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SOLAR WARMING UPDATE: Two Stories on the Environment
The Truth Detector ^ | October 10, 2005 | Rush Limbaugh

Posted on 10/10/2005 11:58:21 PM PDT by Yosemitest



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial; Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: democrat; environment; gas; liberal; nationalsecurity; oil; plants; rush; scientology; timber; trees; wood
Rush, thank you again.

My relatives in Mississippi tell me that timber (logs) sell now at $35.00 a ton, down $10.00 a ton from prior to the hurricane damage. So ... with gas increasing in price, and timber dropping 22.22 percent in price before federal and state tax ... some land owners think that it's not worth the cost in hard labor, time and money, to try to salvage the timber that was blown down.

My relatives said that most mills have stopped taking timber from private individuals, unless they personaly know and trust the man delivering the logs to the mill. Too many of the logs that were blown down, were from people's yards or fence lines and carry the danger of having nails, or dog chains grown into them. This is a terrible danger to the man running the saw-mill. If timber is salvaged from a suspected area, then it usually goes for chip-board, or particle-board, or whole tree pulp-wood. The end result is that blown down trees have about a 50 percent chance of being not usable for lumber, since the bending of the tree in the strong wind usually tears them up on the inside. If you cut them into shorter 8 or 10 foot logs, some will break apart down the middle, from the bending of several different directions from the wind, before the hurricane stops. And then there's tornado damage to a lot of the timber, which normally snaps the trees off above the ground, or blows them down in many different dirrections in a small area. Tornado damage makes it very difficult to get to the base of the trees to cut them up, and makes it hard to load them. In some areas, log roads had to be built where the rain washed out the roads.

So when you see lumber prices rise, don't think the money is getting to the one who owned the timber. Some people are having to pay $400.00 a tree to get them removed. But the poor land owners in the country, ... most are cutting the damaged timber up themselves, and paying someone to come and take the trees to the mill. If the bark falls off the trees, from waiting too long to take them to market, the mill won't take them. If a log is over 30 inches in diameter, the mill won't take it, because their equipment can't handle it. A lot of trees will rot where they fell, and most will get burned this fall, either in the fields where they lay, or for fire wood if they aren't pine.

It's bad all the way around. Two days of work cutting up a load of logs (between 16 to 18 tons) and paying for someone to deliver them to the mill ($100.00 to $140.00) after taxes might bring about $400.00. Then you get to pay for your fuel, maintain your chain saw, buy mosquito repellant, and pay for the fuel the tractor uses to clean up the mess from the limbs that were left from the logs. But ... you can't beat the work-out for exercise.

1 posted on 10/10/2005 11:58:23 PM PDT by Yosemitest
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To: Yosemitest

I was beginning to wonder if we were going to run out of toothpicks. Guess not. Whew, that was close.


2 posted on 10/11/2005 12:15:41 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Government is running amuck)
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To: taxesareforever
That's about all alot of that pine is good for. 150 miles inland around Newton, Mississippi, alot of the old close-grained pines are laying on the ground. I wonder how much of the Natchez Trace Parkway is open, and how much of that beautiful timber isn't there any more.

It's going to make good termite food.

3 posted on 10/11/2005 12:22:31 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: Yosemitest
"Most geologists view crude oil, like coal and natural gas, as the product of compression and heating of ancient vegetation over geological time scales.

This is sort of what my last post was about in a "some Government programs create work just to keep themselves alive" sort of way. To say you're going to clean the soil at a site to a level that's lower than background in areas nearby is crazy. I'd say dilute it with nearby soil if there are concerns to reach such low levels. Sometimes dilution is the solution to environmental pollution. I've spent 15 years as an environmental chemist and know superfund programs (and the money they waste) very well.

4 posted on 10/11/2005 12:29:26 AM PDT by kipita (Conservatives: Freedom and Responsibility………Liberals: Freedom from Responsibility)
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To: Yosemitest

Such a shame. If they only would have let it be cut sooner.


5 posted on 10/11/2005 12:36:44 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Government is running amuck)
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To: kipita
"...some Government programs create work just to keep themselves alive..."

I agree. Have you read the book Cleaning the soil is, in my opinion, almost impossible. Oil came out of the ground, and it can go back into the ground. The earth will clean itself, if given the time.

But about cleanups... I really like to know your opinion of the cleanup of these old military bases like Warminister, PA and if you think that the only thing that can be done with them is ...say use them to build nuclear power plants.

But the timber situation in Mississippi, is why I posted this article. I know many people who lost a lot of good timber to those hurricanes, and the new hybrid pines are glorified milkweeds. They grow twice as fast as the close grain pines, but weigh less than half the weight of the old pines. The new pines aren't worth anything except for pulp wood for paper, or chip or particle board. They really are a waste of good land.

6 posted on 10/11/2005 12:47:45 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: taxesareforever
I agree about the timber along the Natchez Trace, but most of the timber that was blown down, belongs to private individuals, with only 20 to 100 acres of land, and a lot of the timber is on land that isn't very useful for anything else. It's either very swampy, very hilly, or very hard to get to.

And the big, timber around the little towns and cities, is either too large to cut for lumber, or in danger of having some metal inside of it. Some of the pecan orchards I saw that were torn apart, driving up highway 45 from Mobile to Meridian, would make excellent furniture, but most of it will be piled up and burned where it lays, or maybe used for fire wood this winter.

7 posted on 10/11/2005 12:53:26 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: Yosemitest
But about cleanups... I really like to know your opinion of the cleanup of these old military bases like Warminister, PA and if you think that the only thing that can be done with them is ...say use them to build nuclear power plants.

The major problem with old military bases are the chlorinated hydrocarbons (usually TCE) that were used as degreasers and cleaners. In most cases, the halogenated organics have premeditated into the groundwater and are very toxic to life. As far as the hydrocarbons are concerned, there's more hydrocarbons on the surface of a candy bar then there is at most sites. It's simply food for the bugs. Sorry, I know very little about wood.

8 posted on 10/11/2005 1:03:15 AM PDT by kipita (Conservatives: Freedom and Responsibility………Liberals: Freedom from Responsibility)
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To: kipita
But Warminister, PA's problem is with chemical and biological agents researched and produced for world war two.

I don't know how you would clean that up.

9 posted on 10/11/2005 1:09:06 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: kipita

And wood, is also great bug food, and rotted wood contributes to great topsoil. If you burn it, it makes great potash, which also makes good topsoil, in moderation.


10 posted on 10/11/2005 1:12:13 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: kipita
As far as oil is concerned... Rush has a great ideal from another article titled Bottled Water Industry Gouging.

But it'll never see the light of day, and we couldn't afford this lesson, even if the oil companies decided to teach us this valuable lesson.
11 posted on 10/11/2005 1:22:00 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: Yosemitest
But Warminister, PA's problem is with chemical and biological agents researched and produced for world war two.

Well, that's a can of worms issue that I'll not mention here. And anyone who respects their secret clearances shouldn't say much either. But one has to remember things were done differently back them. And that's that.

To answer you’re question more specifically about chlorinated hydrocarbons, the answer is usually DNAPLS (pronounced dean-apples; Dense Non-aqueous phase liquids). It’s simple really, the chlorinated hydrocarbons are more dense (heavier) than water and so they will permeate into the cracks of the aquifer and are thus impossible to clean. Therefore, it’s sometimes best to just monitor them (via monitoring wells) and make sure the plume (contaminated water) stays within a certain contain area.

12 posted on 10/11/2005 1:32:43 AM PDT by kipita (Conservatives: Freedom and Responsibility………Liberals: Freedom from Responsibility)
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To: Yosemitest
And wood, is also great bug food, and rotted wood contributes to great topsoil. If you burn it, it makes great potash, which also makes good topsoil, in moderation.

Given this, there seems to be a supply-demand match. After the hurricanes, the US has plenty of wood that can be used as fill for topsoil. There are many third world lands around the globe with topsoil problems. Isn't it better to create fishermen?

13 posted on 10/11/2005 1:39:19 AM PDT by kipita (Conservatives: Freedom and Responsibility………Liberals: Freedom from Responsibility)
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To: kipita
Read the book Germs : Biological Weapons and America's Secret War (Hardcover).

Or better yet, listen to the book on CDs. It's worth your time.

14 posted on 10/11/2005 1:39:42 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: kipita
Read the book Germs : Biological Weapons and America's Secret War (Hardcover).

Or better yet, listen to the book on CDs. It's worth your time.

15 posted on 10/11/2005 1:40:30 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: kipita

Fishermen are always good. Problem solvers are better.


16 posted on 10/11/2005 1:41:57 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: Yosemitest

My simple view of it is that during the 50s and 60s, Governments developed 100s of ways to kill millions of people very quickly and efficiently. When it gets to the point of countering the 100s of ways all your enemies have, it gets to the point of a different solution, “A NEW WORLD ORDER”. When Governments act in secret, the world becomes less ordered. In short (similar to your tag line), the choice for humanity is to either work towards “WORLD ORDER” and towards disorder (and possible mass human extermination).


17 posted on 10/11/2005 2:02:15 AM PDT by kipita (Conservatives: Freedom and Responsibility………Liberals: Freedom from Responsibility)
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To: kipita

And your tag line is also very true.

But our enemies today ... most people don't understand just how serious they are. May I recommend for all who will listen or are concerned...


18 posted on 10/11/2005 2:17:06 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: Yosemitest
"We're going to limit these 47 different formulations of gasoline to accommodate the various regulations in the states for pollution purposes."

These gasoline regulations are the EPA on Steroids! Only one formula is needed and that is to keep the sulfa content under control - ever think of filling your tank in one state and driving into another state with entirely different gas formulations - commingling with other gas as you add gas to what is already in the tank perhaps unwittingly creating some nocuous pollutant and drive on to another state with other regulations where we add more formulations for that state - are we breaking the law somehow? No, we have just allowed a stupid law to manipulate the taxpayer into paying higher taxes…some of these additives have poisoned the land where highways cross it, yet the Congress is slow to stop the practice…follow the money. One formula for clean air would lower the costs for fuel and enable the refinery to produce far more fuel --- that is not to say we will not need to build more refineries, we desperately need more however, the practice of “blending fuels” must be ended.

19 posted on 10/11/2005 6:23:33 AM PDT by yoe
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To: yoe
I agree. When I was stationed out in California, I remember people complaining about headaches when they'd get stuck in heavy traffic. Then later, I remember that the oxygen additive to the fuel, was leaking into the water table, causing many fuel tanks at gas stations to be dug up and replaced.

These environmental idiots cause more wasted money than their worth.

20 posted on 10/11/2005 8:58:42 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: taxesareforever
An update on timber prices...

My father tells me that as of today pine logs were selling for $16.00 to $14.00 a ton and they are watching the logs for "blueing" to cull them to pulp wood at a much cheaper price.

If you're not careful, a load of logs will bring less than the cost of the fuel to harvest and deliver it cost.

21 posted on 10/18/2005 8:11:17 PM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die)
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To: Yosemitest

$16 to $14 a ton makes it a good buy for firewood, at least if it was in the Pacific Northwest.


22 posted on 10/18/2005 9:45:20 PM PDT by taxesareforever (Government is running amuck)
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