Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Homeland Security opening private mail
MSNBC ^ | Jan. 36 2006 | Brock N. Meeks

Posted on 01/08/2006 4:48:09 PM PST by blogblogginaway

WASHINGTON - In the 50 years that Grant Goodman has known and corresponded with a colleague in the Philippines he never had any reason to suspect that their friendship was anything but spectacularly ordinary.

But now he believes that the relationship has somehow sparked the interest of the Department of Homeland Security and led the agency to place him under surveillance.

(Excerpt) Read more at msnbc.msn.com ...


TOPICS: Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 1984; aclulist; donutwatch; govwatch; homelandsecurity; jackbootedthugs; mail; philippines
My guess is DHS has their reasons.
1 posted on 01/08/2006 4:48:10 PM PST by blogblogginaway
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

Homeland Security has its own intelligence gathering arm?


2 posted on 01/08/2006 4:53:24 PM PST by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway
My guess is DHS has their reasons.

My guess is that nobody will blink an eye until it's thier mail that gets opened

oh, and that .380 ruger security six you have in your nightstand, .....DHS deems it a threat to the civilian populace

how'd they find out about it?

that neat little speedloader you bought from cabelas mail order

3 posted on 01/08/2006 4:53:53 PM PST by Revelation 911 (God is love, Love endures forever, Love God, Love your neighbor, Vengeance is mine)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

One one hand I am somewhat indignant that this could occur in the specific situation described. One the other hand the fact that it was so obviously marked as having been opened and by what group does lessen my concern.

I also think that this was rather clumsily done by no-n*t, ensconced beaurocratic toadies who don't have a clue as to what they are supposed to be doing, much less the skills to do it.


4 posted on 01/08/2006 5:00:19 PM PST by Khurkris ("Hell, I was there"...Elmer Keith.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

I wonder if his emails go anything like this:

DEAR MARCO,

EVERYTHING GOES AS PLANNED HERE IN USA. DELIVERY OF PARTS ON
SCHEDULE. ASSEMBLY OF DEVICES NEARLY COMPLETE.

HASAM SAYS PARTY SHOULD BE BLAST. LIKE DYING AND GOING TO
HEAVEN.

TELL POPS TO SEND MORE MONEY. EVERYTHING COSTS MORE THAN
EXPECTED.

ADOPTED FAMILY HERE IN USA GROWING. BRANCHING OUT IN NEW
CITIES. BUSINESS IS GREAT.

REGARDS,
POLO

PS - DEATH TO THE INFIDELS!!!


5 posted on 01/08/2006 5:01:26 PM PST by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway
University of Kansas, huh? Interesting...

And he just happens to be a mail snooper in WWII? What a coincidence!

I love all of his conjectures: That DHS is monitoring him personally. Hmmm. BTW, an important passage for those who don't click to the article:

“All mail means ‘all mail,’” said John Mohan, a CBP spokesman, emphasizing the point.

“This process isn’t something we’re trying to hide,” Mohan said, noting the wording on the agency’s Web site. “We’ve had this authority since before the Department of Homeland Security was created,” Mohan said.

6 posted on 01/08/2006 5:01:26 PM PST by AmishDude
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: coconutt2000
“All mail originating outside the United States Customs territory that is to be delivered inside the U.S. Customs territory is subject to Customs examination,” says the CBP Web site. That includes personal correspondence. “All mail means ‘all mail,’” said John Mohan, a CBP spokesman, emphasizing the point. “This process isn’t something we’re trying to hide,” Mohan said, noting the wording on the agency’s Web site. “We’ve had this authority since before the Department of Homeland Security was created,” Mohan said.

Yippee,another non-story.
7 posted on 01/08/2006 5:03:51 PM PST by WTSand
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

The international letter mail I receive via UPS, FedEx, DHL, USPS, etc. is routinely opened and resealed.

Everything that comes into this country is subject to customs inspection. If this guy is 81 years old, one would assume he is aware of this. Just stirring up crap.

It does seem strange that you can't correspond to a person without the presumption of privacy but it is and has nearly always been a price we pay for security.

I know it is not relevant, but I bet anything the parties on both side of this story are leftists.


8 posted on 01/08/2006 5:07:45 PM PST by keat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WTSand

"ALL MAIL"

'Imagine they are getting pretty tired of CitiBank adverts by now.


9 posted on 01/08/2006 5:08:07 PM PST by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like what you say))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway
That is why when I fly I always put a note in my checked luggage for the Totally Stupid A$$holes that they need to be looking at the islamosheetheads and not rooting in the stuff I'm taking to Mom.

After all they are nice enough to leave me a little note after they break into my luggage.

10 posted on 01/08/2006 5:09:13 PM PST by ChefKeith (Flies,fleas,ants,ticks,cockroaches,lawyers,judges & politicians All the same. Useless!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

They have been doing this for years...

It's not about terrorism...

They inspect packages and thick letters to see if they contain contraband...money (Cash), drugs, pornography...

It is usually random...


11 posted on 01/08/2006 5:11:01 PM PST by LadyDoc (liberals only love politically correct poor people)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

Fine with me. All I get is junk mail anyway. I just wish they'd throw that crap away instead of forwarding it all to me.


12 posted on 01/08/2006 5:11:38 PM PST by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: keat
It does seem strange that you can't correspond to a person without the presumption of privacy but it is and has nearly always been a price we pay for security.

Why would you presume to have any kind of privacy in regards to something that leaves your house or workplace and travels to another location through a system setup and monitored by the government (even if the USPS isn't directly managed by the government)

I'm not taking a stand one way or another, I'm just saying that you should never assume anything is private in regards to something that leaves your sight while being transferred to somebody else, whether it's mail that travels through the USPS or whether it's email. You shouldn't even assume your cell phone calls are private, as a lot of people are finding out.

No, I'm not a tinfoiler either, I just know that the government has been opening mail for God knows how many decades, and I know that email is not as private as people assume it is, and I know that you or I or anybody else can easily acquire phone records (even though it's not the actual conversation, just knowing who people call can reveal a lot).
13 posted on 01/08/2006 5:18:16 PM PST by af_vet_rr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: keat; blogblogginaway

> I know it is not relevant, but I bet anything the
> parties on both side of this story are leftists.

The guy is in the Peoples Republic of Lawrence KS,
the bluest part of this otherwise red state,
so odds are better than even.

This is a non-story (just like Echelon)
"All mail" is subject to inspection. The odds of a random
just finally caught up with this chap.

If he were really under surveillance, I strongly suspect
that DHS/Customs/FBI would NOT have left obvious evidence
of mail inspection.


14 posted on 01/08/2006 5:19:00 PM PST by Boundless
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: AmishDude

It is ironic, isn't it? Goodman used to earn a living opening other people's mail and has written about it.


America’s Japan $24.95

The First Year, 1945–1946
Grant K. Goodman
ISBN 0823225151
176 pages
Cloth
Publication date: 10/1/2005



“This book entices like a rare gem. Second Lieutenant Grant K. Goodman, then 21, was honest, brilliant, energetic, and, above all, enamored of a great cause: the democratization of Japan.”
—Rinjiro Sodei, Hosei University

“America’s Japan is a rare and insightful working-level view of the Occupation informed by Goodman’s lifelong career of scholarship and involvement with East Asia.”
—Ronald H. Spector, The George Washington University and author of Eagle Against the Sun: The American War with Japan

One of the few non-Japanese Americans trained to read, write, and speak Japanese, Princeton undergraduate Grant Goodman had a privileged position during World War II. As an Army lieutenant, Goodman served in the Philippines at the close of the war and in Tokyo as an intelligence officer on General Douglas MacArthur’s staff. Goodman translated thousands of letters, interviews, and other documents by Japanese citizens of all kinds, and came to know, as few Americans could, the “hearts and minds” of a defeated people as they moved slowly to democracy.

This book is a not only a fascinating personal chronicle of Grant Goodman’s unique experience in Japan. Moving deftly between his role as an Army officer gathering essential information and as a young scholar fascinated by Japanese culture, he provides a vividly drawn portrait of daily life in occupied Tokyo.

Here he looks back at signal events: Japan’s responses to occupation, the writing of the new constitution and the de-deification of the Emperor, the International Military Tribunal and the issue of Japanese war crimes, reactions by ordinary Japanese to American occupiers, and much more. September 2, 2005, marks the 50th anniversary of the Japanese surrender on the deck of the USS Missouri. First published in Japanese in 1986, America’s Japan is not only superb history. It is also a timely reminder of the realities of war and the responsibilities of victors and vanquished alike.






Grant K. Goodman is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Kansas. The author or editor of many books and articles, he was influential in establishing Japanese studies in the United States.

http://www.nyupress.org/product_info.php?products_id=4696


15 posted on 01/08/2006 5:25:39 PM PST by blogblogginaway (..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ChefKeith
After all they are nice enough to leave me a little note after they break into my luggage.

I don't mind them looking in my luggage. What I do mind is the zip ties that they use to seal it afterwards. They are a pain to remove, since you can't carry anything that will cut them in your carryon.

Hey TSA folks - if I wanted my luggage locked, I'd put a lock on it. No locks should = no zip ties.

16 posted on 01/08/2006 5:31:30 PM PST by PAR35
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

I once worked for a military electronics manufacturing company. In my position, I had a Top Secret clearance.

I am also an amateur radio operator. I would send contact confirmation (QSL) cards to and receive them from Communist countries. Many were opened. Who cares.


17 posted on 01/08/2006 5:45:14 PM PST by lawdude (LIEberals/socialists make up facts and history as they go!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway
Sounds like the legend of the college student who got the Mao Little Red Book.
18 posted on 01/08/2006 5:52:19 PM PST by Mike Darancette (Mesocons for Rice '08)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway
Dear Ben Laden,

I am so tired of the bushes that the are here in the country I have decided to kill them in my yard.

I am also planning to set off some bombs in my basement to be rid of the bugs and dem rats.

I went to the zoo and saw the seals and other marine members. I will send you pictures.

I gotta go... I smell the bombs going off...hope I dont kill half the city of New York!!Har Har Har

Joe TenKiller
Mena, Arkansas

19 posted on 01/08/2006 5:56:38 PM PST by DainBramage
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PAR35
What I do mind is the zip ties that they use to seal it afterwards.

Thye gave you zip ties? Lucky you. The last time I traveled, I gave them zip ties to secure my bags, and they never put them on. Instead, my bags were left open for all to go through.

20 posted on 01/08/2006 5:58:29 PM PST by Sarajevo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: coconutt2000
Goodman is no stranger to mail snooping; as an officer during World War II he was responsible for reading all outgoing mail of the men in his command and censoring any passages that might provide clues as to his unit’s position. “But we didn’t do it as clumsily as they’ve done it, I can tell you that,” Goodman noted, with no small amount of irony in his voice. “Isn’t it funny that this doesn’t appear to be any kind of surreptitious effort here,” he said.

So when it is done unto him as he had done unto others, he is offended? He must be a liberal.

21 posted on 01/08/2006 6:17:10 PM PST by LoneRangerMassachusetts (Some say what's good for others, the others make the goods; it's the meddlers against the peddlers)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: af_vet_rr
Why would you presume to have any kind of privacy in regards to something that leaves your house or workplace

Agree 100%. I always tell people not to wtite anything in an email that you don't want the whole world to see. Stands to reason same goes for snail mail.
22 posted on 01/08/2006 7:09:32 PM PST by keat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Texas Eagle

I really don't give a Damn if they read my mail either.


23 posted on 01/08/2006 7:20:28 PM PST by ANGGAPO (LayteGulfBeachClub)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: ANGGAPO; cardinal4

About 25 years ago, I had a contact in Seattle that sent me 10-20 betamax movies a month to Saudi Arabia, via APO. After viewing them, I had to deliver them to the Lockheed City compound. For the most part, they came through the APO system untouched. Once, however, I got a package that had obviously been opened. There were some Air Force stamps saying that the joint US/Saudi customs people had opened the package and found some pornographic material which had been confiscated. My contact in Seattle always enclosed a packing list of the titles of the movies he'd sent. The one beta tape that had been confiscated as pornography was "Blue Lagoon," with Brooke Shield. We were fairly certain that the Saudi authorities took the tape home and viewed it themselves, just as the weasels drank all the confiscated booze they could appropriate.


24 posted on 01/08/2006 8:37:01 PM PST by Ax (Sky King, Sky King, Do Not Answer, Do Not Answer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Ax
I just arrived BRU (Brussels) yesterday on a cargo flight from JFK. I will return on 14JAN same way. Trust me, its much more fun on a cargo flight than commercial, especially when they have bunks.

I must tell you and everyone on this thread; TSA and CBP have the authority to open anything entering or leaving the country by any mode of transport. This includes luggage, mail or cargo - even H.R.s (Human remains). This has been true for years, long before September 11th.

In addition to TSA and CBP examination guidelines, there are two other factors used by them when deciding on specific items they choose to examine:

Local discretion. This is when an officer uses their gut, instinct or experience to guide them. If it looks like a situation is odd or something doesn't make sense its better to examine than not.

Carrier notification. This is when a transporting carrier (airline, ship, trucker, railroad, etc) notifies TSA or CBP that something specific needs to looked at. These are when the carrier involved has the same reaction that a TSA or CBP officer would have.

25 posted on 01/09/2006 2:42:14 AM PST by QwertyKPH (I didn't do it, nobody saw me do it, you can't prove anything!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: freepatriot32

FYI


26 posted on 01/09/2006 5:45:27 AM PST by sheltonmac (QUIS CUSTODIET IPSOS CUSTODES)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ChefKeith

"That is why when I fly I always put a note in my checked luggage for the Totally Stupid A$$holes that they need to be looking at the islamosheetheads and not rooting in the stuff I'm taking to Mom.
After all they are nice enough to leave me a little note after they break into my luggage."




Not too bright, IMO. It's a good way for your luggage to show up somewhat later than you do at the destination. In the second place, they do not know from your luggage that you are not an islamofascist, now, do they?

But, hey, you go right ahead with your note insertions.


27 posted on 01/09/2006 6:51:47 AM PST by MineralMan (godless atheist)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: blogblogginaway

What do the DHS people remove from mail? Money? Artwork? Family pictures?

I know that some Middle East country's DHS-equivalents remove all these. They also keep lists of what people write or send. It makes profiling easier and it can be useful no matter which party is in power.


28 posted on 01/09/2006 6:54:57 AM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch ist der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: af_vet_rr

All correspondence should be addressed as:

Dear xxxxx and Gentlemen of the Jury,


29 posted on 01/09/2006 6:57:28 AM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch ist der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: albertp; Allosaurs_r_us; Abram; AlexandriaDuke; Americanwolf; Annie03; Baby Bear; bassmaner; ...
Libertarian ping.To be added or removed from my ping list freepmail me or post a message here
30 posted on 01/10/2006 12:08:51 PM PST by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson