or 747-400ERF's.

If you want on or off my aerospace ping list, please contact me by Freep mail not by posting to this thread.

24 posted on 08/17/2005 5:51:56 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: Paleo Conservative; PAR35

So can a modern 747 use a shorter runway than the older 747.

I am trying to figure out if the some of the smaller airports can make use of the 747 so it is not just the JFK's, LAX's or MIA's that can take advantage of the 747 in this day and age.


25 posted on 08/17/2005 5:53:44 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

I love to see those big birds coming off the assembly line. Thank goodness they will continue the line for many years to come!


26 posted on 08/17/2005 5:54:58 PM PDT by pissant
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To: longtermmemmory
So can a modern 747 use a shorter runway than the older 747.

Probably. The 400's have much more powerful engines than the 100, 200, and 300 models, and it has some aerodynamic improvements. It also depends on how heavily loaded it is. Air Force One supposedly can take off from fairly short runways when it doesn't have the fuel loaded for an intercontinental trip. Nominally it's a 747-200 airframe, but it has the two man digital glass cockpit of the 747-400 and the 747-400's engines.

27 posted on 08/17/2005 6:00:08 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: Paleo Conservative

My uncle worked building those 2 -200's (I think there were only the two, dunno). Of course, that's all he could ever tell anybody. Dang it. LOL.


28 posted on 08/17/2005 6:06:10 PM PDT by F15Eagle
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To: longtermmemmory
So can a modern 747 use a shorter runway than the older 747.

While engine performance can shorten the amount of runway a 747 needs, it is still restricted by its highly swept wings (37.5°) which is optimized for high cruising speed. The 747 is still the fastest subsonic airliner that has ever existed. The 747 Advanced will cruise at Mach .86 which is faster than the 400 model's and A380's Mach .85. The A380 due to advances in aerodynamics (a supercritical wing) is able to cruise at the same speed as the current generation of 747's while have less wing sweep which gives it better takeoff performance.

29 posted on 08/17/2005 6:08:15 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: LIBERTARIAN JOE

Now boeing will market the 747 Advanced for Passenger service... Still not as big as the 380 but it can land anywhere a 747 can land now.... Very cool


30 posted on 08/17/2005 6:11:08 PM PDT by ARA
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To: longtermmemmory
I am trying to figure out if the some of the smaller airports can make use of the 747 so it is not just the JFK's, LAX's or MIA's that can take advantage of the 747 in this day and age.

The smaller airports don't need the 747. The development of smaller twin engined planes that can fly intercontinental routes means people don't first have to fly to an internatinal gateway airport like JFK or LAX. Airlines can divert lots of the traffic that used to fly from JFK to LHR by offering direct flights from other cities in the US.

British Airways flys three flights per day each way between IAH (George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Houston) and London on 777-200LR's. The reason they don't have a couple of 747's on that route is that they want to have flexible schedules that allow their high yielding business and first class passengers the ability to pick their departure times.

31 posted on 08/17/2005 6:21:15 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: Paleo Conservative; longtermmemmory
British Airways flys three flights per day each way between IAH (George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Houston) and London on 777-200LR's.

I meant to say 777-200ER's.

32 posted on 08/17/2005 6:23:04 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: Paleo Conservative

Minor nit: The Convair 880 and 990 were faster than the 747, I'm pretty sure. I think the 880 could cruise at Mach .87, or higher if they felt like really slurping down the fuel. Those old GE turbojets weren't exactly efficient.

}:-)4


33 posted on 08/17/2005 6:41:28 PM PDT by Moose4 (Richmond, Virginia, where our motto is "Will Riot For Cheap Laptops")
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To: Moose4

Convair bit off more than they could chew with the 880 and especially the 990. They were the main reason why Boeing built the 720. The 747 can also fly Mach .9 or faster if you're not concerned with range.


34 posted on 08/17/2005 6:47:15 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (France is an example of retrograde chordate evolution.)
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To: longtermmemmory
I am trying to figure out if the some of the smaller airports can make use of the 747 so it is not just the JFK's, LAX's or MIA's that can take advantage of the 747 in this day and age.

The size of the airport doesn't necessarily correlate to the length of the runways. For example, both Austin, TX and Jackson, MS are fairly small but have long runways. Baton Rouge, in roughly the same size range, has runways so short that 737s have run off the end.

Here's some info on minimun runway lengths for the 747-400.

Fully loaded, 10,800 ft.
90% Max. Takeoff weight, 8,400 ft.
80% Max. Takeoff weight, 6,600 ft.

Note that lengths are longer for 100% weights for either a 767 or a 777, but shorter for 90% and 80%

Surprisingly, the 100% takeoff weight length for a 737 is roughly the same as for the 747 (slightly longer for a -300, slightly shorter for a -700). MD-11 is longer across the board than a 747-400.

Landings at 100% of max are always shorter than take off lengths, but there can be longer at lighter weights.

The page I was using was a PDF. www.san.org/documents/planning/assp/tier_one/Appendix%20B_Aircraft%20Runway%20Length%20Requirements.pdf

35 posted on 08/17/2005 7:03:26 PM PDT by PAR35
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To: All
Boeing 747-4xx pix at planepictures.net
36 posted on 08/17/2005 7:04:06 PM PDT by dighton
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

The 747's just keep going and going and going....


37 posted on 08/17/2005 8:29:45 PM PDT by JoJo Gunn (Help control the Leftist population. Have them spayed or neutered. )
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To: LIBERTARIAN JOE
Branson ...said ...that Boeing would never sell another 747 after Airbus came out with the A380.

Dang, and here I thought that Branson was somehow smart.

On a related issue, unless I missed something, EADS doesn't appear to be what one might term "forthcoming" about the A380 delays.

Reluctance to own up to design "issues" (if that's what it is) should give pause to any prudent prospective airplane buyer.

.

38 posted on 08/17/2005 9:02:51 PM PDT by Seaplaner (Never give in. Never give in. Never...except to convictions of honour and good sense. W. Churchill)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
does anybody ever fedex stuff to UPS?

Just a thought I just had.
39 posted on 08/17/2005 9:10:14 PM PDT by birbear (Admit it. you clicked on the "I have already previewed" button without actually previewing the post.)
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
UPS Orders Eight Boeing 747-400 Freighters

Unfortunately, they were shipped via USPS and got lost in the mail.

40 posted on 08/17/2005 9:38:15 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: birbear
does anybody ever fedex stuff to UPS?

LOL! I was thinking along those lines in my #40.

What I wonder is whether Fedex HQ has pickup locations for UPS, Airborne, et al. Something to think about.

41 posted on 08/17/2005 9:44:12 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan

My mom discovered tv shopping. This is why UPS needs more airplanes.


42 posted on 08/17/2005 9:46:00 PM PDT by cyborg (I'm having the best day ever.)
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To: LIBERTARIAN JOE
that Branson guy that owns Virgin Airlines... he said a while back that Boeing would never sell another 747

Yep, now I'm beginning to wonder whether they are really virgins, too.

43 posted on 08/17/2005 9:46:38 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: MassRepublicanFlyersFan
Pretty good order considering they're around $250 million each.


SEATTLE, Aug. 17, 2005 -- Boeing and UPS announced today that the package delivery carrier has ordered eight Boeing 747-400 Freighters for delivery in 2007 and 2008. The 747-400F can carry a maximum 120 tons of cargo, 25 tons more cargo than the 747-200 Freighters currently in the UPS fleet. In addition to the higher payload capability of 250,000 pounds (113 tonnes), the 747-400F consumes 15 percent less fuel than its predecessor, allowing the airplane to fly farther and to more destinations.

Boeing Press Release
44 posted on 08/18/2005 12:04:24 AM PDT by Righty_McRight
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To: cyborg
"My mom discovered tv shopping. This is why UPS needs more airplanes."

LOL. For me, it's my mother-in-law.

45 posted on 08/18/2005 4:34:24 AM PDT by Zuben Elgenubi
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To: Paleo Conservative

When was the last 380 ordered?

Anyone know?


46 posted on 08/18/2005 4:39:29 AM PDT by Sometimes A River (Che Guevera isn't cool)
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To: Acts 2:38

http://www.airbus.com/en/aircraftfamilies/a380/


47 posted on 08/18/2005 7:11:30 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
I thought Northwest Airlines and Fed Ex owned all the DC-10s ever made...

I think the United States Air Force has one or two, but they call them KC-10s...


48 posted on 08/18/2005 7:54:37 AM PDT by Yo-Yo
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To: Acts 2:38

The A350 made a sale today...



CIT Orders 29 Airbus Airplanes Worth $2.2 Billion
Thursday August 18, 8:39 AM EDT


NEW YORK -(Dow Jones)- CIT Group Inc. (CIT) (CIT) signed a purchase agreement with aircraft maker Airbus (ABI.YY) for 29 new airplanes worth $2.2 billion, based on Airbus' current list prices.

The purchase agreement covers 24 A320 aircraft, to be delivered in 2007 and 2008, and five A350 aircraft, to be delivered in 2012 and 2013, commercial and consumer finance company CIT said in a press release Thursday.

CIT also has options to acquire additional airplanes.

"We have seen significant improvement in the outlook for the international commercial aerospace sector," said Rick Wolfert, vice chairman, CIT Commercial Finance, in a press release Thursday. Demand from our clients for new aircraft is strong and growing, and rental rates have rebounded nicely."

CIT Aerospace, which leases, finances and manges commercial aircraft and regional jets, said it anticipates "high demand" for both types of aircraft.

New York Stock Exchange-listed shares of CIT Group closed Wednesday at $45.01, down 35 cents, or 0.8%.

Company Web site: http://www.cit.com

-Jenny Park; Dow Jones Newswires; 201-938-5400; AskNewswires@dowjones.com

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

08-18-05 0839ET

Copyright (c) 2005 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

© 2005 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


49 posted on 08/18/2005 8:11:07 AM PDT by ConservativeStatement
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To: Yo-Yo

I know, I know. The German and French airlines also have a fondness for them, too.


50 posted on 08/18/2005 8:11:16 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Scratch a Liberal. Uncover a Fascist)
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